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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

David Robotham

The article proposes a means for optimising learning through a framework developed from two complementary areas: learning theory and the competence movement. The central proposal…

7749

Abstract

The article proposes a means for optimising learning through a framework developed from two complementary areas: learning theory and the competence movement. The central proposal is that in order to maximise learning during training there is a need to take into consideration an individual’s learning ability. However, improving learning ability requires more than simply seeking to develop study skills. Effective learning involves the development of deeper learning abilities such as critical thinking and identifying the links between different bodies of knowledge. There is also an associated need to examine the knowledge individuals already possess. The article proposes a framework for developing competence in learning and considers the implications for training in adopting such an approach.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

David Robotham

The article proposes a means for optimising the effectiveness of training through a framework developed from two complementary areas; learning theory and competence. The central…

5679

Abstract

The article proposes a means for optimising the effectiveness of training through a framework developed from two complementary areas; learning theory and competence. The central proposal is that in order to maximise benefits from training there is a need to consider individual’s learning ability. However, improving learning ability requires more than simply seeking to develop study skills. Effective learning involves the development of deeper learning abilities such as critical thinking and identifying the links between different bodies of knowledge. There is also an associated need to examine the knowledge individuals already possess prior to embarking on any further training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

David Robotham and Richard Jubb

Explains that the concept of competences is being used widely in the sphere of management development as a means for measuring the performance of individuals. This growth in use…

2465

Abstract

Explains that the concept of competences is being used widely in the sphere of management development as a means for measuring the performance of individuals. This growth in use has taken place without establishing exactly what organizations are referring to when using the term “competence”. There has also been an assumption that competence can be measured. It is suggested that, given the wide range of activities which the term “management” can be said to encompass, it may be inappropriate to define management in terms of a limited range of activities. The competence approach also implies that the type of lists of skills developed is a correct list which can be applied in different industries. Given that there is no such thing as a generic manager, but rather individuals who are effective in different sectors, the competence approach would appear to be fundamentally flawed.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

David Robotham

The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part‐time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part‐time employment…

15137

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part‐time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part‐time employment among university students. The research examined the possible consequences of combining part‐time employment with full‐time study, with particular reference to stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consisted of an institution‐wide Web‐based survey of full‐time undergraduates within a post‐1992 university in the UK.

Findings

The survey found that part‐time employment, in common with many previous studies, is a majority experience for full‐time undergraduates. It also found that some students were spending longer in their chosen employment than in time‐tabled classes. A central finding was that unlike much previous research, it emerged here that students reported more positive than negative outcomes.

Practical implications

The data shows that students continue to engage in part‐time employment at a significant level and for some studying is almost a secondary activity. This perhaps raises questions about the existing model of higher education delivery and the need for institutions to consider offering more support mechanisms for individual students.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in seeking to clarify the nature of the consequences for students seeking to combine employment and studying. Furthermore the paper builds on our understanding of the continuing growth of student part‐time employment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

David Robotham

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a survey of part‐time employment among university students. The survey seeks to establish the nature and characteristics of…

6001

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a survey of part‐time employment among university students. The survey seeks to establish the nature and characteristics of that employment, and to determine the extent to which it is comparable to similar institutions. The research also aims to examine the possible consequences of combining part‐time employment with full‐time study, with particular reference to stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consisted of a web‐based survey of full‐time undergraduates within the business school of a post‐1992 university in the UK.

Findings

The survey found that 68 per cent of the sample currently holds at least one part‐time job during term‐time and that the majority are employed in excess of ten hours per week. Employment is concentrated in a small number of sectors such as retailing, service and call centres. Previous studies report that combining a degree with employment can have negative consequences with students missing classes, doing less reading and experiencing higher levels of stress.

Practical implications

The growth of student employment is eroding further the concept of the full‐time student and universities may need to consider adaptations to their current programmes to accommodate students. From a recruitment and retention perspective, institutions may also need to consider the mechanisms they can offer to support students working part‐time.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in adding to the existing knowledge base about student part‐time employment, which continues to be a growing phenomenon. It also sheds further light on the consequences of working while studying and the negative outcomes that may arise. In particular it examines the relationship between part‐time employment and stress.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

David Robotham

The learning style of individuals can be an important considerationfor trainers in looking to optimize the effectiveness of training.Explores the usefulness of the learning styles…

3667

Abstract

The learning style of individuals can be an important consideration for trainers in looking to optimize the effectiveness of training. Explores the usefulness of the learning styles approach for trainers. Considers whether training style should be matched with learning style within a training programme. Suggests that self‐direction in learning may be a more appropriate approach in developing skills beyond the confines of a training programme. Outlines a framework for trainers to consider in increasing learner self‐direction, and identifies key factors that should be taken into consideration.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Richard Jubb and David Robotham

The use of competences has proved to be perhaps the major growth area in management development during the last ten years. An increasing number of organizations have looked to…

1768

Abstract

The use of competences has proved to be perhaps the major growth area in management development during the last ten years. An increasing number of organizations have looked to competence‐based training as the solution to enhancing the performance of their managers. But there remain several fundamental weaknesses that supporters of competences have yet to counter adequately. Identifies and challenges the dominant myths behind the competence approach, the suggestion being that it is perhaps time to stop and evaluate the usefulness of competence‐based training in more depth.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Martin McCracken

136

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Central to any training and development initiative is the extent to which learners actually engage in effective learning. Effective learning requires much more than the ability to…

2051

Abstract

Central to any training and development initiative is the extent to which learners actually engage in effective learning. Effective learning requires much more than the ability to perform particular learning process elements; it should be concerned with the learning of organized “wholes” of knowledge. In addition, the process should require that information is properly applied – in other words, effective learning needs to achieve transference of knowledge from the artificiality of a training course to practical application in the workplace.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Ron Iphofen

359

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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