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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

BRENDA COOK

Any librarian who has been faced with the problem of cataloguing the course unit booklets supplied by the Open University as the framework of its teaching will have…

Abstract

Any librarian who has been faced with the problem of cataloguing the course unit booklets supplied by the Open University as the framework of its teaching will have discovered how bibliographically intractable they are. This article seeks first to describe some of the problems thus encountered, and secondly to describe how one institution has attempted to solve them.

Details

Library Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Carol Couture

Based for more than fifteen years at the School of Librarianship and Information Sciences (hereinafter referred to as the EBSI) records management training has firm roots…

Abstract

Based for more than fifteen years at the School of Librarianship and Information Sciences (hereinafter referred to as the EBSI) records management training has firm roots at the University of Montreal. Even when relations between librarianship and records management were at their lowest — I am thinking here of the “battle of the manuscripts” in 1973 — the EBSI continued to offer records management training. A tradition has been established and this is not to be sneezed at because, like Rome, university courses cannot be built in a day. Maurice Lebel, the famous Quebec academic, once said, “It takes 25 years of hard work to build up a quality department.” The EBSI celebrated its twenty fifth anniversary in 1987, and records management courses have now been running in the department for some fifteen years. We can therefore rightly claim that at the University of Montreal records management is able to develop within the framework of a well‐established school.

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Records Management Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Ming Yin Ming, Dion Hoe‐lian Goh, Ee‐Peng Lim and Aixin Sun

A web site usually contains a large number of concept entities, each consisting of one or more web pages connected by hyperlinks. In order to discover these concept…

Abstract

A web site usually contains a large number of concept entities, each consisting of one or more web pages connected by hyperlinks. In order to discover these concept entities for more expressive web site queries and other applications, the web unit mining problem has been proposed. Web unit mining aims to determine web pages that constitute a concept entity and classify concept entities into categories. Nevertheless, the performance of an existing web unit mining algorithm, iWUM, suffers as it may create more than one web unit (incomplete web units) from a single concept entity. This paper presents two methods to solve this problem. The first method introduces a more effective web fragment construction method so as reduce later classification errors. The second method incorporates site‐specific knowledge to discover and handle incomplete web units. Experiments show that incomplete web units can be removed and overall accuracy has been significantly improved, especially on the precision and F1 measures.

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International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Bo Xia, Nur Rosly, Peng Wu, Adrian Bridge and Josua Pienaar

The increasing need for sustainability-literate construction professionals has prompted higher education institutions to incorporate a sustainability agenda education into…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing need for sustainability-literate construction professionals has prompted higher education institutions to incorporate a sustainability agenda education into their construction courses. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the sustainability knowledge embedded into a quantity surveying (QS) undergraduate course.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) as a case study, analysis of sustainability knowledge embedded into the QS course is conducted by examining the content of QS course structure, unit aims, learning outcomes, assessment framework and weekly lecture and tutorial materials.

Findings

The results show that the “incorporation approach”, i.e. the practice of incorporating the sustainability themes into existing relevant subjects, is mainly used in delivering the sustainability knowledge to the QS students. Additionally, it is found that in its QS course, QUT has covered all aspects of sustainability comprehensively from an environmental viewpoint and with regard, to economic, social and governance aspects.

Practical implications

This research also proposes recommendations for further improvement of the sustainability education in the QUT QS course and beyond.

Originality/value

This study revealed the current practices and approaches of incorporating sustainability knowledge into QS education programme and addressed the knowledge requirements of future sustainability literate QS professionals.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Jean L. Dyer

Each of the four objectives can be applied within the military training environment. Military training often requires that soldiers achieve specific levels of performance…

Abstract

Each of the four objectives can be applied within the military training environment. Military training often requires that soldiers achieve specific levels of performance or proficiency in each phase of training. For example, training courses impose entrance and graduation criteria, and awards are given for excellence in military performance. Frequently, training devices, training media, and training evaluators or observers also directly support the need to diagnose performance strengths and weaknesses. Training measures may be used as indices of performance, and to indicate the need for additional or remedial training.

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The Science and Simulation of Human Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-296-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Andrew Doig and Steve Hogg

‘I like the fact that it's simple; I like the fact that it's not too complicated, and I think that whoever developed it, developed it with the people in mind’. Blended…

Abstract

‘I like the fact that it's simple; I like the fact that it's not too complicated, and I think that whoever developed it, developed it with the people in mind’. Blended learning master's student talking about Solent Online Learning.The authors carried out an extended project aimed at making effective use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for the delivery of high-quality online distance and blended learning. This was in response to a greater demand for such courses through the emergence of a new constituency of learner, principally professional learners, those already in employment but seeking to improve their level of qualification and employability through the study of flexibly delivered credit bearing courses. The growth of this constituency can be seen very much as a response to the changes to the funding structure in the higher education sector in the UK. To this end, the authors worked within a team that developed an approach to effective course design, the Solent Online Learning Standard, and then a new methodology for collaborating with academic staff in the development and delivery of such courses. In order to best facilitate this, the team also created a new instance of its institutional VLE, called Solent Online Learning and tailored more to the needs of these new professional learners.

