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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Richard Teare and DeMond Shondell Miller

Abstract

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Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

DeMond Shondell Miller

This paper provides a conclusion to the theme issue by commenting on the contributions made by the writing team. Moreover, this paper advocates the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a conclusion to the theme issue by commenting on the contributions made by the writing team. Moreover, this paper advocates the use of interdisciplinary teams to build resilience in the tourism and hospitality industries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on research and best practices cited in the preceding papers and offers viewpoints that link theory and practice.

Findings

Although there is no one specific way to summarize the contents of this theme issue, the findings build on the idea of forging trust and alliances to advance local and global resilience.

Originality/value

Post-disaster resilience is certainly relevant to the tourism and hospitality industries amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Findings and implications from this series of articles, interviews, and viewpoints can be used to aid the recovery of the tourism and hospitality industries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

DeMond Shondell Miller, Christopher Gonzalez and Mark Hutter

The purpose of this paper is to address the knowledge gap in the field of dark tourism by understanding the phenomena of phoenix tourism, which focuses on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the knowledge gap in the field of dark tourism by understanding the phenomena of phoenix tourism, which focuses on the transformation and rebirth of places following death and disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on existing theoretical understanding of dark tourism and disaster recovery to explore destination image recovery within the tourism industry. It uses phoenix tourism as a lens to understand the social, cultural and economic context of post-disaster tourism destination recovery and rebranding in the aftermath of the Indian Ocean Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.

Findings

A presentation of post-disaster strategies and recommendations are given with attention to the re-branding of images once associated with death and darkness to enhance a destination’s resilience.

Practical Implications

For local policymakers, tourism leaders, researchers and community developers, this research describes strategies that facilitate rebranding dark tourism sites, such as areas of rebirth or “phoenix tourism”, to enhance destination recovery image and to promote a more disaster- and risk-resilient tourism industry.

Originality/value

This paper bridges the knowledge gap by defining and contributing to the theoretical understanding of phoenix tourism as it identifies the what, how and why elements of the phenomena of phoenix tourism. Furthermore, the authors propose how to overcome negative destination images to preserve, present or redefine an image of a tourist destination “overcoming”, and eventual “rebirth” serves to re-calibrate resilience of the tourism industry and regional redevelopment.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Connor M. Chapman, DeMond Shondell Miller and Geremy Salley

The purpose of this study is to examine how societal disruptions in the wake of disasters and crises also disrupt the tourism and hospitality industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how societal disruptions in the wake of disasters and crises also disrupt the tourism and hospitality industries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a case-study approach. First, the literature on disasters/crises is reviewed; then three cases in which disasters impacted local, regional and global tourism and hospitality industries are examined: Hurricane Katrina, Arab Spring and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

Three principles are proposed to assist in mitigating the impacts of disaster on the tourist industry. These principles also serve as a means of potentially re-orienting and guiding the tourism and hospitality industries toward a sustainable and equitable future.

Originality/value

In addition to the three guiding principles offered in this paper; the examination of COVID-19 offers a novel case in which tourism is impacted globally by a singular disaster. Findings and implications from this case will guide recovery and, potentially, allow for a reconceptualization of the tourism and hospitality industries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

DeMond Shondell Miller

This paper aims to highlight the roles of sudden change and social disruption in the disaster landscape that shapes the environment of tourism destinations when hazards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the roles of sudden change and social disruption in the disaster landscape that shapes the environment of tourism destinations when hazards intersect with human systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the social science literature on disasters and crises. To this end, this paper provides an overview of the role abrupt changes have in transforming the tourism and hospitality industries.

Findings

This paper serves as a call to seek bold solutions that bring about industry best practices while fostering local community stakeholders in a more integrated way to build a more resilient future.

Originality/value

The disaster landscape provides opportunities to advance new structures, norms, cultural beliefs and collaborations that can foster resilience. This paper highlights the need to integrate resilience in the form of disaster management, recovery and organizational continuity strategies in the post-COVID-19 hospitality and tourism industries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Connor M. Chapman and DeMond Shondell Miller

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the framing of the emergency response to the novel coronavirus (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]; severe acute respiratory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the framing of the emergency response to the novel coronavirus (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]; severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronavirus [SARS-CoV-2]) in 2020 with wartime combat language. Metaphors have been used throughout American politics and society to frame perceived social problems, to both mobilize support and demobilize opposition. By simplifying and dichotomizing social problems, latent negative consequences frequently emerge, which tend to have a disproportionate impact on minority communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a case study and applied text from presidential press conferences and policy speeches from multiple sources on the War on Poverty, the War on Drugs and the War on COVID-19. The work identified common themes, actions and policies that can lead to other stakeholders adapting the “war” rhetoric.

