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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2023

David Atkinson

335

Abstract

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On the Horizon: The International Journal of Learning Futures, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

David W. Atkinson

This paper aims to examine the new teaching universities created in British Columbia and Alberta over the past 10 years in the context of the multiple challenges faced by higher…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the new teaching universities created in British Columbia and Alberta over the past 10 years in the context of the multiple challenges faced by higher education today, including issues of purpose, culture, governance, accountability and finances.

Design/methodology/approach

The essay provides a historic overview of the challenges universities face today. In this context, it presents the new Western Canadian universities as a possible model, even while identifying the challenges these institutions face in the future.

Findings

This case study concludes that universities must change if they are to meet the expectations of students and the needs of society. It outlines the challenges faced by the new universities, how they have responded, the successes they have experienced and the challenges they confront.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study of the new Canadian universities.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

David W. Atkinson

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19” period,”…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19” period,” however, the Humanities deserve attention for the important role they must play in preparing students for the world during a period of dramatic change.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion focuses on the “post-truth” period and how the Humanities have a role in confronting misinformation and “fake news.” It provides specific actions for how those in the Humanities might address the current situation. It relies on the author’s considerable background as a university Dean and President over a period of over 40 years and draws on a variety of written material addressing the future of the Humanities.

Findings

In a period when the world confronts unprecedented change, when misinformation is confused with the truth and when social media exercises so much influence, students more than ever need the insight and context of the Humanities to mitigate the cant, bogus claims and questionable ethics that so much shape the world. Responsibility falls to faculty as they must make clear to their students how the Humanities provide a perspective that allows students to work through the big questions of their time.

Research limitations/implications

Much has been written about the challenges facing the Humanities. It is hoped that this paper will generate additional discussion on how the Humanities might assert themselves during what are troubling times in higher education.

Originality/value

The author’s long experience as a senior university administrator provides a perspective that faculty and administrators might find useful as they consider the future of the Humanities at their institutions.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2011

Ali Al Amaireh

From time immemorial until about a generation ago, the UAE desert-roaming Bedouins were living in tents (hair houses) which they themselves had innovated, constructed and…

Abstract

From time immemorial until about a generation ago, the UAE desert-roaming Bedouins were living in tents (hair houses) which they themselves had innovated, constructed and elaborated. They had done this in such a way as to ensure that their practical need for accommodation was met, that the constraints of their physical environment were taken into account, and that their own social and religious obligations could be discharged. Then almost overnight the tents disappeared and with them the way of life they represented.

As a consequence of the UAE government's policy in the early urbanization and resettlement of the country's nomadic population, the previous occupants of the hair houses found themselves residents of the so-called “housing areas” on the outskirts of the UAE cities and towns. The problems arising from this sudden transformation are the focus of this study which aims to demonstrate that while the resettled Bedouins turned to embrace the modern life in their new homes, they were mentally and emotionally drawn to their past lifestyle in which the hair house, more than merely providing accommodation, was an expression of personality and culture.

To this end, this study documents and analyzes the southern version of the hair house (otherwise known as the “winter house”), previously the most common in the UAE desert. The study will consider not only that the hair house was a masterpiece of innovative construction suited to the Bedouin's environment and culture but also, as comparison at different levels shows, the inadequacy of the urban cement house as the Bedouin's current-day accommodation. Consequently, the study recommends that future housing projects targeted at the resettled Bedouins should be designed with a view to harmonizing the needs and requirements of contemporary life with the rich heritage of the Bedouins.

In carrying out this study, the researcher has utilized a combination of research tools, primarily theoretical, descriptive and analytical together with field visits and personal interviews with former residents of the hair houses and the curators of the Heritage Village in Abu Dhabi, the UAE capital. In contrast, as the “housing areas” are still in existence, the scope of the study is limited to the hair house which it tries to recover and reconstruct as a point of reference for the thesis of the study.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Medea lonesco

With the dramatic expansion of information and of library users' need to access that information, cooperative collection development has become an increasingly attractive option…

Abstract

With the dramatic expansion of information and of library users' need to access that information, cooperative collection development has become an increasingly attractive option. Debate in this area has recently been enriched by the simultaneous publication of articles by Ross Atkinson and David H. Stam. Against a vast background of literature already accumulated, we now have what might be considered a state‐of‐the‐art basis for further discussions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Parissa Safai

This chapter explores the emergence, growth, and current status of the sociology of sport in Canada. Such an endeavour includes acknowledging the work and efforts of Canadian…

