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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Craig Webster and Stanislav Ivanov

427

Abstract

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 March 2020

Craig Webster and Stanislav Ivanov

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how demographic changes in developed countries will continue to drive the tourism and hospitality industries to adopt automation in…

5161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how demographic changes in developed countries will continue to drive the tourism and hospitality industries to adopt automation in business operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is an analysis of the trends in human reproduction in the developed countries and a discussion of their implications for the travel, tourism and hospitality industries.

Findings

There are three major solutions to the demographic problem faced in developed countries and the replacement of human labour with automation is the most practical, immediate and has the fewest risks and negative externalities.

Practical implications

Industry has to adapt to the new demographic reality and embrace automation of services, educate their customers and have policies to deal with the resistance expected by labour.

Social implications

Society can expect that many of the tasks they commonly expect humans to be involved in will be done by machines and artificial intelligence in the near future, if demographic trends continue and massive immigration into developed countries is not a continuing phenomenon.

Originality/value

This links the relationship between demographic trends to the use of automation in the travel, tourism and hospitality industries.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Craig Webster and Stanislav Ivanov

Future tourism will take place in a robonomic economy (aka robonomics). The massive introduction of robots, artificial intelligence and automation technologies which will…

928

Abstract

Purpose

Future tourism will take place in a robonomic economy (aka robonomics). The massive introduction of robots, artificial intelligence and automation technologies which will lead to the advent of an economy that will be qualitatively different from the current economy. The robonomic economy will have profound implications on the nature of work, level and sources of incomes, leisure time, politics, international trade and relations, ownership rights, etc., hence leading to major social, economic and political challenges and tension. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on how tourism will be in a robonomic society.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a perspective paper that shows how tourism will be in a robonomic society. This is a conceptual perspective article that shows how tourism will be in a robonomic society.

Findings

This paper elaborates on the tourism/hospitality implications of robonomics, the positive and negative impacts of robonomics on tourism and vice versa.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to discuss tourism implications of a future automated society.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Craig Webster

2221

Abstract

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Craig Webster, David Jacobson and Kelsey Shapiro

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the position of Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot professionals in the hotel and tourism industry on the island of Cyprus with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the position of Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot professionals in the hotel and tourism industry on the island of Cyprus with regards to their expectations regarding the benefit of a political solution to the Cyprus problem on the island.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data from two surveys in both political entities of the island. One survey is a survey of hotel owners, managers of hotels and travel agencies in both political entities on the island. The other is semi-structured interview with leading professionals in the hospitality and tourism industry in both political entities.

Findings

The surveys indicate that there is an expectation from professionals in both entities that tourism will benefit all following a solution, with large increases in incoming tourism to Cyprus.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that there are substantial expectations that there will be benefits for all following a solution to the Cyprus problem.

Originality/value

This is a first future-oriented paper regarding the expectations of major players in the hotel and tourism industry in both political entities on the island.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Craig Webster and Stanislav Ivanov

The purpose of this paper is to identify the link between political ideology and the management of tourism in countries. The authors stipulate that the predominant…

8582

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the link between political ideology and the management of tourism in countries. The authors stipulate that the predominant political ideology in the country influences the nature and logic of state interventions in the tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper elaborates several case studies from various countries – Bulgaria, Cyprus, Scandinavia, Russia, USA, China, Japan, Indonesia, and North Korea.

Findings

Countries with predominant (neo)liberal ideology do not typically interfere in tourism regulation, while nationalism leads governments to stimulate inbound and domestic tourism. Communist ideological approaches tend to be burdensome, inhibiting growth while stressing the promotion of the socialist achievements of a country. Countries that are traditionally thought of as social democratic have been evolving in recent years to regulate tourism in ways that are more liberal in nature than social democratic.

Practical implications

Political ideologies shape the acceptability of government support for private tourist companies, legislation in field of tourism, limitation/stimulation of inbound/outbound tourist flows. For the future the authors expect greater politicisation of tourism, active tourism “wars” between countries, greater control of governments on populations, thriving nationalism, “aggressive” environmentalism.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to discuss the impact of the political ideology on the management of tourism at the national level.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Craig Webster

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the political turbulence of the times and discuss how political movements and political events that appear to be shocking to many…

2330

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the political turbulence of the times and discuss how political movements and political events that appear to be shocking to many are linked with major transformations in the global economy in recent decades. The author shows how the political and economic situation will likely have little impact on tourism inflows in major developed countries in coming years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores global changes since the end of the Cold War and how this has impacted upon potential tourists in tourist source markets and host destinations. It is a global analysis, exploring changes since the Cold War.

