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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nelson Oly Ndubisi and Nnaemeka C. Chukwunonso

Environmentalists, researchers, policy makers, governments, and the general public have frequently expressed the concern for the depleting state of the environment. As a…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmentalists, researchers, policy makers, governments, and the general public have frequently expressed the concern for the depleting state of the environment. As a panacea, many governments have called on organizations and individuals to pay greater interest in landscaping and embark on landscaping projects through planting trees, shrubs, flowers, and grasses in their immediate and distant environments. Through landscaping, the greenery, beauty, and scenic architecture of a place are preserved. This research, therefore, aims to evaluate landscaping adoption and adoption determinants by Malaysian and Nigerian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of organizational buying behavior and the innovation diffusion theory, a list of potential facilitators of landscaping adoption was derived and used as the basis for collecting data from the organizations. These data were factor analyzed to determine the key dimensions of facilitators for landscaping adoption. On the basis of the resulting dimensions, discriminant analysis was conducted to identify the factors that are sufficient in discriminating between the organizations that have adopted landscaping (adopters) and those that have not done so (non‐adopters).

Findings

The results show that organizational factors such as environmental sensitivity of the firm, organization's size, organization's people, and cost implication, as well as innovation characteristics, namely relative advantage, compatibility, and complexity, are significantly sufficient for discriminating between adopters and non‐adopters. An organization's structure and divisibility are not significant determinants.

Practical implications

The finding of this research is beneficial in designing strategies for the protection and enhancement of the greenery and beauty of the environment, and for overall environmental management.

Originality/value

The outcome of this research provides valuable pioneer information on factors that discriminate between organizational adopters and non‐adopters of landscaping in Malaysia and Nigeria that can be used to enhance landscaping diffusion and overall environmental management.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Matthias Heinicke

– Against the background of alternative sources for feeding biogas plants, this paper aims to consider a utilization of landscaping waste as alternative to common crops.

Abstract

Purpose

Against the background of alternative sources for feeding biogas plants, this paper aims to consider a utilization of landscaping waste as alternative to common crops.

Design/methodology/approach

In consideration of survey data, a robust framework is proposed based on characterizations of source and sink to meet the requirements of both sides reliably. Depending on available data and further surveys, a level of detail approach of a biomass supply chain is conducted in this regard.

Findings

In this context, different types of landscaping waste suitable for both biogas generation and incineration were defined. With respect to the sporadically minor quantities of landscaping waste, minor capacity load in terms of transportation is one crucial factor within an entire concept of logistics.

Practical implications

Due to the arising cost function, possibilities and needs of utilizing landscaping waste for alternative energy generation in biogas plants and incineration plants are drawn.

Originality/value

Moreover, economic and technological challenges concerning a utilization of landscaping waste in biogas plants are systematically revealed. Thus, technological processes in biogas plants were considered from a managerial point of view. The characteristics of rotting biomass in terms of its shelf life are considered additionally to ensure the required quality of input material particularly for the process of biogas generation.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Ali Masoudi, Elizabeth Cudney and Kioumars Paryani

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the quality function deployment (QFD) process can be applied to capture and translate spoken and unspoken customer…

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2260

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the quality function deployment (QFD) process can be applied to capture and translate spoken and unspoken customer requirements into actionable service features in a hotel landscaping design case.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was undertaken with the aim of showing how the QFD methodology could be used to design hotel landscaping. The methodology is a customer‐driven process which integrates customer requirements into every aspect of the design and delivery of products and services. Understanding what the customer desires from a product or service is crucial to the successful design and development of new products and services.

Findings

This research illustrates that quality improvement projects can benefit from the QFD process to connect customer requirements to the internal procedures of the organization to exceed customer expectations and create a brand identity. This paper can be used as a case study to demonstrate how the QFD process can be effectively applied in the design of hotel landscaping or similar cases in other services.

Originality/value

The literature regarding the application of the QFD process in the hotel and hospitality industry is limited, let alone the application of this process in hotel landscaping design. Hence, the shortage of QFD application in the hotel landscaping design has motivated this unique study of applying the QFD process to landscaping design.

