Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

David Morrison and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Dave Morrison.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Dave Morrison.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case study, Dave provides a short biography of his background and is then interviewed by Jerome.

Findings

Dave has had two careers. The first as a scaffolder. The second as a nursing assistant in mental health services. He has ended up bruised and battered in both.

Research limitations/implications

Every case study tells a different story. The effects of stress can be cumulative.

Practical implications

There are many accounts of how hospitalisation has traumatised service users. Yet, working in these services can also be traumatic for the care staff.

Social implications

Professor Tony Butterworth used to say “Happy nurse equals happy patient”. If you look after staff needs, they will provide better care. Have we ever really looked after the needs of mental health-care staff?

Originality/value

Dave’s story is unique. As Nicola Adams says, “Fall down eight times, get up nine”. Dave has fallen down many more times than this. Eventually, it gets harder to get back up.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Adrian Slywotzky and David Morrison

Many senior executives equate “going digital” with specific phenomena such as the advent of the personal computer, the proliferation of e‐mail, the growth of enterprise…

Downloads
2685

Abstract

Many senior executives equate “going digital” with specific phenomena such as the advent of the personal computer, the proliferation of e‐mail, the growth of enterprise resource planning systems, or the popularity of the Internet. But to think of digital business design as the sum total of the high‐tech innovations multiplying around us is a fatally incomplete view. The discipline of digital business design is about serving customers, creating unique value propositions, leveraging talent, achieving order‐of‐magnitude improvements in productivity, and increasing and protecting profits. Learn from the companies that have created great value propositions for customers and employees, achieved significant improvements in productivity, created a robust profit model, and protected both their profit streams and their customer relationships from being eroded by competitors.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

DANIEL HAY

Recently I remarked that my collection of Caithnessiana is diminishing to the point of invisibility, but no longer had that been said than a copy of David Morrison's The

Abstract

Recently I remarked that my collection of Caithnessiana is diminishing to the point of invisibility, but no longer had that been said than a copy of David Morrison's The idealist landed on my desk and reopened the whole question of what is happening on the literary scene in the far North. More, in fact than I had suspected. Some of it stems from atomic energy at Dounreay and the growth of Thurso as a dormitory for the Dounreay staff.

Details

Library Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Expert briefing
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Morrison takes over from Malcolm Turnbull, who has also resigned his parliamentary seat.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

David Scherl, David Barnett and David Lerner

On October 26, 2004 the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) adopted new rules and rule amendments under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”…

Abstract

On October 26, 2004 the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) adopted new rules and rule amendments under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”) that will require most hedge fund managers to register with the SEC as investment advisers by February 1, 2006. The actions taken by the SEC will necessitate that hedge fund managers begin preparing for SEC registration at least four to six months in advance of registration. In light of these new rules, this article summarizes: The significant provisions of the Advisers Act that hedge fund managers will need to become familiar with; The SEC registration process that a hedge fund adviser will have to follow; The SEC inspection program and some practical tips that hedge fund advisers should consider implementing. Because the regulatory framework imposes a variety of obligations and prohibitions on hedge fund managers, who, up until now, have operated without significant regulatory oversight, we recommend that fund managers who are likely to become subject to the registration rules should, well in advance of the February 1, 2006 registration deadline, familiarize themselves with the legal and operational changes that will affect them and assemble the information they will need to commence and complete the registration process. This article is designed to introduce fund managers to that framework.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

David Docherty and David Morrison

In May 1988, the Home Secretary announced the establishment of the Broadcasting Standards Council. The new eight‐person Council is chaired by Lord Rees‐Mogg. As well as…

Abstract

In May 1988, the Home Secretary announced the establishment of the Broadcasting Standards Council. The new eight‐person Council is chaired by Lord Rees‐Mogg. As well as its responsibilities for monitoring broadcasts and dealing with complaints, the Council was invited by the Home Secretary to draw up a code of practice on the portrayal of violence and sex and of standards of taste and decency, and to undertake research on matters such as the nature and effect on attitudes and behaviour of the portrayal of violence and of sex on television, radio and video.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Adrian Slywotzky and David Morrison

Downloads
193

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2004

Erin Murphy

In Dr. Norman Denzin’s graduate seminar “Interpretive Interaction,” the semester was spent reading, discussing, and debating various methods proposed as alternatives to…

Abstract

In Dr. Norman Denzin’s graduate seminar “Interpretive Interaction,” the semester was spent reading, discussing, and debating various methods proposed as alternatives to the constraints and false promises of the “scientific” methods often taught in home departments. The class experience is, therefore, open to experimental ideas and formats while working toward one’s preparation for the final performance that uses a method discussed in class. Dr. Denzin’s task for us was to use an epiphanic experience having to do with race as a point of inspiration for our pedagogical performance texts. Having been much influenced by the critical study of whiteness by intellectuals like James Baldwin, W. E. B. Dubois, Toni Morrison, David Roediger, Franz Fanon, and bell hooks my text was fundamentally informed by their messages: whiteness is problematic for people of color as well as whites in that it creates false distinctions and categories preventing us from seeing each other, let alone ourselves. This creates an asymmetric relationship of power between races often resulting in violence (both physical and psychological), reinforcing historical structural inequalities or creations of new ones, and inherent essentialist rifts in perceptions between races.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-261-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Anne Norris, Deborah Saber, David Morrison, Daven Morrison and Greg Trompeter

The purpose of this study is to identify a psychological profile for public accounting firm partners who are likely to place the partnership and client shareholder at…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify a psychological profile for public accounting firm partners who are likely to place the partnership and client shareholder at risk. Proprietary data from an executive counseling firm provided a unique opportunity to compare two groups of partners: those identified by their senior partners as placing the firm at risk (n=31) and those not so identified (n=64). The groups were compared using psychological measures, lifestyle measures, personal measures, and work history variables. Results found no significant measurable difference between the audit partners who were identified as posing a risk and those not so identified. This suggests that specific factors cannot lead a partner to engage in risky behaviors, but rather several, in combination, may be necessary. Implications for research include learning more about concepts such as resistance to temptation, motivation, and rationalization. Implications for practice are to focus on structuring business practices to provide early warning signs and minimize opportunities to engage in risky behavior. Continued and increased diligence in the client screening and client continuation and review process remain essential for best practices.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-086-5

1 – 10 of over 1000