Findings

Western countries will continue to experience all sorts of political and social turbulence for the foreseeable future, as their populations become increasingly bifurcated in terms of their wealth and the fiat currency system and fractional reserve system of banking reaches the limits of what it is capable of. However, this does not necessarily mean that tourists will be deterred from travelling to developed countries, as long as the developed countries shield visitors from social upheaval and politically unpleasant events such as strikes, riots, and demonstrations.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that managers in the tourism industry should become increasingly aware of the widening gap between the rich and poor in developed countries and prepare for the political and social shocks of dealing with this phenomenon. The phenomenon will have political expression in political movements that will pay lip service to populist demands but will also have expression in disappointed populations that will take part in social unrest of all sorts. Managers should prepare for various expressions of unrest in developed countries that had not been so widespread, including strikes, demonstrations, and riots.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the ascendency of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the increasing visibility of other political nonconformist movements in western countries as a possible threat to tourism in developed countries. It links the changing political and social reality of citizens since the end of the Cold War to the future role that developed countries will play in the tourism industry, largely as hosts to the world’s affluent class created by globalization.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Craig Webster, Chih-Lun (Alan) Yen and Sotiris Hji-Avgoustis

Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a controversial bill passed by the State of Indiana and signed into law in March 2015. The purpose of this paper is to look…

Abstract

Purpose

Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a controversial bill passed by the State of Indiana and signed into law in March 2015. The purpose of this paper is to look into whether there is empirical evidence that the political shock of RFRA had a negative empirical impact upon the hotel industry in Indiana’s major city, Indianapolis, and investigate how DMOs and other organizations in the tourism and hospitality industry worked in ways to counteract the threat of a great deal of loss of business caused by the national furor caused by the passing of the original bill in March 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

To fully examine the impact of RFRA on hospitality business in Indiana, secondary data were used in this study. The researchers used the Trend Market report created by Smith Travel Research (STR) (2016b) with a focus on the greater Indianapolis area, which include Indianapolis South East, Indianapolis Central Business District, Indianapolis Airport/Speedway, Indianapolis North Loop, and Indianapolis small towns. In the Trend Market report, hotel operation performance results are listed including occupancy percentage, average daily rate, revenue per available room, supply, demand, and revenue.

Findings

The findings from this investigation illustrate that there is no empirical reason to believe that the political shock of the RFRA controversy in Indiana in 2015 had a meaningful impact upon the hospitality and tourism industry in Indianapolis, despite concerns that it would make a big and negative impact upon the industry. While event planners may have a negative perception of the city of Indianapolis and the state, these perceptions do not seem to be enough to make a difference in terms of impacting upon the hospitality industry in Indianapolis.

Originality/value

There are lessons that could be learned from this, as many states in the USA continue to pass similar laws to RFRA, laws that are perceived as being problematic for those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. The most noteworthy lesson is that the passing of laws that seem to threaten people of the LGBT community will bring a national response and will likely be accompanied with threats that are economic in nature. There is a great deal of evidence to show that passing any legislation that may be interpreted as infringing upon the rights of members of the LGBT community will result in substantial responses that may be negative in nature.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2022

Stanislav Ivanov and Craig Webster

The hospitality industry in developed countries is under pressure due to labor shortages and it is likely more food and beverage operations will have to be automated in…

Abstract

Purpose

The hospitality industry in developed countries is under pressure due to labor shortages and it is likely more food and beverage operations will have to be automated in the future. This research investigates the public’s perceptions of the use of robots in food and beverage operations to learn about how the public perceives automation in food and beverage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey disseminated online in 12 languages, resulting in a sample of 1,579 respondents. The data were analyzed using factor analysis and OLS regressions.

Findings

The data also reveal that generally positive attitudes toward the use of robots in tourism and hospitality is a strong indicator of positive attitudes toward the use of robots in an F&B setting. The data also illustrate that the public’s perception of appropriateness of the use of robots in F&B operations is positively related to robots’ perceived reliability, functionality and advantages compared to human employees.

Research limitations/implications

The implications illustrate that the public seems to be generally accepting robots in food and beverage operations, even considering the public’s understanding and acceptance of the limitations of such technologies.

Practical implications

The research suggests that a critical element in terms of incorporating automation into future food and beverage operations is encouraging consumers to have generally positive attitudes toward the use of robots in hospitality and tourism industries.

Originality/value

This survey is based upon the data gathered in multiple countries to learn about how individuals perceive the use of robots in food and beverage operations, illustrating the attitudes that will assist or hinder the automation of this service industry.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Stanislav Ivanov and Craig Webster

This paper aims to investigate potential consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality, and the factors that shape their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate potential consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality, and the factors that shape their willingness to pay.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey yielded a sample of 1,573 respondents from 99 countries. Independent samples t-test, Analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster, factor and regression analyses were used.

Findings

Respondents expected to pay less for robot-delivered services than human-delivered services. Two clusters were identified: one cluster willing to pay nearly the same price for robotic services as for human-delivered services, whilst the other expected deep discounts for robotic services. The willingness-to-pay was positively associated with the attitudes towards robots in tourism, robotic service experience expectations, men and household size. It was negatively associated to travel frequency, age and education.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s main limitation is its exploratory nature and the use of a hypothetical scenario in measuring respondents’ willingness to pay. The data were gathered prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and do not reflect the potential changes in perceptions of robots due to the pandemic.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to focus on improving the attitudes towards robots in tourism because they are strongly and positively related to the willingness to pay. The marketing messages need to form positive expectations about robotic services.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to investigate consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality and factors that shape their willingness to pay.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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