Abstract

This chapter explores the emergence, growth, and current status of the sociology of sport in Canada. Such an endeavour includes acknowledging the work and efforts of Canadian scholars – whether Canadian by birth or naturalization or just as a result of their geographic location – who have contributed to the vibrant and robust academic discipline that is the sociology of sport in Canadian institutions coast-to-coast, and who have advanced the socio-cultural study of sport globally in substantial ways. This chapter does not provide an exhaustive description and analysis of the past and present states of the sociology of sport in Canada; in fact, it is important to note that an in-depth, critical and comprehensive analysis of our field in Canada is sorely lacking. Rather, this chapter aims to highlight the major historical drivers (both in terms of people and trends) of the field in Canada; provide a snapshot of the sociology of sport in Canada currently; and put forth some ideas as to future opportunities and challenges for the field in Canada.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

David Atkinson

This paper seeks to explore the concept of dance as a metaphor for relating to the challenges of management and human relations within the organisational space. It asks in what…

1202

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the concept of dance as a metaphor for relating to the challenges of management and human relations within the organisational space. It asks in what way can the art‐related concept of dance be applied to the benefit of a dominant science‐led management learning and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores its topic through counter‐factual argument, drawing on a recently published theory of art‐related management practice. It invokes dance as an application of the theory to further explore that theory's relevance to management and organisational thinking.

Findings

The concept of an organisational dance is explored by considering the notions of presence and rhythm. A definition for social presence is derived in order to present an ability of the individual to perceive a socially constructed reality, against which collective movement – aligned within a concept of organisational rhythm – permits a form of dance to emerge. The organisational dance sets up a form of social constructionism in which new forms of knowledge might arise through creative play.

Originality/value

The paper argues that the metaphor of dance can usefully provide new insight into thinking about management, by providing an intellectual basis for writing about organisational dance. The paper concludes that the research question is not (empirically) “what dances are being practiced” but, in order to better support managers in practice, “how do we make the organisation dance?”

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2011

Mark Muro and Bruce Katz

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to advance understanding of regional industry or innovation clusters and the opportunities that the cluster framework provides…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to advance understanding of regional industry or innovation clusters and the opportunities that the cluster framework provides policymakers for delivering economic impact, clarifying economic priorities, and coordinating disparate programmatic efforts, and to articulate some basic principles for formulating cluster strategies.

Methodology/approach – As the cluster concept enters its third decade and the body of related literature reaches a new level of maturity a consensus has emerged among academics and policy thinkers on the economic benefits of clusters. In fact, clusters have emerged as major focus of economic and policy discussion just now – in what the authors dub a “cluster moment” – by dint of their demonstrated practical impact, their value in paradigm discussions, and their potential utility in policy reform. The chapter reviews the benefits of clusters and traces their ascendance – and re-emergence post-recession – among policy thinkers.

Findings – New research confirms that strong clusters tend to deliver positive benefits to workers, firms, and regions. As a paradigm, they reflect the nature of the real economy and as a matter of policymaking, clusters provide a framework for rethinking and refocusing economic policy. In pursuing cluster-based economic development strategies, policy leaders should not try to create clusters; use data to target interventions, drive design, and track performance; focus initiatives on addressing discrete gaps in performance or binding constraints on cluster growth; maximize impact by leveraging pre-existing cluster-relevant programs; align efforts vertically as well as horizontally; and let the private sector lead. All three tiers of the nation's federalist system have distinct and complementary roles to play in advancing the cluster paradigm.

Research limitations/implications (if applicable) – The paper includes no new/original data.

Practical implications (if applicable) – Given that clusters have emerged as a major focus of economics and policy, this chapter lays out a core set of general principles for pursuing cluster-based economic development strategies – and for avoiding common pitfalls – to which policymakers can adhere.

Originality/value of paper – The chapter advances cluster thinking and cluster strategies as a paradigm with the potential to accelerate regional economic growth and assist with the nation's needed restructuring and rebalancing toward a more productive post-recession economy.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Global Competitiveness in Regional Economies: Determinants and Policy Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-395-8

Content available
724

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

W. Chad Carlos, Wesley D. Sine, Brandon H. Lee and Heather A. Haveman

Social movements can disrupt existing industries and inspire the emergence of new markets by drawing attention to problems with the status quo and promoting alternatives. We…

Abstract

Social movements can disrupt existing industries and inspire the emergence of new markets by drawing attention to problems with the status quo and promoting alternatives. We examine how the influence of social movements on entrepreneurial activity evolves as the markets they foster mature. Theoretically, we argue that the success of social movements in furthering market expansion leads to three related outcomes. First, the movement-encouraged development of market infrastructure reduces the need for continued social movement support. Second, social movements’ efforts on behalf of new markets increase the importance of resource availability for market entry. Third, market growth motivates countermovement that reduce the beneficial impact of initiator movements on entrepreneurial activity. We test these arguments by analyzing evolving social movement dynamics and entrepreneurial activity in the US wind power industry from 1992 to 2007. We discuss the implications of our findings for the study of social movements, stakeholder management, sustainability, and entrepreneurship.

Details

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2

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