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Article

Rejikumar G., Raja Sreedharan V. and Raiswa Saha

Consumer behavior, in the context of general insurance, is worth exploring to formulate growth strategies for insurance sector in India in light of the proposed structural…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer behavior, in the context of general insurance, is worth exploring to formulate growth strategies for insurance sector in India in light of the proposed structural changes. Indian consumers attract global players due to untapped potential and favorable policy measures initiated for higher foreign direct investments. The purpose of this paper is to understand the prevailing level of service quality as perceived by insurance customers in India in the presence of certain contextual antecedents and moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

Perceptions about constructs like customer risk dispositions, awareness, past experiences, customer involvement, choice overload, service quality and satisfaction of 256 customers were collected using a questionnaire survey. A variance-based structural equation modeling helped to identify significant linkages among the constructs.

Findings

In order to assess service quality levels, a 15-item scale having the infrastructure, employees, agents and product dimensions was found valid and reliable. Choice overload and customer involvement were found to moderate the influence of antecedents and service quality, respectively. The influence of choice overload on quality perceptions is insignificant. The study concludes that the existing risk beliefs are insufficient, and experiences have less predictive contribution to quality perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, this study examined the process of satisfaction development from service quality perceptions. This study offers insights for developing theories to portray future consumer behavior where more dependence of self-service technologies is expected to dominate service delivery mechanisms in insurance. The study informs that general insurance customers in India prefer more diversified products, more customer-centric employees/agents and better technical quality.

Practical implications

The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the prevailing insurance consumer behavior in the general insurance sector of India and help insurance service providers in streamlining their strategies for better insurance penetration and reduced lapse rate.

Originality/value

This study helps in understanding the emerging trends in general insurance buying behavior in India.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Understanding the Investor: A Maltese Study of Risk and Behavior in Financial Investment Decisions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-705-9

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Article

Chatura Ranaweera, Harvir Bansal and Gordon McDougall

A main focus in recent online consumer research has been on context specific trust, risk, and online buying experience. Despite the importance, their individual level…

Abstract

Purpose

A main focus in recent online consumer research has been on context specific trust, risk, and online buying experience. Despite the importance, their individual level “equivalents” – trust disposition, risk aversion, and technology readiness – have received limited attention. This research attempts to fill that gap by focussing on these crucial personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a survey‐based method to test a theoretically grounded set of hypotheses. The measurement model is tested using SEM and the hypotheses are tested using regression techniques.

Findings

The personality characteristics are found to have significant moderating effects on online purchase intentions. Interestingly, provided the consumers are satisfied, risk aversion is found to increase the likelihood of purchase. Moreover, while technology readiness increases the likelihood of online purchase, dispositional trust is found not to have a similar effect.

Research limitations/implications

Significant full and quasi moderator effects of three hitherto untested personality traits on online purchase behaviour are found. Results show that risk aversion, trust disposition, and technology readiness are fundamental to online consumer behaviour literature.

Practical implications

The results suggest that to be successful, relatively unknown web‐based service providers need to go beyond matching their large competitor and need to offer unique web sites to browsers. Results also indicate that personality traits pose both significant challenges as well as unexpected opportunities to online service providers in identifying inherently more loyal customers.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a set of hither to untested personality traits that have fundamental relevance to online consumer behaviour. It also offers practical recommendations to relatively unknown online service providers on how to compete with their better known competitors. Results are generalisable to online service providers in a number of industries.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article

Stephan Zielke and Thomas Dobbelstein

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing customers' willingness to purchase new store brands.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing customers' willingness to purchase new store brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a 3×3 design to investigate the impact of price and quality positioning on the willingness to purchase new store brands in five product groups. A total of 990 respondents completed a questionnaire about store brand perception, aspects of purchasing behavior and willingness to buy. Data are analyzed with analysis of variance and partial least squares.

Findings

The paper finds that customers' willingness to buy new store brands differs between different product groups. It is lowest for product groups associated with high social risk. Accordingly, premium store brands are preferred for these categories. The influence of price is small and nonlinear. Furthermore, the attitude towards a specific store brand has a large impact on customers' willingness to purchase, while the attitude toward store brands in general is less important. The drivers influencing customers' attitude towards specific store brands depend on the respective product group.

Practical implications

The results indicate that price is not the only factor influencing customers' willingness to buy new store brands. Therefore, the results encourage retailers to position store brands also in premium segments, especially for product groups where social acceptance is important.

Originality/value

This paper differs from other papers in the literature in that it analyses factors influencing the success of new store brands. Furthermore, it analyzes many different potential influencing factors, namely product group, price and quality positioning, store brand perceptions, attitudes and aspects of purchasing behavior.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Zhen Shao, Yue Guo, Xiaotong Li and Stuart Barnes

Despite the growing popularity of ride-sharing in China, our understanding regarding users' trust and behavioral intention toward this new type of hailing service is still…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing popularity of ride-sharing in China, our understanding regarding users' trust and behavioral intention toward this new type of hailing service is still limited. This study aims to examine the joint influences of institution-based, process-based and characteristic-based antecedents on customers' trust and continuance intention toward ride-sharing. Furthermore, the study aims to investigate if the relative influences of institution-based and process-based antecedents on trust are contingent upon customers' prior experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon trust-building literature and the elaboration-likelihood model, we developed a research model and conducted an online survey to users of Didi, the largest ride-sharing platform in China. We used the structural equation modeling technique to analyze the collected data and examine the proposed research model.