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Case study
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Minnette A. Bumpus and Nikita Floyd

The case should be introduced after students have been exposed to the following topics: the practice of entrepreneurship, opportunity recognition, market segmentation and…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The case should be introduced after students have been exposed to the following topics: the practice of entrepreneurship, opportunity recognition, market segmentation and minority business enterprise.

Research methodology

The names of the companies and individuals in this descriptive case have not been disguised, with the exception of the solar company representative and his company affiliation. Information was obtained from interviews (i.e. first-hand accounts) with Nikita Floyd, President and Owner of Green Forever Landscaping and Design, Inc., and secondary sources cited.

Case overview/synopsis

Nikita, a 50-year old, African American male, had grown his business from a one-person seasonal landscaping business to a year-round landscaping and design business with full-time, part-time, and seasonal employees and an array of services and customer segments. To his delight, he was able to unite his avocation with his vocation. With over 30 years of experience in landscaping and landscape design Nikita was always scanning the landscape for new business opportunities that would align with his company’s mission statement and help sustain Green Forever’s core business.

Complexity academic level

This case is most appropriate for introductory undergraduate and graduate level courses in entrepreneurship.

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Jennifer M. Mower, Minjeong Kim and Michelle L. Childs

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external…

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8428

Abstract

Purpose

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external atmospheric variables, specifically window displays and landscaping (i.e., accessory vegetation), on customers’ responses towards an apparel boutique.

Design/methodology/approach

The Stimulus‐Organism‐Response (S‐O‐R) model proposed by Mehrabian and Russell provided the theoretical framework. Data were collected from students enrolled at an American university. Univariate analyses and simple regression analyses were used to evaluate the influence of two external variables (window display and landscaping) on consumer responses in terms of liking, mood, and patronage intentions.

Findings

Results indicated that window display and landscaping had no main effects on pleasure or arousal. However, the presence of window display and landscaping influenced respondents’ liking of the store exterior and patronage intentions. Additionally, consumers’ liking of the store exterior and mood positively influenced patronage intentions.

Practical implications

Store retailers, especially small apparel boutiques, would benefit from landscaping the external portion of their store and pay special attention to their window displays.

Originality/value

Turley and Milliman stressed the pressing need for further empirical research on external atmospheric variables because of lack of research on exterior atmospheric variables. This study focused on external atmospheric variables and their impact on shopper behaviors and thus adds to the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Md. Nazmul Haque, Mustafa Saroar, Md. Abdul Fattah and Syed Riad Morshed

Public-Private Partnership (PPP) is a common practice in both the public and private sectors. PPP has been an important instrument to achieve Sustainable Development Goals…

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1303

Abstract

Purpose

Public-Private Partnership (PPP) is a common practice in both the public and private sectors. PPP has been an important instrument to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the national level. However, the role of PPP at the subnational level is often scarcely studied. Using Khulna city of Bangladesh as a case, this paper aims to assess the role of PPP projects in the attainment of SDGs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in the Central Business District (CBD) of Khulna, on a total of 4.6 kilometers stretches of road medians in the CBD where landscaping was done through the PPP approach. Besides the collection of secondary data from official records, primary data were collected through site visits, field surveys and interviews of PPP project partners.

Findings

The result shows that 89 percent of the respondents (road users) were pleased with the landscaping done on the road medians. Similarly, about 86 percent of the respondents felt more comfortable and safer to use the roads. Well-maintained road medians allow road-crossing at a regular interval which reduces the chance of an accident. The private parties have installed promotional billboards on the road medians and saved BDT 10.82 million a year. The public authority saves the maintenance budget amounting to BDT 23 million a year. The project achieves a triple-win situation. Despite some limitations, this PPP project has taken Khulna a step forward to achieve SDGs.

Originality/value

The findings have policy implications as the PPP project has enhanced the resilience of Khulna by addressing the relevant SDGs.

