Search results

1 – 10 of 245
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Christina Soh, Quee Yong Mah, Fong Jek Gan, Daniel Chew and Edna Reid

Focuses on business firms in Singapore, identifying the industries in which the Internet is being used for business. These firms are early adopters in the local environment where…

4386

Abstract

Focuses on business firms in Singapore, identifying the industries in which the Internet is being used for business. These firms are early adopters in the local environment where use of the Internet for business is a new phenomenon still, and they provide information about their Internet experience in terms of their use, perceptions, and the problems encountered. Finds that companies in seven major industries lead in the business use of the Internet in Singapore: computer and information technology; hospitality; manufacturing; travel; retail; publications; and banking and finance. Most of the survey respondents use the Internet for marketing and advertising, customer service and support, information gathering, and, to a lesser degree, electronic transactions. The respondents’ perception of the attributes of the Internet are largely positive. The problems encountered by the respondents include difficulty in locating information, rising costs of Internet use, and security.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Joseph Marmol Yap and Agnes Sambalilo Barsaga

Oral histories (OHs), as primary sources of information, are used as evidences of the past and inculcate human memory. It is a real testimony of our history. However, OHs are now…

1389

Abstract

Purpose

Oral histories (OHs), as primary sources of information, are used as evidences of the past and inculcate human memory. It is a real testimony of our history. However, OHs are now neglected and somehow unpopular. Strategies must be done to make sure that OH projects should continue to be used as proofs. The purpose of this paper is to go back in time and review the OH in Asia, in the Philippines, and the collection at De La Salle University.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the OH collection of the DLSU Archives. Data are extracted from the Sierra library system. Extracted subjects are arranged alphabetically. They are presented and summarized below. Historical data coming from the correspondences kept at the archives are also used to understand how the collection accumulated and how they are being organized, classified, and used by the patrons. Literature reviews are also consulted to learn more about the background of OH in the Philippines.

Findings

A total of 176 subjects are identified. These subjects are selected on the basis of the Library of Congress Classification Scheme which is re-categorized according to the Philippine Standard Industrial Classification to identify which type of industry does each OH belong to. The category on professional, scientific and technical activities had 30 LCC-related subjects or 16.95 percent of the total number of subjects, next is 15.25 percent or 27 LCC-related subjects which comes from the arts, entertainment and recreation, and top three is Public Administration and Defense; Compulsory Security with 10.23 percent.

Research limitations/implications

This paper shares the challenges and experiences of establishing and maintaining OHs.

Practical implications

The paper presents new ways or initiatives to capture OH other than the traditional and usual process.

Social implications

Oral interviews are given proper attention as part of the local history.

Originality/value

There is a scarcity of OH papers written by librarians; therefore, this paper presents the current status of OH in the country.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Kingsley Obi Omeihe, Amon Simba, David Rae, Veronika Gustafsson and Mohammad Saud Khan

The purpose of this article is to develop new insights into the interplay between trust, indigenous institutions and weak/dysfunctional formal institutions using the Nigerian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to develop new insights into the interplay between trust, indigenous institutions and weak/dysfunctional formal institutions using the Nigerian context – a developing country in Western Africa. It advances new understanding on how Nigerian entrepreneurs trust in their indigenous institutions such as family ties, kinship, chieftaincy, religion, cooperatives and trade associations to resolve disputes arising from their exporting activities as opposed to dormant formal institutions in their country.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study adopts an interpretive research paradigm, and it utilises a case study strategy. Data collected through observations, archival records and qualitative conversations with 36 exporting Nigerian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is analysed by utilising a combination of within and cross-case analysis techniques. Doing so enabled an in-depth study of the methods their owner-managers use in order to take advantage of the relationships they established through their long-standing cultural institutions in the place of weak formal institutions in their country.

Findings

Indigenous institutions have evolved to replace formalised institutions within the business environment in Nigeria. They have developed to become an alternative and trusted arbiter for solving SMEs' export issues because of weak/dysfunctional formal institutions in the Western African country. The owner-managers of exporting SMEs perceive formal institutions as representing a fragmented system that does not benefit their export businesses.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that there is need for policymakers to consider the role of informal institutions in the Nigerian context. Such an approach is essential given the economic importance and increasing number of SMEs that trade and export their goods through informal structures in Nigeria.

