Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Hans Kasper, Josée Bloemer and Paul H. Driessen

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how consumers cope with confusion caused by overload in information and/or choice. The paper investigates whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how consumers cope with confusion caused by overload in information and/or choice. The paper investigates whether consumers who face different degrees of confusion use different coping strategies depending upon their decision‐making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

The Dutch mobile phone market is a typical example of a turbulent market, overloaded with information and/or choice, which creates consumer confusion. A survey was conducted among 203 mobile phone users, using valid and reliable multi‐item scales to measure consumer confusion, decision‐making styles and coping strategies. Cluster analysis and Mancova were used to provide insight into the results.

Findings

The paper finds that consumers of mobile phones can be characterized by combinations of decision‐making styles and find three clusters based on decision‐making styles: “price conscious and cautious” consumers, “brand‐loyal and quality‐driven” consumers, and “functionalist” consumers. Results show significant main effects of the degree of confusion and the decision‐making styles on the use of coping strategies as well as a significant interaction effect of these two. Higher levels of consumer confusion lead to an increased use of seven coping strategies: downsizing the consideration set; keeping status quo; reduced information search; search deferral; buying what others have bought; disengagement from decision; and decision delegation. “Price conscious and cautious” consumers engage less in downsizing the consideration set than the two other clusters, and are less inclined to keep the status quo as compared to “functionalist” consumers.

Originality/value

Because of the intangible and heterogeneous nature of services, knowledge about coping with confusion due to an overload in information and choice is especially important for service providers in their efforts to build and sustain strong relationships with consumers. Practical implications in terms of different approaches on how to cope with confused consumers are provided.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Nguyen T. Thai and Ulku Yuksel

The choice overload (CO) phenomenon, whereby having many options leads to negative consequences, has been studied widely in psychology and marketing. However, empirical…

Abstract

The choice overload (CO) phenomenon, whereby having many options leads to negative consequences, has been studied widely in psychology and marketing. However, empirical evidence of CO in the tourism context is limited, even though people often encounter numerous choices (e.g., vacation destinations, airfares, hotels, tours) at different stages when planning their holidays. Investigating CO in tourism and hospitality is important because (online) travel advisors are providing tourists with numerous choices, yet they do not know whether or not these decision makers are content after choosing from these large choice sets. This chapter proposes to review and apply insights garnered from the CO literature to tourism research. Accordingly, the chapter proposes five groups of solutions for tourists and travel advisors to avoid CO effects: reducing decision task difficulty, reducing choice-set complexity, reducing preference uncertainty, focusing on decision goals rather than the means to achieve those goals, and adopting appropriate decision-making styles.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-690-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Penny M. Simpson, Judy A. Siguaw and John W. Cadogan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the tendency of some consumers to use the purchase behavior of unknown other consumers as a purchase decision heuristic, by first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the tendency of some consumers to use the purchase behavior of unknown other consumers as a purchase decision heuristic, by first developing a measure of the consumer propensity to observe. The effects of likely individual consumer factors are then tested.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 356 consumers participated in the study by completing a questionnaire containing items measuring the constructs of interest. The modeled relationships of variables were tested using structural equation modeling with interaction terms.

Findings

The specified model was found to explain 43 per cent and 44 per cent of consumers' propensity to directly and indirectly observe, respectively. Key antecedents identified as significant influencers of propensity to observe are consumer risk aversion, brand choice overload, self‐confidence, and propensity to conform to group norms. Additionally, moderating effects are identified, indicating that propensity to observe is higher when certain contingencies interact.

Practical implications

The results of this research suggest that: observation is an important heuristic in choice decision for many consumers; specific consumer characteristics define observational consumers for targeting purposes; and retailers should consider observational tendencies of consumers when marketing and merchandising products.

Originality/value

This study is designed to fill this void in the literature by creating and validating a measure of the tendency to be observational; and by examining influencing factors of the one particular heuristic where consumers look to the purchase behavior of other consumers to resolve their own product choice dilemmas.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Patricia Liebesny Broilo, Lélis Balestrin Espartel and Kenny Basso

Because of the increasing volume of information spread in physical and online environments, a consumer intending to purchase a product or service must choose not only what…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the increasing volume of information spread in physical and online environments, a consumer intending to purchase a product or service must choose not only what to buy but also which sources to consult when searching for information that may aid decision-making. This study aims to understand how consumers choose their sources of information in pre-purchase external searches, given the information overproduction scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, data collected through interviews with consumers were analyzed under the technique of content analysis, and the results were synthesized into a framework.

Findings

Consumers tend to consider few sources of information, based on a previously built perception of which sources are more or less appropriate for consultation. Choice tends to be based on pre-established evaluation criteria involving the use of heuristics in the form of socialized images regarding those sources.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the study’s exploratory nature, the proposed framework sheds light into how consumers respond to information overproduction when choosing their sources, providing interesting venues for future investigations.

