Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Samuel Fiifi Hammond, Thayaparan Gajendran, David A. Savage and Kim Maund

Given the importance of green construction for reducing the negative environmental impact of the construction industry, and the numerous policies instituted by governments around…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of green construction for reducing the negative environmental impact of the construction industry, and the numerous policies instituted by governments around the world to motivate building construction stakeholders, why is there still a limited level of adoption?

Design/methodology/approach

Building on studies that have questioned the dominant framing of the limited adoption of green construction as an inefficient behaviour, this study proposes a theoretical model characterising the two problems in the decision-making process that boost the reluctance of building construction stakeholders to embrace green construction. A traditional literature review, combining deductive and inductive approaches was employed.

Findings

The theoretical model consists of six conceptual variables as follows: social norms, personal dilemma, trust, loss aversion, self-interest and green construction adoption. The expected relationships between them are also provided.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical model has not been empirically tested; however, it can be replicated or adapted for empirical investigation in any context.

Practical implications

This study may help in identifying which factors must be given attention in policy-making in order to promote the adoption of green technologies and practices. Specifically, subjecting the theoretical model to empirical test will reveal the strongest paths that can be used to curtail the reluctance of the industry to embrace green construction.

Originality/value

Contributes towards the current research agenda on the reasons for the low level of voluntary adoption of green construction. It also provides theoretical answers to the questions regarding the limited impact of the plentiful policy mechanisms instituted by governments around the world to promote green construction adoption.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Derek Friday, David A. Savage, Steven A. Melnyk, Norma Harrison, Suzanne Ryan and Heidi Wechtler

Inventory management systems in health-care supply chains (HCSC) have been pushed to breaking point by the COVID-19 pandemic. Unanticipated demand shocks due to stockpiling of…

6822

Abstract

Purpose

Inventory management systems in health-care supply chains (HCSC) have been pushed to breaking point by the COVID-19 pandemic. Unanticipated demand shocks due to stockpiling of medical supplies caused stockouts, and the stockouts triggered systematic supply chain (SC) disruptions inconceivable for risk managers working individually with limited information about the pandemic. The purpose of this paper is to respond to calls from the United Nations (UN) and World Health Organization (WHO) for coordinated global action by proposing a research agenda based on a review of current knowledge and knowledge gaps on the role of collaboration in HCSCs in maintaining optimal stock levels and reinforcing resilience against stockout disruptions during pandemics.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted, and a total of 752 articles were analyzed.

Findings

Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment practices are under-researched in the HCSC literature. Similarly, a fragmented application of extant SC collaborative risk management capabilities undermines efforts to enhance resilience against systematic disruptions from medical stockouts. The paucity of HCSC articles in humanitarian logistics and SC journals indicates a need for more research interlinking two interdependent yet critical fields in responding to pandemics.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on an exhaustive search of academic articles addressing HCSCs, there is a possibility of having overlooked other studies due to search variations in language controls, differences in publication cycle time and database search engines.

Originality/value

The paper relies on COVID-19's uniqueness to highlight the limitations in optimization and individualistic approaches to managing medical inventory and stockout risks in HCSCs. The paper proposes a shift from a fragmented to holistic application of relevant collaboration practices and capabilities to enhance the resilience of HCSCs against stockout ripple effects during future pandemics. The study propositions and suggestion for an SC learning curve provide an interdisciplinary research agenda to trigger early preparation of a coordinated HCSC and humanitarian logistics response to future pandemics.

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Martin Gächter, David A. Savage and Benno Torgler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department.

2584

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a survey of Baltimore officers, designed to examine the relationship between police stress and domestic violence in police families were used. Using multivariate regression analysis, the authors focus on the officers' stated intentions to look for alternative employment, with proxies for social and workplace factors.

Findings

Higher levels of cooperation (trust), interactional justice and work‐life‐balance reduce police officers' intentions to quit. While high levels of physical and psychological strain and trauma are not correlated with intentions to quit.

Research limitations/implications

A discernible limitation of this study is the age of the data analyzed and that many changes have occurred in recent times (policing and social). It would be of great interest to repeat this study to gauge the true effect.

