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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2011

Bashar S. Gammoh, Kevin E. Voss and Ryan Skiver

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how brand equity levels influence the evaluation of continuous vs discontinuous innovation of new products and the moderating…

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5077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how brand equity levels influence the evaluation of continuous vs discontinuous innovation of new products and the moderating effects of consumer's product category knowledge (PCK).

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2 between‐subjects experiment that varied innovation type (continuous/discontinuous) and brand equity level (high/low) was conducted in order to test study hypotheses.

Findings

Study results offer new understanding of how brand equity and PCK influence subject's evaluation of discontinuous vs continuous innovation and provides valuable managerial insights into the potential value of such strategies.

Originality/value

Being innovative is critical to companies' success. Yet, almost half of the new products introduced in the USA are either cancelled or fail to meet targeted financial returns. Within this reality, it is not surprising that research into consumer response to new product innovation has grown over the last decade. This paper extends the current literature by explicating the interaction effects of two sources of knowledge on influencing consumer evaluation of innovation, that is, PCK as well as brand‐specific knowledge as reflected by brand equity level.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Annika Steiber and Sverker Alänge

History is full of companies that were once innovative leaders but lost their innovative ability. The purpose of this paper is to explore, from a firm‐level perspective…

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24673

Abstract

Purpose

History is full of companies that were once innovative leaders but lost their innovative ability. The purpose of this paper is to explore, from a firm‐level perspective, organizational characteristics for continuous innovation in rapidly changing industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings from 28 interviews at Google Inc., are compared to previous research on organizational characteristics for continuous innovation.

Findings

Google's organization can be viewed as a dynamic and open corporate system for continuous innovation, involving the entire organization and supported by an innovation‐oriented and change‐prone top management and board. The relative importance of eight organizational characteristics in this corporate system is elaborated upon.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for empirical research contributing to the development of a more comprehensive analytical framework for continuous innovation, including the role of culture and selection/facilitation of self‐organizing individuals in innovation processes; and to study how to organize for both continuous innovation and continuous improvements.

Practical implications

The importance of factors such as culture and the selection of individuals, identified in the empirical study, needs to be considered by managers, and might influence their understanding of how to sustain continuous innovation over time.

Originality/value

This paper provides, from a firm‐level perspective and based on a unique access to empirical data, increased understanding of organizational characteristics conducive to continuous innovation in rapidly changing industries, and highlights the importance of characteristics that received less emphasis in previous research literature.

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Minna Saunila

The purpose of this paper is to define measures that small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can use for evaluating continuous innovation and to analyze types of SMEs…

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1484

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define measures that small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can use for evaluating continuous innovation and to analyze types of SMEs, according to the innovation measures they use and their characteristics in terms of size and operational and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered with the help of a structured survey questionnaire from a cross-section of firms in both the manufacturing and service sectors in Finland. The data were analyzed in terms of factor and cluster analyses.

Findings

Three measures of continuous innovation and three types of SMEs were defined based on their continuous innovation measures. It was found that firms using all three types of innovation measures also register above-average financial and operational performance compared to those that do not.

Originality/value

This study attempts to improve the precision of performance measurement and the management of continuous innovation in firms by expanding and refining existing measurement guidelines and principles. In particular, this work approaches the subject of continuous innovation measurement from the standpoint of SMEs.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Rodney McAdam, Peter Stevenson and Gren Armstrong

With increasing market pressure and fragmentation Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) must move beyond the change philosophy of Continuous Improvement (CI) and…

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5661

Abstract

With increasing market pressure and fragmentation Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) must move beyond the change philosophy of Continuous Improvement (CI) and develop a culture of innovation. To find out if SMEs could go beyond CI to achieve effective business innovation as a change management philosophy, a literature survey and a research survey on 15 SMEs was conducted to provide additional relevant information. The main research findings were: the SMEs exhibited a range of Continuous Improvement and innovation characteristics – some had adopted a culture of Continuous Improvement, while others had not; the SMEs which had adopted a culture of Continuous Improvement found that it could provide a solid foundation on which to build a culture of effective business innovation; and these SMEs were found to have embraced all the different components of innovation, as measured, more readily than those SMEs which did not have a culture of Continuous Improvement.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Vimal Kumar and R.R.K. Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to examine leadership styles and their impact on TQM focus within Indian firms.

