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1 – 10 of 117
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

David A. Buchanan and David Boddy

There has been a lot of speculation about the impact of new information technologies on organisations and their members. But there have been comparatively few empirical studies in…

Abstract

There has been a lot of speculation about the impact of new information technologies on organisations and their members. But there have been comparatively few empirical studies in this area. Research carried out in the University of Glasgow Department of Management Studies over the past two years has sought to remedy this position.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16282

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Robert Smith and Gerard McElwee

Food supply chain theory and practice generally assumes that the business practices and processes involved are ethical, legal and value-adding when this is not always so, as…

2392

Abstract

Purpose

Food supply chain theory and practice generally assumes that the business practices and processes involved are ethical, legal and value-adding when this is not always so, as demonstrated by the ongoing 2013 horse-meat scandal. Although it is ostensibly a UK-based affair, it encompasses the meat processing industry across Europe. This study, thus, aims to examine supply chain criminality and to highlight “scandal scripts” which amplify underlying issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of extant literature on the scandal adds to that body of work, updating the existing narrative to include a detailed analysis of convicted “industry insiders”, highlighting supply chain issues involved in the frauds. Micro-stories of businessmen involved are presented to enable an empirical exploration of their illegal involvement in the meat trade. Using storied data from accounts of the scandal as contemporary examples, emerging themes and issues are outlined through a mixed methods qualitative approach consisting of ethical covert research, using documentary research strategy underpinned by narrative inquiry.

Findings

Media coverage perpetuated various myths notably that the fraud was carried out by “shadowy”, Eastern European “mafia figures” exploiting the extended food supply chains. The analysis is aided by the use of media hypothesis. Far from being a mafia-inspired fraud, the criminal activity was organised in nature and committed by insider businessmen. The findings demonstrate that supply chains are complex and require an understanding of storied business practices, including the ethical and illegal.

Research limitations/implications

From an academic perspective, there are implications such as the dearth of academic research and policy-related studies into food fraud possibly because of the difficulty in obtaining data because of access to such enterprises and entrepreneurs necessitating reliance upon documentary sources and investigative journalism.

Practical implications

There are distinct policy implications, particularly the need to legislate against international criminal conspiracies and everyday ordinary organised food frauds perpetuated. Lax penalties do little to prevent such crimes which need to be taken more seriously by the authorities, and treated as major crime. In formulating food laws, rules and regulations, greater cognisance should be taken to consider how supply chains in the food industry could be better protected from predatory criminal actions.

Originality/value

This novel qualitative study will enable academics and practitioners to better understand illegal enterprise, food fraud and risk management from both operational and supply chain perspectives and will be useful to investigators by furthering our understanding of entrepreneurial practice and morality in the food industry.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1992

Robert A. Paton, David Boddy and Sylvia MacDonald

Summarizes the findings of a recently completed research project onCompetence in higher education at Glasgow University Business School andoutlines a subsequently developing…

280

Abstract

Summarizes the findings of a recently completed research project on Competence in higher education at Glasgow University Business School and outlines a subsequently developing competence assessment programme.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

David Boddy

This paper describes a relatively unusual approach to the development of supervisors. The programme took place in a rapidly growing factory manufacturing semi‐conductors, and was…

Abstract

This paper describes a relatively unusual approach to the development of supervisors. The programme took place in a rapidly growing factory manufacturing semi‐conductors, and was designed for 24 supervisors of manual and non‐manual employees. The distinctive feature of this programme is that it was based upon the ideas of action learning. The significance of this is that action learning has tended to be associated with the development of senior managers, taking part in relatively expensive programmes.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Beverly A. Wagner, Douglas K. Macbeth and David Boddy

This paper reflects on a three‐year EPSRC research project (1994‐1997), called "Implementing Partnering in the Supply Chain", that studied the development of collaboration between…

4079

Abstract

This paper reflects on a three‐year EPSRC research project (1994‐1997), called "Implementing Partnering in the Supply Chain", that studied the development of collaboration between two companies, IDV Operations Ireland Limited and Killeen Corrugated and the complex processes involved in fostering their business relationship. The paper illustrates strategic motivation; both corporate and local, of the companies involved. The principal theoretical outcome of the research, “A Partnering Change Model”, provides a structure for analysis. The case describes the outcomes according to this analysis and, finally, conclusions and managerial implications are presented.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

David Boddy

This monograph is written for those who wish to introduce a greater degree of reality into their management development programmes. It has become very clear that conventional…

Abstract

This monograph is written for those who wish to introduce a greater degree of reality into their management development programmes. It has become very clear that conventional off‐the‐job courses are not necessarily the best way to help managers increase their skills or find new and useful ways of thinking about problems. It is equally clear that if nothing systematic is done to expose managers to new ideas and practices, then existing methods and ways of thinking in an organisation will be reinforced, while the world changes.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Douglas K. Macbeth

Applications of AMT and JIT suggest a different relationship should evolve between buyers and suppliers. At a detailed level this will involve supplier selection and monitoring…