Practical implications

There are policy implications for retention and recruitment: it may possible to decrease the ethnic and gender gaps, through identifying officers at risk and creating programs to hold existing minorities, recruit more, whilst maintaining a strong, happy and healthy department.

Originality/value

This study examines the impact of workplace factors on quitting intention for police officers. It is demonstrated that social capital, fairness and work‐life balance are moderators for quitting, adding to the literature on worker retention, as little research has been done using multivariate analysis on quitting intentions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Martin Gächter, Davd A. Savage and Benno Torgler

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of social capital with the negative externalities associated with stress, or the psychological and physiological strains…

2707

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of social capital with the negative externalities associated with stress, or the psychological and physiological strains experienced by police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected in 1999 from a survey of Baltimore Police officers designed to examine questions about the relationship between police stress and domestic violence in police families and using multivariate regression analysis, the paper focuses on five different proxies for stress and strain, and two proxies for social capital and conducting several robustness checks.

Findings

Results show that an increase in social capital is significantly correlated to a decrease in the level of strain, in the psychological, physical, burnout and health areas.

Research limitations/implications

While this study examines the social capital/strain relationship with US officers, more research is needed, as these findings may not extrapolate well into other national settings. It may also be interesting to further explore sub‐cultures within departments. Additionally, the data may be dated and, as major changes and events have occurred since the survey, a newer study of officers would be needed to observe whether these changes have had significant impact.

Practical implications

From a policy perspective, the findings suggest that stress reduction programs should actively engage employees to build stronger social networks.

Originality/value

This study comprehensively examines the ability of social capital at negating the impacts of strains, and significantly reduces the impact of major trauma events. This paper adds to the literature as there are few multivariate analyses of the social capital/strain relationship.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1980

James G Ollé, James Tank, George Jefferson, David Liddle, David Reid and Colin Steele

IF YOU should ever have a mind to experience the flavour of life in the British public library service during the early decades of this century, you could not do better than turn…

Abstract

IF YOU should ever have a mind to experience the flavour of life in the British public library service during the early decades of this century, you could not do better than turn to the contemporary files of the periodicals of librarianship. Apart from its beastlier aspects, to which only a George Orwell could have done justice, the library journals reflected pretty well the public library world as it used to be: impoverished and imperfect, but optimistic and resilient.

Details

New Library World, vol. 81 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

David Prochaska

This chapter is an exercise in speaking, letting individuals speak for themselves insofar as possible. As Marx famously put it, “they cannot represent themselves, they must be…

Abstract

This chapter is an exercise in speaking, letting individuals speak for themselves insofar as possible. As Marx famously put it, “they cannot represent themselves, they must be represented.” The “they” were peasants, potato farmers in 1840s France, and by extension peasants, workers, and other lower class groups, not to mention women and minorities who rarely made it into the historical record, and even more rarely in their own words. To give “voice to the voiceless,” as the now old new social historians of the 1960s and 1970s put it, I consciously include here numerous speakers, arranged in two sets of different voices: quotes in the text and endnotes to further document and amplify points. With this plethora of voices, the aim is not to complicate but to speak clearly, listen carefully, and engage respectfully. To multiply the speakers speaking is the single best way to make two primary points concerning what is most important about the Chief Illiniwek mascot controversy: that the sheer number of individuals speaking out is in itself significant, and that this community colloquy all comes down to identity – who we are, individual identity, communal identity.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Scott V. Savage, David Melamed and Aaron Vincent

This study examines how the distribution of opinions and social status combine in a collectively oriented task group to affect perceptions about the correctness of a final…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how the distribution of opinions and social status combine in a collectively oriented task group to affect perceptions about the correctness of a final decision.

Design/methodology/approach

We relied on data from a controlled laboratory experiment to test a series of theoretically derived hypotheses.

Findings

The study shows that both the distribution of opinions and status affect perceptions of correctness. It also establishes that the effects of status on uncertainty are strongest when the group is initially evenly split about the correctness of an opinion, and that like the distribution of opinions, the effects of status on uncertainty are curvilinear.

Research limitations/implications

Previous research shows that by integrating research on faction sizes with status characteristics theory (SCT), more accurate predictions of social influence are possible. Assumed therein is that people use information about the distribution of opinions and status to reduce uncertainty about correctness of a choice. The current study establishes this point empirically by examining the effects of the distribution of opinions and status in a four-person, collectively oriented task group. Future research should consider groups of different sizes and other moderating factors.

