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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2022

David D. Chrislip, David MacPhee and Patti Schmitt

Some communities in the USA are remarkably better at responding to civic challenges than others. These communities are more competent at marshaling their resources – material and…

Abstract

Purpose

Some communities in the USA are remarkably better at responding to civic challenges than others. These communities are more competent at marshaling their resources – material and human – in service of their own needs. The authors’ purpose in this paper is to enhance their collective understanding of ideas related to community-driven change and to describe the development of a civic capacity index (CCI), a measure of a community's capacity to respond to civic challenges and disruptions like COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a concept mapping process (akin to grounded theory) to develop the CCI. Using this process, a panel of 34 scholars and practitioners of civic leadership and civic engagement worked together to create measurable descriptors of civic capacity.

Findings

The CCI measures dynamic processes related to collective leadership, inclusion of diverse voices, how institutions and coalitions address shared challenges and collaboration among community members. Sample data from several states show the CCI's scales to have high internal reliabilities and to correlate strongly with validation scales such as collective efficacy, social justice and community connectedness. Confirmatory factor analyses support a bifactor model of a general CCI factor and six CCI scales.

Practical implications

With the help of the CCI, civic actors can take advantage of existing civic capacity, understand where it is lacking and build resilience for the future.

Originality/value

To date, most scholars have used qualitative research to determine the elements of civic capacity. The authors wanted to know what civic capacity looks like in sufficient detail to assess the extent to which it is present or not in a community. Other efforts to quantify or assess civic capacity or related ideas are less comprehensive or lack the specificity to provide guidance for building and mobilizing it in communities. This work enhances our understanding of leadership in the civic arena, a little understood aspect of leadership studies.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

John P. Dentico

We live in a postindustrial/knowledge‐based society, the ramifications of which are transforming both manufacturing and service‐based organizations in the public and private…

1486

Abstract

We live in a postindustrial/knowledge‐based society, the ramifications of which are transforming both manufacturing and service‐based organizations in the public and private sectors. The industrial models of leadership which were often autocratic and compliance demanding, are incongruent with the needs of people who search for intrinsic satisfaction from daily activities in an environment of rapid complex change, turbulence, ambiguity, diversity of interests, and information overload. New models of leadership such as post‐industrial, post‐heroic, collaborative, and critical theory, offer some measure of congruence with our postindustrial society. These models provide coherence with new organizational philosophies such as the learning organization. Building bridges or “microworlds” which provide a way in which leaders can investigate, analyze, interpret and build confidence in new models of leadership and the principles of the learning organization, are vitally important to the future of organizations and communities. Realistic, custom designed, table top, non‐computer‐based simulations, such as LeadSimm can be used to build such bridges.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Vijay Reddy

This chapter presents insights about prospective students’ information experience when using social media to support their decision-making concerning which university to attend…

Abstract

This chapter presents insights about prospective students’ information experience when using social media to support their decision-making concerning which university to attend. When choosing a university, prospective students experience different ways of using information, engaging with a variety of sources, which have changed rapidly from traditional print and mass media, exhibitions and road shows, to the Internet and university websites. Increasingly, prospective students use information via diverse social media platforms where they can engage, participate and collaborate as information users on the social web. As a result, their information experience is expanding beyond information seeking to engagement with social media and participation in a dynamic online community.

Drawing on a literature review and my own research, I demonstrate that prospective students’ information experience involves collaboration, engagement and communities via social media. I present findings that contrast prospective students’ dynamic and wider multidimensional information experience of the social web, with static and unidimensional information seeking of traditional sources. In particular, I demonstrate that prospective students can now ‘experience’ the university and seek peer advice by collaborating in online communities. In this way, they gain tangible as well as intangible university information.