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1252

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine leadership styles and their impact on TQM focus within Indian firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data for this study were drawn from a survey of 111 firms in India to examine the validity and reliability of the independent constructs (leadership styles: transformational, servant, adaptive, rational and kinesthetic); and two dependent constructs (TQM focus: continuous improvement and innovation). The data were analyzed employing correlation and multiple regression analysis to identify the influence of leadership styles on TQM focus.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that six of the nine hypotheses have a significant and positive relationship with TQM focus; one hypothesis is partial while rest two hypotheses are not associated with TQM focus. It is also found that leadership styles are more inclined to continuous improvement and perceived as dominant TQM practices than innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This study used only two major variables, continuous improvement and innovation, as the outcome of TQM focus, but the outcomes are not limited. TQM focus is also related to other variables such as customer focus, product quality, employee involvement, benchmarking, etc. Future research should be extended by using other variables as the outcome of TQM focus.

Originality/value

The results can be beneficial for the current organization’s leaders to achieve appropriate leadership styles for effective and TQM focus. Moreover, this paper also attempts to inspire researchers to include the TQM focus in studying the effect of the leaders on TQM focus while implementing it effectively in the organizations.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Jing Xu, Rémy Houssin, Emmanuel Caillaud and Mickaël Gardoni

The purpose of this research is to explore the mechanisms of knowledge management (KM) for innovation and provide an approach for enterprises to leverage KM activities

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5513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the mechanisms of knowledge management (KM) for innovation and provide an approach for enterprises to leverage KM activities into continuous innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing the literature from multidisciplinary fields, the concepts of knowledge, KM and innovation are investigated. The physical, human and technological perspectives of KM are distinguished with the identification of two core activities for innovation: knowledge creation and knowledge usage. Then an essential requirement for continuous innovation – an internalization phase – is defined. The systems thinking and human‐centered perspectives are adopted for providing a comprehensive understanding about the mechanisms of KM for innovation.

Findings

A networking process of continuous innovation based on KM is proposed by incorporating the phase of internalization. Three sources of organizational knowledge assets in innovation are identified. Then, based on the two core activities of innovation, a meta‐model and a macro process of KM are proposed to model the mechanisms of KM for continuous innovation. Then, in order to operationalize the KM mechanisms, a hierarchical model with four layers is constructed by integrating three sources of knowledge assets, the meta‐model and the macro process into the process of continuous innovation.

Practical implications

According to the lessons learned about KM practices in previous research, the three perspectives of KM should collaborate with one another for successful implementation of KM projects for innovation; the networking process of innovation provides a new way to integrate KM process in innovation; the hierarchical model provides a suitable architecture to implement systems of KM for innovation.

Originality/value

The meta‐model and macro process of KM explain how the next generation of KM can help the value creation and support the continuous innovation from the systems thinking perspective. The hierarchical model illustrates the complicated knowledge dynamics in the process of continuous innovation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Arghya Ghosh, Takao Kato and Hodaka Morita

The purpose of this chapter is to provide fresh evidence and insights on a causal link from product market competition to the nature and scope of employee involvement…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide fresh evidence and insights on a causal link from product market competition to the nature and scope of employee involvement using a case study of two Japanese manufacturing firms.

The firm’s investment decision on two kinds of innovation activities, discrete innovation and continuous improvement, is likely to be a key driver for the adoption (or lack thereof) of the high-performance work system (HPWS) and employee involvement programs. As product market competitionintensifies (e.g., rising international competition and weakening exclusivesupplier–manufacturer relationships), the firm is likely to shift its innovation strategy from bottom-up continuous improvement activities, which almost always accompany employee involvement, to top-down discrete innovation activities, which downplays employee involvement. Such a shift of the firm’s innovation strategy results in declining employee involvement.

This study will inform policymakers, practitioners of management, and the public about the importance of paying particular attention to the firm’s innovation strategy in understanding the interplay between product market competition and the HPWS and employee involvement.

In spite of the rich body of evidence on the effects of HPWS, there are at least two relatively unexplored yet potentially important questions: (i) The conditions under which the HPWS is best introduced and best sustained; and (ii) in what way the HPWS will need to evolve when external environments change. Our findings fill this important gap in the literature by providing novel evidence and insight on the causal link from product market competition to employee involvement.

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Vimal Kumar and R.R.K. Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to develop a relationship between the leader’s management problem-solving styles (MPSS) and total quality management (TQM) focus.

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1652

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a relationship between the leader’s management problem-solving styles (MPSS) and total quality management (TQM) focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on C.G. Jung’s (1923) four psychological functions or cognitive styles, which are involved in information gathering and evaluation by sensing, intuitive, thinking, and feeling. The combination of these psychological functions makes possible ways of results: sensing-thinking (ST), sensing-feeling (SF), intuitive-thinking (NT), and intuitive-feeling (NF) for management problem solving. The empirical data for this study were drawn from a survey of 111 firms in India. A one-way analysis of variance approach has been applied for analysis in this study.