Originality/value

This study advances and elaborates upon previous research on social influence that integrates research on faction sizes with SCT.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Wilfred Ashworth, Graham Barnett, Julian Hodgson, WA Munford, Jennifer Brice and David Radmore

ADVERSE WEATHER conditions greatly reduced the number of members attending the February Council especially those resident in parts east. Everyone who had made it seemed to take a

Abstract

ADVERSE WEATHER conditions greatly reduced the number of members attending the February Council especially those resident in parts east. Everyone who had made it seemed to take a while to warm to their task and passed the report of the Executive Co‐ordinating Committee like lambs. With mild interest they heard that the Secretary had recommended to the General Purposes Committee that the old Council Chamber should not after all, be divided into offices but instead be made into a joint members' and staff common room. ‘More modest extensions to the toilet accommodation’ (the imagination boggles!) are part of this reduced package which saves half the projected £40,000. For council meetings a platform with furniture suitable to the dignity of the association will be provided.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

All the indications are that the recession, having savaged industry mercilessly over the last couple of years, has turned its baleful attention on the consumer. Since March 1981…

Abstract

All the indications are that the recession, having savaged industry mercilessly over the last couple of years, has turned its baleful attention on the consumer. Since March 1981 real incomes have been falling, and the forecast (by Capel‐Cure Myers) is that this erosion of real incomes will continue this year. Unemployment — the most tragic affliction of society — is, as is well known, around the 3 million mark; the significant point here is that regional variations are not only substantial but that they create a marked discrepancy between employment levels in the north and north‐west as opposed to the south and south‐east. The national unemployment average stands at 11.7% — but it is 14.8% in the north and only 8.7% in the south east. Even an area such as the Midlands, traditionally prosperous, is now having to receive assistance. This gap will continue to widen. The DoE forecasts that only 1% of new jobs will be created in the north‐west to 1986, 2% in the north and 3% in Wales — as against 34% in the south‐east. There is also clear evidence that investment increasingly favours the south and south east at the expense of the north and west; rental growth south of the Humber/Severn line is now several points higher than in the north. How is the retail sector responding to this economic polarisation? At a conference on Merchandising organised by the Retail Management Development Programme in March, it was evident that it is going to be a factor at the forefront of retail management awareness when planning capital investment programmes. As David Malpas of Tesco commented: “it is as interesting to speculate about Asda's enthusiasm for obtaining planning consents in the south, as it is to note that much of Sainsbury's strength has turned on concentrating their business in the south and east.” And the type of premises developed may well begin to show marked differences in line with this economic polarisation. Three years ago Tesco forecast that retailers in the more depressed areas would trade increasingly out of stripped‐down, limited range discount stores. The effects of the polarisation will inevitably spread to the types of merchandise; Tesco have already announced they are extending their test market for generics further south, to Yorkshire and the north‐east following their initial test in Scotland. But while the larger supermarket groups continue to major on fresh foods, there seems — inexplicably — no market yet for downmarket fresh food. Yet, with women being thrown out of work at a faster rate than men, and with real incomes declining, it would seem logical that more time and less money should prompt more careful shopping and cooking. When the question was put to David Malpas at the conference, he confessed himself baffled. “It's a paradox,” he said, “I see women piling up their trolleys with expensive convenience foods when they should buy better ingredients at cheaper cost.” With economic reality becoming harsher, will the price of such capriciousness soon affect spending patterns? Looking at the country as a whole, what will people be spending their money on in the immediate future? John Richards of Capel‐Cure forecast a rosy future for home entertainment, especially video, audio and photography; and for sports equipment and clothing. And DIY still looks good. But he was doubtful about clothing, women's cosmetics and jewellery. And the beer market looks cloudy. In this report on the merchandising conference we concentrate our attention on two papers only — the economic background provided by Tony MacNeary and John Richards of Capel‐Cure Myers, and the implications of this for the retailer by Tesco's David Malpas. These papers, we feel, are deeply significant for everybody in the retail and distribution sector.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

1 – 10 of over 1000