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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Dean R. DeGroot

Since November 1989, East Germany (like other former eastern bloc nations) has found that economic progress has come at a slow and painful pace. These efforts, however, have been…

373

Abstract

Since November 1989, East Germany (like other former eastern bloc nations) has found that economic progress has come at a slow and painful pace. These efforts, however, have been unique since they have involved reunification with sisters and brothers in the west. A three‐year study was conducted with German business consultants, many of whom are involved in either outplacement or career development services. The study is in two phases: face‐to‐face interviews in Germany in early 1993; and follow‐up surveys and telephone contacts between November 1995 and January 1996. Results indicate that reunification has so far resulted in growth of GDP and that East Germans are as a whole a talented group that are integrating into the economy. However, adjustment to a capitalist economy continues to be difficult psychologically for these employees and unemployment continues to remain fairly high throughout Germany. Their experiences also appear to reflect a greater trend globally ‐ powerful economies unable to create enough quality jobs for their populace, which then leads to job loss or fear of job loss. Knowledge of these results can assist career professionals in working with the workforce in Germany, as well as in other nations recovering from the Soviet regime.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Dean R. DeGroot

International employment continues to grow for the industrializednations as their economies become more interdependent. An example ofthis trend involves Germany and the US…

825

Abstract

International employment continues to grow for the industrialized nations as their economies become more interdependent. An example of this trend involves Germany and the US employment and career issues which need to be considered when consulting abroad. Research was conducted in order to compare and contrast German and US outplacement/career practices. Specific interview impressions were gathered from several outplacement/career management professionals in Germany. Provides details about outplacement consulting services, differences in employee/career aspects between German and US employees, and the unique challenges faced by German employees. Although many outplacement services are similar between the two nations, German consultants appear to provide more of an “administrative” focus when working with German employees, whereas the US consulting firms provide more of a “sales” focus. German employees have historically had more employment protections than their counterpart US employees. However, political and economic changes in Germany are more volatile than those experienced in the USA. The “safety net” for German employees is beginning to crumble, and with these changes come insecurity and emotional distress. Knowledge of these nuances can assist career professionals in working with a German workforce.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Philip Beaulieu and Alan Reinstein

Extant theory tends to treat Organizational Culture (OC) and fraud-related values as static, characterizing culture as synonymous with potential ethical values − but devoting less…

Abstract

Extant theory tends to treat Organizational Culture (OC) and fraud-related values as static, characterizing culture as synonymous with potential ethical values − but devoting less attention to how the culture and values arose and where they are headed. Buffer/conduit theory proposes that accountants learn to use a taxonomy containing three dynamic layers: collective fraud orientation, a buffer/conduit layer, and individual fraud orientation. The middle layer contains OC-related internal controls that buffer the orientation layers from spreading fraud-encouraging values, and serve as conduits transmitting fraud-deterring values − or, when controls do not function as intended, transmitting fraud-encouraging values. A factor analysis of 11 indicators of this three-layer taxonomy suggests that older generations of accounting practitioners apply the taxonomy, but millennials do not. Predisposition to commit fraud is especially salient to internally focused millennials, who uniquely perceive recruitment and training as compensating mechanisms and as collective buffers.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-402-1

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2013

Abstract

Details

Transformational and Charismatic Leadership: The Road Ahead 10th Anniversary Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-600-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Catherine McGlynn and Shaun McDaid

Abstract

Details

Radicalisation and Counter-Radicalisation in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-005-5

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Franz T. Lohrke, Charles M. Carson and Archie Lockamy

The purpose of this paper is to review Bayesian analysis in recent entrepreneurship research to assess how scholars have employed these methods to study the entrepreneurship…

3506

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Bayesian analysis in recent entrepreneurship research to assess how scholars have employed these methods to study the entrepreneurship process. Researchers in other business fields (e.g. management science, marketing, and finance) have increasingly employed Bayesian methods to study issues like decision making. To date, however, Bayesian methods have seen only limited use in entrepreneurship research.

Design/methodology/approach

After providing a general overview of Bayesian methods, this study examines how extant entrepreneurship research published in leading journals has employed Bayesian analysis and highlights topics these studies have investigated most frequently. It next reviews topics that scholars from other business disciplines have investigated using these methods, focusing on issues related to decision making, in particular.

Findings

Only seven articles published in leading management and entrepreneurship journals between 2000 and 2016 employed or discussed Bayesian methods in depth when studying the entrepreneurship process. In addition, some of these studies were conceptual.

Research limitations/implications

This review suggests that Bayesian methods may provide another important tool for researchers to employ when studying decision making in high uncertainty situations or the impact of entrepreneurial experience on decision making over time.

Originality/value

This review demonstrates that Bayesian analysis may be particularly appropriate for entrepreneurship research. By employing these methods, scholars may gain additional insights into entrepreneurial phenomenon by allowing researchers to examine entrepreneurial decision making. Through this review and these recommendations, this study hopes to encourage greater Bayesian analysis usage in future entrepreneurship research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

Details

The Political Economy of Policy Reform: Essays in Honor of J. Michael Finger
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-816-3

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to open in…

Abstract

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to open in 1986 and will provide research facilities for up to 20 major projects designed to improve the competitiveness of Canadian business practices.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Cindy Cheng, Timothy Bartram, Leila Karimi and Sandra Leggat

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of transformational leadership (TL) in developing social identity and its subsequent impact on team climate, intention to leave…

9304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of transformational leadership (TL) in developing social identity and its subsequent impact on team climate, intention to leave, burnout and quality of patient care among nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this cross-sectional study were collected from a sample of 201 registered nurses in Australia through questionnaires. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results illustrate that social identification appears to be the psychological mechanism through which TL impacts important employee outcomes, including perceived quality of patient care.

Practical implications

This study provides valuable insights into understanding the critical role of human resource management (HRM) practice and policy in healthcare environments. Findings from this study indicate that human resource managers can assist nurse unit managers to deliver their HRM roles effectively when adequate support and relevant HRM infrastructures are put in place.

Originality/value

This research considers the role of first-line nurse managers in healthcare organisations. It provides evidence-based knowledge about the type of leadership style required to achieve desirable employee outcomes and the essential HRM opportunities to facilitate this.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Mary McCormick, Angela R. Bielefeldt, Christopher W. Swan and Kurtis G. Paterson

The purpose of this study was to design an assessment instrument to evaluate students’ attitudes toward sustainable engineering (SE). Factors that impact SE beliefs could then be…

1440

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to design an assessment instrument to evaluate students’ attitudes toward sustainable engineering (SE). Factors that impact SE beliefs could then be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the definition of sustainability from the Brundtland report and expectancy value theory, students’ sentiment toward SE was evaluated using items to assess SE self-efficacy, SE value and SE affect. The survey was distributed at three diverse universities with 515 responses from students ranging from first year through graduate studies in a variety of engineering majors. The survey instrument was validated using principal components analysis, and internal reliability was established via high Cronbach’s alpha for each construct.

Findings

Participation in more experiential, enriching learning experiences correlated to higher SE self-efficacy, value and affect. Extracurricular club involvement correlated with a lower self-efficacy but high SE value. Students who had participated in undergraduate research had a high SE self-efficacy, particularly in the environmental and social sub-scales. The students who participated in internships had high SE self-efficacy but lower SE affect. A greater number of volunteer hours correlated with increased SE affect. Female students possessed higher SE value and affect than male students, but self-efficacy was not significantly different. SE self-efficacy increased with academic rank.

Originality/value

This is the first effort to measure engineering students’ attitudes toward SE using the three sub-scales of expectancy value theory and assessing correlations in these attributes with students’ participation in various learning experiences.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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