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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Noeleen Doherty, Shaun Tyson and Claire Viney

The management of the job‐loss situation is becoming of centralimportance to top management and human resource executives in thecurrent climate of redundancy. The current…

Abstract

The management of the job‐loss situation is becoming of central importance to top management and human resource executives in the current climate of redundancy. The current nature of severance packages and the provision of outplacement may be interpreted as a move towards normative practices within the policy making of many UK organizations. Reports on the results of a recent survey of over 600 UK organizations. The survey covered organizational perspectives on redundancies and the use of outplacement in the event of redundancy. The results indicated a change in corporate values in the 1990s. There appeared to be a move towards normative practices in the management of redundancy and in particular in the use of outplacement as a moderator of the potentially detrimental impact of the redundancy situation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Harry J. Martin and Dennis F. Lekan

Although outplacement consulting and career transition services have become a standard management practice and are almost universally provided when terminating executives…

2663

Abstract

Purpose

Although outplacement consulting and career transition services have become a standard management practice and are almost universally provided when terminating executives, these services have not been carefully evaluated and their benefits are not clearly understood. The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of individual differences in determining outplacement success using the Big Five framework as measured by the occupational personality questionnaire (OPQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The behavior of a sample of 53 executives was examined during outplacement as well as their success following reemployment.

Findings

The study's hypotheses were largely supported with agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience making a significant contribution to the understanding of outplacement effectiveness both during and after the transition.

Practical implications

These results suggest that providers should assess individual differences as part of career transition counseling and question recent trends toward making outplacement a commodity service. They also suggest that the diagnostic and counseling skills of a trained professional help to secure a successful outplacement experience and that the process should recognize the unique needs and personality of individual clients.

Originality/value

This paper considers the behavior of actual executives in career transition. It also extends previous research on the Big Five typology to executive outplacement and provides evidence of the usefulness of the OPQ as a measure of these personality traits.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Dorothea Alewell and Sven Hauff

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the determinants of employers' motives behind outplacement activities, the relationship between these motives, and the specific…

1748

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the determinants of employers' motives behind outplacement activities, the relationship between these motives, and the specific activities of firms in outplacement.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical assumptions were tested on a sample of 431 German firms, differentiating between specific outplacement activities and asking in detail about motives and rationales of outplacement. Factor analysis and Mann‐Whitney U‐Tests are applied.

Findings

Different types of motives can be identified and related to theoretical approaches. The relative importance of different motives is influenced by several situational and structural factors. The types of motives have an impact on the termination benefits offered to redundant employees.

Originality/value

Termination benefits are increasingly gaining importance, but the theoretical and empirical knowledge about the incidence, structure, motives, and effects of outplacement is still limited. This paper extends previous studies by shedding more light on the economic motives of employers to invest in outplacement activities, the determinants of these motives and the relationship between motives and specific bundles of activities.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Michael Carroll and Elizabeth Holloway

Draws distinction between the use of counselling skills, being aprofessional counsellor, and using professional counselling as one roleamong others, as a way of isolating…

Abstract

Draws distinction between the use of counselling skills, being a professional counsellor, and using professional counselling as one role among others, as a way of isolating the counselling content of outplacement consultancy. A matrix connecting five teaching strategies with five client needs is offered to clarify the role of counselling in outplacement work and as a possible training model for outplacement counsellors. Counselling is viewed as an essential component of good practice within outplacement agencies and can be utilized to help clients to work through their personal reactions to a number of areas connected to job‐loss.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Noeleen Doherty

Explores redundancy as a significant and pervasive outcome of organisational change. Argues that the need to manage the redundancy transition has provoked the development…

3866

Abstract

Explores redundancy as a significant and pervasive outcome of organisational change. Argues that the need to manage the redundancy transition has provoked the development of new HRM policies and practices. Highlights that interventions such as outplacement are often used by companies with little rigorous evaluation of their utility or benefit, yet their continued proliferation would suggest that they appear to have assumed intrinsic credibility and value. Maintains that while the pluralist, contingent nature of the organisational change and individual transition issues are recognised, many organisations appear to resort to normative methods when faced with the challenge of managing the human resource issues associated with redundancy. Argues that the pervasive and complex nature of current changes dictates not only the need for a better understanding of the practices that exist but also an exploration of how HRM theory can contribute to and enhance that understanding.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Joyce M. Scott and Brian H. Kleiner

Offers information to CPA firms which realize that restructuring and downsizing would be the prudent move for their client. Transition is the phase in which displaced…