Details

Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2024

Lucas Díaz

Abstract

Details

The Know-How of Public Leaders in Collective Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-354-5

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 May 2017

Mitsuru Kodama

Abstract

Details

Developing Holistic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-421-7

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Jay D. Jurie

Public administration and organization management features numerous references to the development and maturation of individuals within organizations not only as a means of…

3583

Abstract

Public administration and organization management features numerous references to the development and maturation of individuals within organizations not only as a means of self‐fulfillment but also as a primary component of meeting the larger goals of the organization. Successful articulation of individual needs, theory, practice, and programmatic objectives requires the maturation of the organization as a “competent” entity capable of providing enhanced opportunities for the development of individual potential as well as stakeholder and client satisfaction. Organizations building competence seek to synthesize effective management theory and quality of service delivery within a procedural framework which interrelates unsublimated needs satisfaction, management practice and agency mission. An organizational competency model constructed through the use of critical theory offers greater employee and client satisfaction, more effective and efficient service delivery through improved agency self‐actualization and performance, and expanded community involvement through a redefined public interest.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 April 2016

Brandon W. Kliewer, Kristin N. Moretto and Jennifer W. Purcell

The value of the liberal arts and humanities has increasingly been called into question on multiple fronts. Attempts to bridge the practical and liberal arts through forms of…

Abstract

The value of the liberal arts and humanities has increasingly been called into question on multiple fronts. Attempts to bridge the practical and liberal arts through forms of civic professionalism have been gaining traction in larger spheres of influence. This article outlines the results of a deliberative civic engagement forum (n = 42) that created a space for community members from business, education, and non-profit sectors at the National Conference on Service and Volunteerism, to consider the role civic leadership education and development has in liberal arts and humanities programs. The forum was intentionally designed to have participants consider the role of the liberal arts and humanities in redefining the purposes and process of democratic engagement through a lens of civic leadership education and development. This forum was able to gather a group of people from sectors that do not normally speak to the intersection of leadership education and the liberal arts.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Ellen Schall, Sonia Ospina, Bethany Godsoe and Jennifer Dodge

This chapter explores the potential of appreciative inquiry for doing empirical work on leadership. We use a framework that matches a constructionist theoretical lens, an…

Abstract

This chapter explores the potential of appreciative inquiry for doing empirical work on leadership. We use a framework that matches a constructionist theoretical lens, an appreciative and participative stance, a focus on the work of leadership (as opposed to leaders), and multiple methods of inquiry (narrative, ethnographic and cooperative). We elaborate on our experiences with narrative inquiry, while highlighting the value of doing narrative inquiry in an appreciative manner. Finally, we suggest that this particular framework is helping us see how social change leadership work reframes the value that the larger society attributes to members of vulnerable communities.

Details

Constructive Discourse and Human Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-892-7

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

David J. Burns and Debra Mooney

The increasing complexity of higher education has led to the need for a different type of leader that transcends traditional boundaries and individual self-interest. The purpose…

1095

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing complexity of higher education has led to the need for a different type of leader that transcends traditional boundaries and individual self-interest. The purpose of this paper is to propose an alternative form of leadership consistent with the unique challenges faced by institutions of higher education today.

Design/methodology/approach

First, existing research on leadership is explored. Particular attention is placed on identifying the applicability of the primary leadership approaches to the unique organizational environment typically found in institutions of higher education. Transcollegial leadership is then developed as an alternative form of leadership better suited to colleges and universities in today’s dynamic environment.

Findings

After examining the inadequacies of existing forms of leadership in higher education, transcollegial leadership is introduced as the process involved in leaders systematically, but informally, relating to persons and groups of equivalent authority in different areas of an institution of higher education for its betterment and the advancement of its mission, not for person gain.

Practical implications

It appears that transcollegial leadership may be specifically suited for institutions of higher education given their unique organizational structure. Transcollegial leadership permits colleges and universities to better utilize the skills and expertise of their members. The skills and expertise of transcollegial leaders not only benefit their home organizational units, but can benefit the entire organization.

Originality/value

The paper examines a different approach to leadership to aid colleges and universities in facing the challenges of a rapidly changing and increasingly competitive environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Denita Cepiku and Marco Mastrodascio

The purpose of this research is to highlight the impact of integrative leadership behaviors on network performance in local government networks.

2204

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to highlight the impact of integrative leadership behaviors on network performance in local government networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were retrieved from a survey conducted on 362 local government network leaders in Italy. Their leadership behaviors were compared with the level of network performance anonymously self-reported.

Findings

The findings show that high frequency in the usage of a specific category of behavior does not always lead to high performance in local government networks. Moreover, leadership behaviors leading to highly performing networks are not always engaged most frequently by networks' leaders.

Originality/value

This research gives an empirical contribution to a neglected topic: network leadership. Moreover, the authors attempt to highlight how it is able to influence network performance.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

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