Abstract

Applications of AMT and JIT suggest a different relationship should evolve between buyers and suppliers. At a detailed level this will involve supplier selection and monitoring against specified performance measures. For mutually beneficial relationships, however, more managerial choices will have to be made. The nature of these choices and the preferred route to success is the subject of the research programme outlined in the paper. By the study and development of best industrial practice, the intention is to effectively transfer the technology into more buyer/supplier relationships.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Christopher Pich and Dianne Dean

This paper aimed to focus on political marketing and utilised a number of projective techniques to explore the UK Conservative Party’s “brand image” amongst young adults aged…

2686

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to focus on political marketing and utilised a number of projective techniques to explore the UK Conservative Party’s “brand image” amongst young adults aged 18-24 years. There is little guidance in the extant literature regarding projective technique analysis. Furthermore, there are explicit calls for insight and more understanding into the analytical process. Responding to this identified gap in the literature, this paper provides an illustrative guide that can be used to analyse and interpret findings generated from qualitative projective techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted for an exploratory study using focus group discussions, combined with qualitative projective techniques. Eight two-hour focus group discussions were conducted with 46 young citizens aged 18-24 years from three locations in England. Focus groups were conducted prior to the 2010 UK General Election. The data from the projective techniques were thematically analysed by the researcher.

Findings

This research provides insight into the broad process used to analyse and interpret the qualitative projective expressions in relation to the UK Conservative Party’s brand image from the perspective of young adults. Furthermore, this paper highlights that projective techniques can provide an insight into underlying feelings and deep-seated attitudes towards political parties, candidates and the positive and negative aspects of brand image.

Research limitations/implications

Several limitations became apparent at the end of this study. As this is a qualitative study, findings cannot be generalisable to the wider population. Additionally, it is important to note that the researcher had limited experience of conducting focus group discussions combined with projective techniques, and this can be considered a limitation. Nevertheless, the researcher did attend professional “effective depth interviewing” training delivered by the “Marketing Research Society” before data collection. This goes some way in addressing this limitation.

Practical implications

This paper provides an illustrative guide and insight into the analytical process that can be used to analyse and interpret findings generated from qualitative projective techniques. This can be used by academics with little experience of projective techniques. Furthermore, this framework may be useful for practitioners such as marketers, political parties and candidates to explore and analyse the external image of other political brands. The elicitation ability of qualitative projective techniques facilitates greater expressive insight that may remain hidden if traditional direct data collection tools such as interviews and questionnaires are used.

Social implications

This paper provides some understanding into how to analyse subjective meaning such as feelings, attitudes, perceptions and associations revealed through projective techniques. Furthermore, projective techniques can provide access to the private conscious and unconscious inner-world of the participant. They allow respondents to express themselves with greater detail and discussion compared with direct questioning. This research, therefore, presents greater insight in managing and analysing expressions generated from this non-intrusive approach that can encourage open disclosure with less hesitancy, verbally less demanding and suitable to overcome emotional, language and cultural barriers.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the under-researched and undefined practice of analysing projective expressions by providing an illustrative process to interpret and understand insight generated from qualitative projective techniques. Thus, answers the explicit calls for detailed guidance in this area of research. This was achieved by critically reviewing and adapting the approaches taken by Boddy, 2005, Butler-Kisber, 2010 and Hofstede et al., 2007 and incorporating them into a pragmatic systematic framework. This research could be used as a foundation for future studies and a point of reference for people with limited knowledge of projective technique analysis.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Clive Boddy

This paper outlines a variety of the research on student attrition and recognises some of the sensitivities that may be involved for some students in dealing with dropping out of…

1330

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines a variety of the research on student attrition and recognises some of the sensitivities that may be involved for some students in dealing with dropping out of university. This paper claims that because of these sensibilities, some student’s responses to direct questions about the reasons for attrition may be biased by social desirability. The purpose of this paper is to get beyond social desirability bias to examine a fuller range of reasons for student retention and attrition.

Design/methodology/approach

In an exploratory investigation, this research study uses a projective technique which helps to circumvent the conscious defences of respondents. The projective technique is based on the “thematic apperception test” and uses a “bubble drawing” to elicit emotional and more socially undesirable responses.

Findings

All first-year students appear to consider leaving university, and emotional considerations involving loneliness and homesickness are much more prominent than most quantitative studies acknowledge. For example, in this research, social concerns are twice as prominent as financial concerns, whereas in past survey research, financial concerns have been identified as most prominent.

Practical implications

To retain students, universities need to provide new students with real care and support, especially in their first few weeks at university. To study retention comprehensively, researchers need to go beyond the confines of positivist research.

Originality/value

This is the first study that uses a projective technique to investigate student retention and attrition. By going beyond a merely positivist approach to research, a fuller, deeper and more complete understanding of the wide extent and profound nature of the emotional issues involved in student attrition and retention is gained.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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