531

Abstract

Offers information to CPA firms which realize that restructuring and downsizing would be the prudent move for their client. Transition is the phase in which displaced persons can move forward to address the situation. Outplacement provides the mechanism for communicating the methods and options to the individual or to help them through the period of adjustment. Discusses the changing nature of organizations dealing with the emotional impact of career job change and loss in the transition, a model for understanding loss, assessments in outplacement counselling, job search strategies, options for managers seeking re‐employment, how outplacement helps the individual, and beneficial services provided for every level of outplacement. Statistical results overwhelmingly show career growth for both men and women receiving outplacement services. Concludes, therefore, that CPA firms will want to consider an outplacement firm when restructuring and downsizing is the chosen option for revitalization of their client’s organization.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1993

Steve Worthington

Concerns the practice of “outplacement” as seen fromthe perspective of the individual who is a client and not from the pointof view of the agency offering the outplacement

513

Abstract

Concerns the practice of “outplacement” as seen from the perspective of the individual who is a client and not from the point of view of the agency offering the outplacement counselling. The views expressed and the information contained in the article will be of interest to those who wish to consider outplacement as part of any redundancy settlement. Besides discussing such outplacement issues as the leaving story (or your version of why you left your job), the curriculum vitae and how to assemble it, and the network of contacts and how to use them, also considers how best to use your counsellor, recruitment agencies and the wide range of other services that the outplacement agency can offer.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Hans De Witte, Jan Vandoorne, Roel Verlinden and Nele De Cuyper

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case…

1650

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case studies of companies, regarding interventions during organizational restructuring.

Design/methodology/approach

Comprises a literature review, qualitative (semi‐structured and in‐depth) interviews with workers and experts, and case studies of companies.

Findings

The literature on interventions suggests the importance of “traject‐counselling” for affected workers as a most valuable intervention during organizational restructuring. In‐depth interviews with job‐insecure workers highlight the importance of fair treatment, and especially of interactional justice. Case studies and interviews delineate the components that make re‐employment initiatives successful: outplacement interventions include emotional support, training of skills and individual coaching or guidance. Belgian legislation regarding outplacement and re‐employment initiatives is unique and extensive. Possible weaknesses, however, are the complexity of procedures, the unfamiliarity of the public with the legislation and the lack of legislation at an international level.

Research limitations/implications

The reported results are based on qualitative research only. In the future, quantitative evaluation studies need to be performed, in order to evaluate the outcomes of re‐employment initiatives and of the implemented legislation.

Practical implications

The results highlight the need for training of all partners involved in organizational restructuring: workers, managers and outplacement consultants.

Originality/value

This study offers the first integrated account of research results on measures needed to re‐employ workers during (and after) organizational restructuring in Belgium. Various methods (literature review, qualitative interviews and case studies) are used. The results include valuable suggestions for other European countries.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1985

Bob Crew

Utilising the outplacement policy, both sides win: the company because it is able to shed staff it finds too expensive and/or inessential, and employees because they can…

Abstract

Utilising the outplacement policy, both sides win: the company because it is able to shed staff it finds too expensive and/or inessential, and employees because they can find an equivalent, or better, job. Outplacement consultants offer external support to employers displacing staff, but can also work in‐house arranging company “job centres” which operate in the same way as government job centres for the unemployed. While in the US twice as many redundant executives reportedly receive outplacement treatment paid for by their employers, the trend is fast catching on in the UK. Those in difficulty will need more help from employers, through recognition of responsibilities in these areas and readiness to invest in outplacement and mid‐career counselling services for redundant and/or potentially redundant employees.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 85 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Dean R. DeGroot

International employment continues to grow for the industrializednations as their economies become more interdependent. An example ofthis trend involves Germany and the US…

816

Abstract

International employment continues to grow for the industrialized nations as their economies become more interdependent. An example of this trend involves Germany and the US employment and career issues which need to be considered when consulting abroad. Research was conducted in order to compare and contrast German and US outplacement/career practices. Specific interview impressions were gathered from several outplacement/career management professionals in Germany. Provides details about outplacement consulting services, differences in employee/career aspects between German and US employees, and the unique challenges faced by German employees. Although many outplacement services are similar between the two nations, German consultants appear to provide more of an “administrative” focus when working with German employees, whereas the US consulting firms provide more of a “sales” focus. German employees have historically had more employment protections than their counterpart US employees. However, political and economic changes in Germany are more volatile than those experienced in the USA. The “safety net” for German employees is beginning to crumble, and with these changes come insecurity and emotional distress. Knowledge of these nuances can assist career professionals in working with a German workforce.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

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