Findings

Ther major research findings of the study suggest that structural assurance, government support, platform reputation and disposition to trust exhibit significant and different degrees of influences on customers' trust beliefs and continuance intention toward ride-sharing. A multi-group analysis further suggests that customers with less use experience focus more on government support and platform reputation, while customers with more use experience are more likely influenced by structural assurance.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the extant literature by identifying the joint influences of institutional-based, process-based and characteristic-based antecedents on users' continuance intention of ride-sharing service and uncovers the mediation mechanism of trust and perceived risk. Moreover, the study refines the boundary condition of the proposed research model by revealing the moderating effect of use experience.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Claude R. Martin, David A. Horne and Anne Marie Schultz

This paper addresses a major impediment to business‐to‐business service innovation. The focus is on the role played by the client in a service dominant offering, compared…

Abstract

This paper addresses a major impediment to business‐to‐business service innovation. The focus is on the role played by the client in a service dominant offering, compared to product dominant offerings. Part of this concerns the concept of customer input uncertainty includng the diversity of customer demand and the customer’s disposition to participate in the innovation process. The paper concludes by tracking and innovation process in a consultation between a major global consulting firm and one of its clients.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Jorge Vera

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between perceived brand quality (PBQ), customer perceived value (CPV) and disposition to pay a higher price (DHP…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between perceived brand quality (PBQ), customer perceived value (CPV) and disposition to pay a higher price (DHP) for a product. Such an assessment also seeks to determine if consumer involvement and brand performance measurements have moderating effects on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a sample of n = 1,029 purchasers of six different product categories were analysed. The respondents evaluated a product with items based on involvement profile scales. The chosen brands were evaluated using perceived quality, value and brand performance items. Respondents were also asked if a higher price for the chosen product/brand would be paid. Structural modelling was implemented. To corroborate moderating effects, a nested comparison invariance test for structural weights was used.

Findings

PBQ has a direct effect on CPV but not on DHP. CPV has a mild effect on DHP. Involvement and brand performance moderating effects were confirmed.

Originality/value

Brand quality is assumed as a strategy to achieve a higher price disposition through customer value in contrast with previous empirical literature that puts the price as a sign of quality. DHP is argued as a measurement to indicate “superior customer perceived value”. This variable would be different from and more difficult to achieve than CPV.

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Book part

Daniel R. Clark and Jeffrey G. Covin

The literature on international entrepreneurship offers two competing views on why new ventures internationalize: (a) the nature of the opportunity pulls them…

Abstract

The literature on international entrepreneurship offers two competing views on why new ventures internationalize: (a) the nature of the opportunity pulls them international or (b) the founder pushes the firm international. While these two internationalization drivers are not independent, they do represent unique causal mechanisms. Previously, the tools available to understand the entrepreneur’s disposition toward internationalization were limited. The present study uses the theoretical foundation of the international entrepreneurial orientation construct and from it develops and tests an attitudinally-based individual-level measure of disposition toward internationalization. To ensure the validity and reliability of the new measure, termed International Entrepreneurial Orientation Disposition, studies were conducted to: develop new scale items, examine their psychometric properties and construct validity, and demonstrate criterion validity. A strong measurement model is developed using structural equation modeling (CFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.07), and the measure is shown to be useful as a predictor of perceived international venture attractiveness.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

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Article

Lucía Melián‐Alzola and Víctor Padrón‐Robaina

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role and importance of results in B2C e‐commerce from the customer's perspective, together with impact on overall perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role and importance of results in B2C e‐commerce from the customer's perspective, together with impact on overall perceived quality and customer attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The data base for this study was obtained from a sample of 191 individuals who had purchased on the internet and the techniques used in the statistical analysis of the data were as follows: principal components analysis, structural equations and regression analyses.

Findings

Two dimensions – cost and guarantee – explain value in e‐commerce. In the data resulting from the analyses, guarantee turns out to be a more important factor with respect to overall perceived quality and consumer attitudes than cost.

Research limitations/implications

If a company manages to improve its e‐commerce transaction results, this will have a favorable effect on overall perceived quality and consumer attitudes. In other words, the result is as important as the process for a successful purchase.

Practical implications

The scale, integrated for the dimensions “guarantee” and “cost” should help firms to identify and improve their B2C e‐commerce results from the customer perspective. Consequently, it will have a positive effect on overall quality, disposition to repeat and disposition to recommend.

Originality/value

Companies operating on the internet will find a number of suggestions in this paper on how to achieve competitive advantage through the successful management of their websites, improving results – guarantee and cost – to customers.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Harjit Sekhon, Sanjit Roy, Gurvinder Shergill and Adrian Pritchard

This empirical paper aims to assess the multi-dimensional nature of trust in service relationships. Although trust is deemed to be important for managing service…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical paper aims to assess the multi-dimensional nature of trust in service relationships. Although trust is deemed to be important for managing service relationships there is a dearth of research looking at its multidimensional nature outside of Western markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is undertaken in three countries: UK, Hong Kong and India (September to November 2010). The sample consists of more than 300 sample members from across the three countries with an approximately even split between each.

Findings

The findings show that cognitive trust does not significantly impact affective trust, but the other relationships in the model are supported. Customer ' s disposition to trust impacts both cognitive and overall trust.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides direction for services marketing scholars and practitioners, but there are limitations because not all types of financial institutions are evaluated.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this work are profound given that transnational operations of most retail banks. Understanding trust dimensions aids relationship managers to devise differentiated strategies to build/re-build and maintain long-term trust relationships with customers.

Originality/value

This work extends the understanding of relationships, but by rooting the work in retail banking it provides new insights for academics and practitioners. For service marketing scholars, this study calls into question some of the multi-dimensional nature of trust and for practitioners it can help aid strategy development.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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