Gone with the Wind: The Evolving Influence of Social Movements and Counter Movements on Entrepreneurial Activity in the US Wind Industry

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility

ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2, eISBN: 978-1-78756-315-5

ISSN: 0742-3322

Publication date: 10 August 2018

Abstract

Social movements can disrupt existing industries and inspire the emergence of new markets by drawing attention to problems with the status quo and promoting alternatives. We examine how the influence of social movements on entrepreneurial activity evolves as the markets they foster mature. Theoretically, we argue that the success of social movements in furthering market expansion leads to three related outcomes. First, the movement-encouraged development of market infrastructure reduces the need for continued social movement support. Second, social movements’ efforts on behalf of new markets increase the importance of resource availability for market entry. Third, market growth motivates countermovement that reduce the beneficial impact of initiator movements on entrepreneurial activity. We test these arguments by analyzing evolving social movement dynamics and entrepreneurial activity in the US wind power industry from 1992 to 2007. We discuss the implications of our findings for the study of social movements, stakeholder management, sustainability, and entrepreneurship.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgments

We thank Arkangel Cordero, Robert David, Glen Dowell, Shon Hiatt, Olga Khessina, Ben Lewis, Sarah Soule, Pam Tolbert, Yin Ximing, and Jeff York for their helpful comments on previous drafts. We also gratefully acknowledge funding from the David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.

Citation

Carlos, W.C., Sine, W.D., Lee, B.H. and Haveman, H.A. (2018), "Gone with the Wind: The Evolving Influence of Social Movements and Counter Movements on Entrepreneurial Activity in the US Wind Industry", Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility (Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 38), Emerald Publishing Limited, pp. 339-364. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0742-332220180000038018

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