Practical implications

The study identified the possible occurrence of consumer confusion associated with information sources, extending the theoretical understanding of such a concept. Moreover, it revealed the need for managers to consider specific aspects related to the sources to be included in marketing communications.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address choice of information sources associated with consumer confusion focusing the offline/online scenario.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Erose Sthapit, Giacomo Del Chiappa, Dafnis N. Coudounaris and Peter Bjork

This study aims to examine the relationships among the dimensions of consumption values (functional, social and emotional), co-creation, information overload, satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships among the dimensions of consumption values (functional, social and emotional), co-creation, information overload, satisfaction and continuance intention derived from the use of the Airbnb platform.

Design/methodology/approach

A Web-based survey was conducted among Italians, and a valid sample of 259 persons was obtained for data analysis.

Findings

The survey results indicated that only functional value and social value are strong predictors of satisfaction in the use of the Airbnb website for accommodation booking. Co-creation and absence of information overload also contribute to satisfaction with using the Airbnb website for accommodation booking, which in turn affects continuance intention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are highly destination-specific, given that the authors collected the data only from Italian residents. The sample was based on a snowball sampling technique; thus, the study findings could be misrepresented because of sampling selection bias. Moreover, the study was limited to the use of three dimensions of consumption values, co-creation, information overload and satisfaction to predict continuance intention. Furthermore, the present study adopted a Web-based survey questionnaire.

Practical implications

Managerial implications include recommendations for hosts to emphasise their prices when listing accommodations on the Airbnb website and to focus on active interaction with potential guests. Information on the website should also be organised to avoid information overload.

Originality/value

This study allows a deeper understanding of users’ continuance intention with regards to the Airbnb website by exploring the possible determinants.

目的

本研究考察了消费价值(功能、社会和情感方面)、共同创造、信息超载、满意度与Airbnb平台持续参与使用之间的关系。

设计/方法/方法

研究对意大利人进行了网上调查, 得到了259份有效的抽样数据并进行分析。

调查结果

调查结果显示, 只有功能价值和社会价值才能强烈预测Airbnb网站住宿预订的满意度。共同创造和信息不超载也有助于使用Airbnb网站进行住宿预订的满意度, 这又会影响网站的持续参与使用。

研究限制/影响

这项研究的结果受地域限制, 因为我们只收集了意大利居民的数据。该样本基于滚雪球采样技术, 因此, 由于抽样选择偏差, 研究结果可能被歪曲。该研究还仅限于使用消费价值、共同创造、信息超载和满意度三个维度来预测持续参与使用。此外, 网上调查问卷的发放也可能会影响问卷的质量。

实际含义

本研究的管理意义包括建议房东在Airbnb网站上列出住宿时强调价格, 并专注于与潜在客人的积极互动。房东还应组织网站上的信息, 以避免信息超载。

原创性/价值

这项研究通过探索可能的决定因素, 更深入地了解用户对Airbnb网站的持续参与使用。

x00F3Propósito

Este estudio examina las relaciones entre las dimensiones de los valores de consumo (funcional, social y emocional), co-creación, sobrecarga de información, satisfacción e intención de continuidad, derivada del uso de la plataforma Airbnb.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se realizó una encuesta “en línea”, entre italianos, y se obtuvo para el análisis de datos, una muestra válida de 259 personas.

titleResultados

Los resultados de la encuesta indicaron, que solo el valor funcional y el valor social, son fuertes predictores de la satisfacción en el uso del sitio web de Airbnb a la hora de hacer reservas de alojamiento. La creación conjunta y la ausencia de sobrecarga de información, también contribuyen a la satisfacción de usar el sitio web de Airbnb, para reservar alojamiento, lo que a su vez afecta la intención de continuidad.

Limitaciones/implicaciones de la investigación

Los resultados de este estudio son específicos para un destino, dado que la recolección de los los datos solo se efectúo sobre residentes italianos. La muestra final, se obtuvo con una técnica de muestreo de bolas de nieve; por lo tanto, los resultados del estudio podrían tergiversarse debido al sesgo de selección de muestreo. Además, el estudio se limitó al uso de tres dimensiones de valores de consumo, co-creación, sobrecarga de información y satisfacción para predecir la intención de continuidad. Además, el presente estudio adoptó un cuestionario de encuesta basado en la web.

Implicaciones prácticas

Las implicaciones gerenciales incluyen recomendaciones para que los anfitriones resalten sus precios, al enumerar alojamientos de Airbnb y centrarse en la interacción activa con posibles huéspedes. La información en el sitio web también debe organizarse para evitar la sobrecarga de información.

Originalidad/valor

Este estudio permite una comprensión más profunda sobre la intención de continuidad de los usuarios con respecto al sitio web de Airbnb, al explorar los posibles determinantes que la afectan.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Steven Leon and Hoon Choi

This study aims to examine how the number of choices consumers have influences provider satisfaction, plan satisfaction and positive word-of-mouth (WOM) in the health…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how the number of choices consumers have influences provider satisfaction, plan satisfaction and positive word-of-mouth (WOM) in the health insurance industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares (PLS) and structural equation modeling (SmartPLS) was used to conduct multi-group analysis to analyze the structural models. Data were collected online using Amazon mechanical turk, resulting in 425 respondents.