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Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Paul S. Hoffman

This article describes the development and evolution of Library 110: Introduction to Library Research, which integrated information literacy into the curriculum through…

Abstract

This article describes the development and evolution of Library 110: Introduction to Library Research, which integrated information literacy into the curriculum through the general education program at the Univesity of Nebraska, Lincoln. By redesigning and migrating the course to an electronic environment, several benefits resulted.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Russell Waugh and John Godfrey

Reports the results of a qualitative, cross‐sectional studyinvolving a survey of 549 teachers′ perceptions of the Unit Curriculumsystem in 22 metropolitan state senior…

Abstract

Reports the results of a qualitative, cross‐sectional study involving a survey of 549 teachers′ perceptions of the Unit Curriculum system in 22 metropolitan state senior high schools in Perth, Western Australia, in the context of system‐wide change, within a centralized educational system. Surveyed perceptions of six general variables applied to the specific case of the Unit Curriculum system. These variables are: perceived cost benefit to the teacher; perceived practicality in the classroom; alleviation of fears and concerns; participation in school decisions on aspects affecting the classrooms; perceived support from senior staff; and feelings towards the previous system compared to the new system. Suggests these variables offer pointers to educational administrators on how best to tailor system‐wide changes so that teachers will be more receptive to the changes in the implementation stage.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

John Reed

Management education courses are being developed at the LublinBusiness School, Poland in collaboration with the Lancashire BusinessSchool of the University of Central…

Abstract

Management education courses are being developed at the Lublin Business School, Poland in collaboration with the Lancashire Business School of the University of Central Lancashire, UK. These developments are supported by the UK Government Knowhow Fund. The first of these courses, an Advanced Certificate in Management for practising middle and senior managers, was first delivered during 1991‐92 and validated by the UK partner in July 1992. Higher level courses, a Diploma in Management and an MBA, are being developed and the partners hope to validate these courses during 1993. Describes the content and structure of the courses, together with a quality assurance and assessment regime which is innovative in the Polish context. In developing these courses the partners have attempted to avoid the known problems associated with such transfers of know‐how. Identifies these problems and discusses the ways in which they were addressed by the Lublin project.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Heather J. Leslie

The purpose of this paper is to describe an online faculty development pilot course on how to engage students online. A framework was used, referred to as the Trifecta of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an online faculty development pilot course on how to engage students online. A framework was used, referred to as the Trifecta of Student Engagement, for the design of the course. The Trifecta of Student Engagement proposes that students, in order to be fully engaged in a course, need to be engaged with their course content, with their peers and with their instructor. The course has three units of content that each correspond to the Trifecta of Student Engagement. This course has gone through one pilot with faculty and has impacted students and faculty positively.

Design/methodology/approach

An online faculty development course was piloted with eight faculty members across a range of disciplines who participated in the program. After taking the course, they had to apply the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework to a course they taught and share what they did via written report, webinar, or web presentation. This study summarized the faculty participants’ written reports and presentations as well as provided a qualitative evaluation on the impact this course had on students and faculty.

Findings

After faculty applied the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework to courses taught, faculty saw an improvement in student engagement, satisfaction, learning and achievement. Three faculty surveyed students to determine their engagement and satisfaction and found students to respond positively to the use of tools and activities for student-to-content engagement, student-to-student engagement and student-to-instructor engagement. Two faculty examined student grades to determine if there were changes in student outcomes. One professor saw average grades increase by 11 percent. Another professor saw grades improve by 8 percent. She also found that student assessment of learning increased by 0.57. Both faculty attributed the improvement to the effectiveness of the teaching strategies employed.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the eight faculty who participated in the pilot. Some faculty used methods to attempt to measure the impacts of their teaching practices by surveying students and looking at student performance data. A second pilot is needed for additional faculty to take the course and apply the Trifecta of Engagement framework to generate more data for impact.

Practical implications

Institutions looking to create an online teaching professional development course for faculty can utilize the Trifecta of Student Engagement framework for their course design. Additionally, faculty can read about tools and strategies that they can immediately apply to create more student-to-content engagement, student-to-student engagement and student-to-instructor engagement.

Social implications

Faculty can be more intentional in how they engage students in their online course experience.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on faculty development regarding student-centered teaching practices. Other institutions looking to create a faculty development course or program that utilizes a student-centered framework may find aspects of this paper useful for their own online teaching professional development initiatives.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

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