Originality/value

The study indicates that it is not just the void or absence of institutions that exist in a developing country such as Nigeria, but weak/dysfunctional formal institutions have been replaced by culturally embedded informal institutions. Thus, the study provides a new theoretical avenue depicting the concept of trusting in indigenous institutions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Soo Hong Chew, King King Li, Robin Chark and Songfa Zhong

Purpose – This experimental economics study using brain imaging techniques investigates the risk-ambiguity distinction in relation to the source preference hypothesis (Fox &…

Abstract

Purpose – This experimental economics study using brain imaging techniques investigates the risk-ambiguity distinction in relation to the source preference hypothesis (Fox & Tversky, 1995) in which identically distributed risks arising from different sources of uncertainty may engender distinct preferences for the same decision maker, contrary to classical economic thinking. The use of brain imaging enables sharper testing of the implications of different models of decision-making including Chew and Sagi's (2008) axiomatization of source preference.

Methodology/approach – Using fMRI, brain activations were observed when subjects make 48 sequential binary choices among even-chance lotteries based on whether the trailing digits of a number of stock prices at market closing would be odd or even. Subsequently, subjects rate familiarity of the stock symbols.

Findings – When contrasting brain activation from more familiar sources with those from less familiar ones, regions appearing to be more active include the putamen, medial frontal cortex, and superior temporal gyrus. ROI analysis showed that the activation patterns in the familiar–unfamiliar and unfamiliar–familiar contrasts are similar to those in the risk–ambiguity and ambiguity–risk contrasts reported by Hsu et al. (2005). This supports the conjecture that the risk-ambiguity distinction can be subsumed by the source preference hypothesis.

Research limitations/implications – Our odd–even design has the advantage of inducing the same “unambiguous” probability of half for each subject in each binary comparison. Our finding supports the implications of the Chew–Sagi model and rejects models based on global probabilistic sophistication, including rank-dependent models derived from non-additive probabilities, e.g., Choquet expected utility and cumulative prospect theory, as well as those based on multiple priors, e.g., α-maxmin. The finding in Hsu et al. (2005) that orbitofrontal cortex lesion patients display neither ambiguity aversion nor risk aversion offers further support to the Chew–Sagi model. Our finding also supports the Levy et al. (2007) contention of a single valuation system encompassing risk and ambiguity aversion.

Originality/value of chapter – This is the first neuroimaging study of the source preference hypothesis using a design which can discriminate among decision models ranging from risk-based ones to those relying on multiple priors.

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Thomas O’Daniel and Chew Kok Wai

At the Multimedia University, Malaysia, a first‐year undergraduate course in electronic commerce was given the task of evaluating commercial Web sites. The existence of the host…

Abstract

At the Multimedia University, Malaysia, a first‐year undergraduate course in electronic commerce was given the task of evaluating commercial Web sites. The existence of the host was verified when it was added to the sample, and again six months later. The sample was then analysed for correlation between domain names and regional allocation of IP addresses. Three characteristics of the sample stand out. First, in many cases the top‐level domain name does not correspond to the location of the host; there is a noticeable bias toward hosting sites with regional domain names in North America. Second, dot COM and certain regional domains seem to dominate the Internet commercial landscape. Finally, there is a measurable rate of attrition over time, which may or may not be truly significant.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Goreti Botelho, Emília Rodrigues, Rita Matos and Jorge Lameiras

There is a relationship between eating behaviours and the development of speech-language competences during childhood. This study aims to evaluate the impact of interdisciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a relationship between eating behaviours and the development of speech-language competences during childhood. This study aims to evaluate the impact of interdisciplinary sessions on food and speech-language education with children’s parents.

Design/methodology/approach

The session was focused on healthy eating habits and behaviours that may improve or impair child speech competence. Using a self-administered questionnaire, before and immediately after the session, parents from 11 preschools, answered 12 questions, on a five-point Likert scale. Questionnaires from the final sample (n = 96) were statistically analysed using the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test.

Findings

Statistical analysis revealed statistically significant differences in answers to six questions between pre and post intervention: items 1 (Z = −5.04; p < 0.001), 2 (Z = −3.68; p < 0.001), 3 (Z = −4.12; p < 0.001), 4 (Z = −5.87; p < 0.001), 9 (Z = −2.73; p = 0.006) and 12 (Z = −2.00; p = 0.046). The questionnaire responses after the session showed that parents became more aware of the relationship between the two areas addressed. In addition, the subjects presented more assertiveness in their answers after the educational intervention of the nutritionist and the speech therapist.