Findings

This study finds that the number of choices consumers have impacts the strength of provider and plan satisfaction and positive WOM. Also, this study finds that provider satisfaction is generally more impactful than plan satisfaction when generating positive WOM.

Originality/value

This study extends reactance theory, satisfaction and WOM based on choice options to the health insurance industry where credence attributes are prevalent and the analysis includes two satisfaction constructs in the structural model, whereas multiple satisfaction constructs are often overlooked.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ilgım Dara Benoit and Elizabeth G. Miller

This paper aims to identify two boundary conditions (consumption motive and claim set-size) affecting the effectiveness of an advertisement’s creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify two boundary conditions (consumption motive and claim set-size) affecting the effectiveness of an advertisement’s creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Across two experiments, the authors find support for hypotheses using both hedonic vs utilitarian products (Study 1) and hedonic vs utilitarian decision goals within the same product category (Study 2).

Findings

Creativity is more effective for an advertisement when the consumption motive is utilitarian (vs hedonic). Further, using a larger claim set-size within an advertisement increases (decreases) the effectiveness of advertisement creativity for those with hedonic (utilitarian) consumption motives.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the creativity literature by showing when creativity matters depending on the consumption motive and claim set-size. In addition, this research expands the utilitarian vs hedonic consumption literature by highlighting another way in which these two motives differ. Finally, this study expands the claim set-size literature by demonstrating that the effects of claim set-size depend on both consumption motive and features of the ad (i.e. its level of creativity).

Practical implications

These findings help marketers manage their advertising budget more effectively and efficiently knowing when advertisement creativity matters and thus when to invest in creativity.

Originality/value

The present research is the first to explicitly study boundary conditions for when ad creativity matters and shows that creativity matters more (i.e. enhances persuasiveness of the ad and attitudes toward the ad) when the consumption motive is utilitarian, especially when ads have small claim set-size. Additionally, creativity matters for hedonic consumption contexts if the advertisement has a large claim size.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Krisztina Rita Dörnyei, Athanasios Krystallis and Polymeros Chrysochou

This paper aims to investigate the impact of assortment size and attribute quantity on the depth and content of consumer information searches.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of assortment size and attribute quantity on the depth and content of consumer information searches.

Design/methodology/approach

For a computer-aided experiment using an information display board, participants (n = 393) were placed in a simulated shopping situation that involved choosing a product among three sets of frequently purchased, low-involvement, FMCG alternatives.

Findings

The findings show that when the assortment size increases, consumers acquire information from more products and cues but sacrifice product attributes. In particular, this sacrifice comes at the expense of secondary product attributes (e.g. nutrition information, country of origin), whereas primary product attributes (e.g. brand name, price) remain constant. Attribute quantity does not have a significant effect on information search.

Practical implications

Provided that several strategies rely on providing more information to consumers with the aim of making more deliberate and better choices, the findings suggest that they may have a limited effect in product categories in which the assortment size is wide. The authors discuss the implications for category management and public policy.

Originality/value

Information searches are measured by means of three different variables (searched cues, searched products and searched attributes), which enable a more complex exploration of the consumer information search process.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tulsi Jayakumar

The purpose of this paper is to understand the behavioral lessons and managerial implications of deep discount strategies used by e-commerce firms to gain a competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the behavioral lessons and managerial implications of deep discount strategies used by e-commerce firms to gain a competitive advantage over rivals. The paper seeks to understand the behavioral aspects of consumer and competitor response to such online sales, particularly with reference to e-satisfaction and e-loyalty. The case study seeks to: understand the behavioral aspects of utility and customer satisfaction; understand the behavioral aspects influencing customer attitudes, preferences and choice; understand heuristics involved in consumer decision-making; and understand possible firm strategies based on a thorough analysis of behavioral influencers of customer decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a case study approach. Secondary data sources from the library, company website and newspaper articles have been used to build a case which would encourage students to discuss and analyze the application of principles of behavioral economics to marketing problems faced especially by e-retailers. It uses Flipkart’s botched-up Big-Billion Day sale to drive home lessons in behavioral economics to marketers.

Findings

With growing internet penetration, e-retail presents high potential in India along with its BRICS peers. However, the task of grabbing customer mindshare, as also a share of wallet of the growing Indian purchasing power through monster discounts and deals by e-tailers may not work. Firms such as Flipkart may strategize using principles of behavioral economics including confirmatory bias, framing effects, reference points, principles of loss aversion, heuristics and the peak–end rule to influence customer decision-making in their favor. They must also guard against any incidents/events which invoke the representativeness heuristic or negative confirmatory biases towards e-commerce portals.

Practical implications

E-tailers in countries like India should understand the behavioral implications of deep discount strategies and deals offered by them as a means of gaining competitive advantage. Attention to e-service outcome quality and e-service recovery is important.

Originality/value

The case is unique in its applications of behavioral economics principles to e-retailing in India. It seeks to apply behavioral principles to a major e-commerce marketing event in India. With the e-commerce industry likely to boom in India, the case study provides unique insights into competitive pricing strategies adopted by e-retailers and the feasibility thereof.

1 – 10 of over 6000