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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Sara Ann McComb, Melissa Woodard Barringer and Kristina A Bourne

Part-time employment is a vital portion of the U.S. labor force, yet research to date has provided only limited insights into how to successfully create and manage this…

Abstract

Part-time employment is a vital portion of the U.S. labor force, yet research to date has provided only limited insights into how to successfully create and manage this sector of the workforce. We propose that these limitations are due, at least in part, to an inadequate explication of the levels issues inherent in this area. In this article, we present a summary framework of constructs at the economic, industry, organization, individual, and work levels that influence part-time work arrangements. We then specify a cross-level moderator model that examines how the number of hours worked by employees influences their attitudes and behaviors. We posit that this relationship is moderated by a number of contextual effects at multiple levels. Using this sample model, we demonstrate the way in which researchers examining part-time work arrangements can effectively address levels issues. Our article concludes with a discussion of the implications that this summary framework has for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.

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Multi-level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-269-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Eileen Drew

The subject of parttime work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of…

Abstract

The subject of parttime work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It is estimated that in 1970, average annual hours worked per employee amounted to only 60% of those for 1870. Two major factors are attributed to explaining the underlying trend towards a reduction in working time: (a) the increase in the number of voluntary parttime employees and (b) the decrease in average annual number of days worked per employee (Kok and de Neubourg, 1986). The authors noted that the growth rate of parttime employment in many countries was greater than the corresponding rate of growth in full‐time employment.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 9 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Jennifer Tomlinson

This purpose of this paper it to explore the extent to which female parttime workers experience occupational mobility in UK service sector firms, particularly promotional…

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Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper it to explore the extent to which female parttime workers experience occupational mobility in UK service sector firms, particularly promotional opportunities, since the implementation of the Parttime Workers' Directive in 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a qualitative methodology. In‐depth interviews were carried out with 62 women and 12 of their managers in five case study workplaces in the service industry, so as to better understand individuals' perceptions of parttime work and the processes that shape parttime working at an organisational level.

Findings

The findings are not particularly encouraging in terms of female parttime workers' perceptions of their opportunities for career progression in four of the five case studies. Distinctions were found between legislation, organisational policies and informal workplace practices. It is argued in this paper that each of these levels is important in understanding patterns of change and continuity in the use and structuring of parttime work.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in its use of occupational closure to explain the stratification of parttime workers and this paper has significance and value for debates surrounding the progression and career prospects of non‐standard workers and diversity management more broadly.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Kaye Broadbent

Increases in the number of jobs for parttime workers has had little impact on the rate of unionisation for parttime workers, the majority of whom are women. The argument…

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Abstract

Increases in the number of jobs for parttime workers has had little impact on the rate of unionisation for parttime workers, the majority of whom are women. The argument run by union officials in Japan is that women, and thus parttime workers, are not interested in industrial issues. This study explores an alternative explanation which is that union officials and “core” male workers are excluding women and parttime workers in order to protect their own privileged position. Whilst it is acknowledged that the organisational structure of enterprise unions makes it difficult to incorporate the needs of parttime workers, it is the attitudes of “core” male workers and union officials to women as paid workers that is the major hurdle to the non‐unionisation of parttime workers. For women and parttime workers there is no power in the union.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Jo Carby‐Hall

Discusses the long existing and confusing problems of establishing the relationship of who is, and who if not, a dependent worker. Reflects developments which have…

Abstract

Discusses the long existing and confusing problems of establishing the relationship of who is, and who if not, a dependent worker. Reflects developments which have occurred in British law as it affects the employment field, plus an evaluation and analysis of some of the different types of employment relationships which have evolved by examining, where possible, the status of each of these relationships. Concludes that the typical worker nowadays finds himself in a vulnerable position both economically and psychologically owing to the insecurity which exists.

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Managerial Law, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

John Burgess

As with many other OECD economies, a growing parttime employment share has been a characteristic of the Australian workforce experience over the past three decades…

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Abstract

As with many other OECD economies, a growing parttime employment share has been a characteristic of the Australian workforce experience over the past three decades. Examines several distinctive features of Australian parttime employment, namely: the high proportion of parttime employees who are employed under casual employment conditions, the growing male parttime employment share and the growing proportion of involuntary parttime workers. Outlines several important policy implications, namely: many parttime employees are entitled to but not receiving permanent employment conditions; many part‐timers are excluded from the many non‐wage entitlements associated with full‐time employment; adjusted hourly wage rates for parttime workers appear to be falling relative to full‐time workers, the ability of parttime employees to participate in the newly emerging collective bargaining framework is constrained by their very low trade union density relative to full‐time employees; and there are doubts as to how parttime workers can effectively participate in and benefit from the emerging programme of employee‐based superannuation entitlements.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Jo Carby‐Hall

This “Rapport” proposes to examine the function and effect of British social law in the context of the employment/unemployment debate. This debate is a most significant…

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159

Abstract

This “Rapport” proposes to examine the function and effect of British social law in the context of the employment/unemployment debate. This debate is a most significant one for it has not only British, but also European and International dimensions.

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Managerial Law, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Kaye Broadbent

Parttime work in Japan, as in other countries, is increasing as a form of paid work. There are, however, significant differences developing out of Japan’s gender…

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1143

Abstract

Parttime work in Japan, as in other countries, is increasing as a form of paid work. There are, however, significant differences developing out of Japan’s gender contract. Employers have created a gendered employment strategy which has been supported by governments, through social welfare policies and legislation, and the mainstream enterprise union movement which has supported categorisations of parttime workers as “auxilliary” despite their importance at the workplace. An analysis of one national supermarket chain indicates that parttime work as it is constructed in Japan does not challenge the gendered division of labour but seeks to lock women into the secondary labour market.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Masao Yamaguchi

Recent empirical studies have improved methodologies for identifying the causal effects of policies especially on a minimum wage hike. This study identifies causal effects…

Abstract

Recent empirical studies have improved methodologies for identifying the causal effects of policies especially on a minimum wage hike. This study identifies causal effects of minimum wage hikes across 47 prefectures in Japan from 2008 to 2010 on employment, average hourly wage, work hours, full-time equivalent employment (FTE), total wage costs, average tenure, separation and new hiring in establishments using a micro dataset of business establishments in restaurant, accommodation, and food takeout and delivery industry. Various regression specifications including controls for time-varying regional heterogeneity are implemented by using the bite of the minimum wage in each establishment. First, this study finds that the effects of a revision of minimum wage on employment and FTE in the establishment are statistically insignificant, but the effects on hourly wages and total wage costs are statistically significant. Subsequently, it considers how the establishments react to the increase in total wage costs caused by the revised minimum wage, and finds that separation from the establishment may decrease, and average tenure of workers may increase.

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Change at Home, in the Labor Market, and On the Job
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-933-5

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