Practical implications

The study showed the importance of associating topics on food and speech-language education and both being addressed simultaneously to parents. The empowerment of parents and other caregivers about feeding and speech-language development may increase their motivation to foster child healthy eating behaviours. It is also desirable to extend this kind of interdisciplinary intervention to other preschools.

Originality/value

This study fulfils an identified need to study the perceived knowledge of parents about the food-related behaviours influencing speech-language competences of children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Daniel C.W. Ho, S.M. Lo and C.Y. Yiu

This paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature concerning the various causes of failures of external wall tile finishes.

1944

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature concerning the various causes of failures of external wall tile finishes.

Design/methodology/approach

A 4×3 matrix hierarchy framework is developed for a systematic analysis of the literature reviewed.

Findings

The findings from this paper indicate the importance of environmental effects, movement joints, and adhesive on the performance of external wall tile finishes. Thermal and moisture effects induce movement of tiles, and the failure of the tiling system depends very much on the adhesive strength and the provision of movement joints. Workmanship is also a key factor affecting the performance of external wall tile finishes and should not be overlooked.

Research limitations/implications

Various studies have been carried out on the causes of defects in external finishes in the past. However, many of them were case‐oriented and were not supported by laboratory findings. The hierarchical framework developed in this paper serves as a basis for further laboratory and field studies on this issue.

Practical implications

The framework is conducive to the diagnosis of external wall tile delamination.

Originality/value

This paper reviews systematically and comprehensively the literature on the causes of external wall tile delamination.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Daniel Briggs and Tim Turner

The behavior of British youth abroad has caused considerable concern over recent years. This is because many British youth engage in binge drinking, drug use, sex behavior and…

2616

Abstract

Purpose

The behavior of British youth abroad has caused considerable concern over recent years. This is because many British youth engage in binge drinking, drug use, sex behavior and other risk behaviors – especially in the Balearics, Spain. While research has documented levels of alcohol use, drug use, risk and sex behaviors on these islands, it tends to rely on survey data. This article aims to offer some contextualization to the British youth holiday experience and to examine why such behaviors might take place.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses ethnographic methods (observation, open‐ended focus groups) with British youth in San Antonio, Ibiza. Over the course of one week in July 2010, 17 focus groups were undertaken (n=97 aged between 17 and 31). Observations were conducted in bars, clubs, beaches, and general tourist areas.

Findings

The data suggest that young people engage in these behaviors not only to escape the constraints of work and family but also because they are exciting. The data also indicate that these behaviors appeared to help British youth construct life biographies which were integral to their identity construction. The findings are also considered within the social context of Ibiza which also played a role in promoting these behaviors.

Originality/value

No ethnographic research exists on the topic of British youth and their behaviors abroad. Previous research is mostly epidemiological survey research which does not adequately consider the social meaning and context for the behavior of British youth abroad.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Donald D. Hackney, Daniel Friesner and Erica H. Johnson

Medical bankruptcies occur when an individual experiences an acute or chronic health event, and the costs of care exceed the individual’s ability to pay. In such cases, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical bankruptcies occur when an individual experiences an acute or chronic health event, and the costs of care exceed the individual’s ability to pay. In such cases, the individual typically files for bankruptcy. There is an extensive literature that estimates the prevalence of medical bankruptcy, but studies either select a population whose medical care is extremely expensive or chooses ad hoc thresholds for medical bankruptcy categorizations. In both cases, the prevalence of medical bankruptcy is biased. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the actual prevalence of medical bankruptcies in a manner that avoids these limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are randomly drawn from a single US Bankruptcy Court district. Following the literature, an ad hoc threshold of medical debts which places the bankruptcy filer “at risk” for a medical bankruptcy is postulated. Misclassification analyses are used to estimate the likelihood of a medical bankruptcy filing while adjusting for the use of ad hoc thresholds.

Findings

The naive prevalence of medical bankruptcy is 23.1 percent, but exceeds 50 percent when accounting for misclassification. Many individuals are “ostensibly” medically bankrupt. They are already seriously indebted, and any outside financial shock, including but not limited to medical bills, can push these debtors into insolvency.

Originality/value

Bankruptcy is an important social safety net. An improved understanding of the types and magnitudes of medical debts which precipitate a bankruptcy filing can lead to policies that improve outcomes for bankruptcy filers and reduce the social costs of bankruptcy.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

1 – 10 of 245