Details

Public Administration and Policy, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Brian Kermath

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that campus and urban landscaping has important connections to biodiversity conservation, perceptions of natural heritage…

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2358

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that campus and urban landscaping has important connections to biodiversity conservation, perceptions of natural heritage, sense‐of‐place, ecological literacy and the role of campus landscapes in the larger community. It also aims to show how campus landscapes express values and perform as a teaching, research and outreach resource.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was written as a literature review applied to a case study. Drawing on E.O. Wilson's idea that society must assign the same value to natural heritage as it does cultural heritage to successfully safeguard biodiversity for the long haul, the paper argues that by altering key elements of human landscapes in strategic places – campus landscapes in this case – to reflect a deep appreciation of natural heritage, we can help shift worldviews to foster real sustainability. It also raises a set of questions based on popular perceptions and some challenges based on the broad literature, then shows how the case study performed in addressing the questions and meeting the challenges.

Findings

Stetson University's project helped push the campus' nascent green movement beyond the remedial and reactive approaches too often seen in most regions to a proactive, holistic campaign.

Practical implications

The paper should inspire other campuses and organizations to proactively manage landscapes for natural heritage education, biodiversity conservation, and sustainability, just as the featured case study has done in its larger community.

Originality/value

In the world of campus sustainability, biodiversity often takes a backseat to energy use, resource consumption and waste management. The paper calls attention to this shortcoming and in so doing hopefully will encourage research and applied projects to address the biodiversity crisis and the role that universities play.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Ngoako Solomon Marutha

The paper sought to investigate the landscaping of electronic system through the use of the functional patient’s records management activities. The rationale is to share…

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1487

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sought to investigate the landscaping of electronic system through the use of the functional patient’s records management activities. The rationale is to share views and guide organisations that are struggling with providing specification for a functional records management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used qualitative approach to apply the literature in supporting the views about landscaping electronic system using functional patient’s records management activities.

Findings

The study revealed that without consideration of records management activities the likelihood is that the system may be not properly functional. The best way to landscape electronic system for records management is using records management activities. This will assist in avoiding critical omission for inclusion of all records management system operational activities.

Originality/value

The paper is proposing a new way of landscaping the electronic system by using the records management functional activities. It also provides a framework to guide the implementers or electronic system developers. The paper was partially extracted from the author’s Ph.D. thesis completed in 2016, to develop a framework for landscaping the electronic system by using the records management functional activities.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Zororo Muranda and Peter Lewa

Entrepreneurship and small business formation.

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship and small business formation.

Study level/applicability

BA (Entrepreneurship); BA (Small Business Formation); BA (Management).

Case overview

Owing to youth unemployment in sub-Saharan economies, youth entrepreneurship is now a major policy alternative across the subcontinent. It is also an immediate alternative for unemployed school drop-outs. Botswana is encouraging youth entrepreneurship through funding youth projects as an intervention. This case study presents decision alternatives considered by young adults when thinking about the future – to proceed with school or to start their own business. The other set of decision alternatives is which business idea to pursue – turning a hobby into a business opportunity or pursuing a new opportunity altogether. Mr Supang, owner of Swanscapes (Pty) Ltd, has to debate these decision alternatives with himself. Swanscape has to contend with a growing market but is unsure of where to get expansion finance. With expansion finance having been availed, managerial skills limitations will have to be dealt with. The company should focus on three other very important decisions: how to compete with large contractors currently dominant in the market and other small businesses that have recently entered the market in flower pot production; how to develop own skills and those of employees; and finally how to grow the business. Swanscapes remains hamstrung with the decision of which mode of growth strategy to adopt.

Expected learning outcomes

The goal of this case study is to illustrate the tough decision alternatives unemployed youth starting their own small businesses have to juggle with. The case also illustrates the hurdles novice entrepreneurs have to contend with in order to establish a brand for their product or service. It also illustrates the impact of inadequate managerial and technical skills on growth strategies an owner may have.

Supplementary learning materials

Teaching notes are available. Please consult your librarian for access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1967

T.A. SCRUTTON

Office landscaping eliminates the numerous little boxes which often constitute an office system, saves duplication of numerous services and overcomes barriers to effective…

Abstract

Office landscaping eliminates the numerous little boxes which often constitute an office system, saves duplication of numerous services and overcomes barriers to effective information and communication systems. In this article, T. A. Scrutton, Director and Secretary of Beecham Products, answers questions on why Beechams established several landscaped offices experimentally and what it has achieved so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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