Findings

An apparent cycle emerged – from disdain to metaphorical “war,” to policy, to law, to consequences and back to disdain – that fueled the American political system and, by extension, systematic oppression. The COVID-19 pandemic appears to be another crucible for this cycle to repeat itself. The series of examples illustrate how public leaders use the “war metaphor” as an all-out victory approach to galvanize policy responses to social issues, crises and natural disasters. By local, national and international stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study are the limited use of the metaphor and the time of completing this manuscript. The paper only views the presidential use and interpretation of the war metaphor. The COVID-19 pandemic disaster is persisting and the race for a vaccine is underway. While the authors present the immediate policy impacts, it is too early to understand the long-term policy impacts typically measured over decades.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to the literature by employing three case studies: the War on Poverty, the War on Drugs and the War on COVID-19 pandemic to draw comparisons between wartime rhetoric, social policies and the sociopolitical implications of those policies, as well as how these policies have the potential to disproportionately affect socially vulnerable populations.

Originality/value

This paper builds on research regarding the use of metaphor, this analysis bridges a knowledge gap by employing the COVID-19 case to the historical use of the war metaphor.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Paresh Wankhade and DeMond Shondell Miller

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Nese Dikmen, Soofia Tahira Elias-Ozkan and Colin Davidson

Earthquakes strike without warning, even though they are known to recur. It is nonetheless difficult to mobilize resources to plan for them in advance, despite the high…

Abstract

Earthquakes strike without warning, even though they are known to recur. It is nonetheless difficult to mobilize resources to plan for them in advance, despite the high social and economic costs that can be anticipated, and despite the humanitarian obligation to provide quality and safe housing.

This research examines two post-earthquake housing reconstruction projects in rural areas of Turkey, where different procurement strategies were used. A top-down strategy was adopted in Dinar after the October 1995 earthquake; and a bottom-up strategy, was adopted in the Orta district in Cankiri after the June 2000 earthquake in the region.

Based on information obtained from government agencies, building contractors and the projects beneficiaries, a comparison has been made between the two procurement methods. While no generalized conclusions can be drawn – as the projects were conducted in the particular circumstances that prevail in rural areas of Turkey – it is possible to highlight key factors that can properly influence future housing procurement processes.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

DeMond Shondell Miller

The paper's primary goals are three‐fold: to explore how disaster tourism serves as a vehicle for self‐reflection in respect to how the disaster tour affects the tourist;…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's primary goals are three‐fold: to explore how disaster tourism serves as a vehicle for self‐reflection in respect to how the disaster tour affects the tourist; to understand how cultures adapt to abrupt change; and to understand how the tourism industry can lead to the cultural and economic revitalization of devastated areas.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on sociological theory, experience, and participant observation to complete an autoethnographic study of a “disaster tour” in and around the New Orleans, Louisiana, metropolitan area.

Findings

Conveying information via auto‐ethnographic disaster tourism helps readers develop an understanding of others by being immersed in the tour experience. Placing the researchers in the midst of the analysis presents a perspective of the cultural mix of New Orleans as place set apart, even among places in the south. Finally, this study highlights the importance of a rapidly rebounding tourism industry by “branding” New Orleans as a “Come back city.”

Research limitations/implications

Because the research employs an auto‐ethnograpic approach, it may not be possible to duplicate the observations and findings, which are subject to the interpretations of the reader.

Originality/value

The contribution of this work to the literature is its highlighting of the flexibility of the tourism industry after a catastrophe and noting that tour guides frame the reconstruction process as “signs of hope” and “rebirth,” rather than a city in decline. Readers come to understand that the key to the revival of New Orleans is how disaster tourists understand the disaster as well as the recovery process.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

DeMond Shondell Miller

The purpose of this paper is to analyze public trust during the aftermath of technological and hybrid natural-technological/natech disasters – Hurricane Katrina (2005) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze public trust during the aftermath of technological and hybrid natural-technological/natech disasters – Hurricane Katrina (2005) and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown in Japan (2011). The work identifies common themes, actions and inactivity that can lead to citizens distrusting the government after disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

News reports from the two areas leading newspapers formed the body of the Hurricane Katrina and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown case studies. Of key interest were emerging themes of trust and/or distrust during the immediate impact phase of the disaster in addition to government failures and social breakdowns resulting in a loss of trust in government institutions and individual leaders.

Findings

The series of examples illustrate how specific action or in-action by local and federal governments served as a catalyst for a loss of trust in government institutions and individual leaders in government while proposing potential strategies to help public leaders reduce distrust during times of crisis.

Research limitations/implications

The two limitations were the use of only newspapers and the passage of a new law in 2013, the “Specially Designated Secrets Protection Law,” designed to limit news reporting of the press in Japan on the issue of nuclear radiation exposure of the general public in Japan, some of the new data are not available.

Practical implications

The research concludes by offering specific ways to regain trust after a perception of failure during pre- and post-disaster management in the age of mega disasters. The paper lists several recommendations that can be practically implemented to develop a culture of transparent communication, civic engagement in planning processes and inspire trust among stakeholders.

Originality/value

While the paper identifies barriers to establishing trust among government agencies, the citizenry and private industry, it seeks to help inform policy frameworks regarding the importance of the government’s ability to sustain a strong sense of trust that engenders civic participation in preserving or regaining trust in the aftermath of disasters.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 36 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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