Findings

The authors review the extant literature and present a conceptual framework to establish the relationship between different management problem-solving styles and TQM focus. The literature on TQM shows two distinct achievable results: continuous improvement and innovation. The findings of the study support all the hypotheses and the results show that leaders with ST and SF profile are comfortable with the continuous improvement while leaders with NT and NF profile focus on innovation in the organization.

Practical implications

The results of this study emphasize the importance of knowing the appropriate MPSS to TQM focus. The results will help leaders in continuous improvement and innovation to make proper decisions and smooth functions to achieve maximum performance.

Originality/value

This paper can be useful for the organizations to achieve more effective leadership in decision making and improve perception-information model as a leader’s cognitive style. Moreover, this paper also attempts to inspire researchers to include the cognitive styles in studying the effect of the leaders on TQM focus while implementing it effectively in the organizations.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Mohammad Javad Ershadi, Nafiseh Najafi and Paria Soleimani

Total quality management (TQM) is a part of the total quality assurance perspective. This system, which is considered as a type of managerial philosophy, employs all…

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1256

Abstract

Purpose

Total quality management (TQM) is a part of the total quality assurance perspective. This system, which is considered as a type of managerial philosophy, employs all organizational levels to constantly ameliorate the quality of goods and service. The purpose of this paper is to measure the effect of hard and soft TQM factors on the behavior of customers based on the role of innovation and continuous improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model was extracted from TQM variables in hard and soft parts, customer behavior, innovation and continuous improvement by reviewing the literature and research background. Based on this, a questionnaire was prepared and then, distributed among the statistical population including 374 project managers, quality assurance managers as well as quality control managers by using simple random sampling. All sub-criteria of questionnaire were determined using Delphi technique, to test the research model. Having gathered the questionnaire, the hypotheses were analyzed by using structural equation modeling and AMOS software.

Findings

According to the statistical analyses, TQM has a significant effect on customer behavior through continuous improvement of the quality and innovation. Also, regarding the obtained results, the highest effect was related to the effect of hard TQM factors on customer behavior through innovation as 0.62. Furtheremore, TQM soft factors such as human resource management have significant effect on customer behavior through quality improvement and innovation. Moreover, TQM hard factors are effective on customer behavior through quality improvement and innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was designed and distributed in order to evaluate the hypotheses in this study. One of the primary rationales behind utilizing this method instead of other methods such as interview was high geographical distribution of organizations. Using other moderator variables such as knowledge management, customer knowledge management and customer emotions can be conducted in the future in this area.

Practical implications

Changing the organizational relationships from task orientation to the process orientation, and controlling the organizational performance by measuring process innovations and improvements, while paying attention to the customer satisfaction system are suggested in this paper. These implications should be implemented in construction projects by department of project management office. Furtheremore, providing different communication for receiving the opinions of the customer and imposing them in the product and service, paying attention to the response system and customer complaint, implementation of this process in the organization, and having a process approach for presenting and developing services are the main subjects in this regard.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies on this subject, a structural equation model is used for assessing unobservable latent constructs and their related interrelationship in measuring the impact of TQM factors. Focusing on customer behavior which is a broader domain than customer satisfation through continuous improvement of the quality and innovation is another value of this research.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Benny Lianto, Muhammad Dachyar and Tresna Priyana Soemardi

The purpose of this paper is to identify and screen continuous innovation capability enablers (CICEs) in Indonesia’s manufacturing sectors, develop a relationship among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and screen continuous innovation capability enablers (CICEs) in Indonesia’s manufacturing sectors, develop a relationship among these enablers and determine their driving power and dependence power in the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial CICEs identification process is based on a literature review, while a fuzzy Delphi method (FDM) was used for the screening process of CICEs. Total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) was used to develop contextual relationships among various CICEs. The results of the TISM are used as an input for the matrix of cross-impact multiplications applied to classification (MICMAC) to classify the driving power and dependence powers of the CICEs.

Findings

This paper selected 16 CICEs classified in seven dimensions. TISM results and MICMAC analysis show that leadership, as well as climate and culture, are enablers with the highest driving power and lowest dependence powers; followed by information technology. The results of this study indicate that efforts to continuously develop innovation capabilities in the Indonesian manufacturing industries are strongly influenced by their leadership capability, climate and culture, also information technology-related capability.

Practical implications

The framework assessed in this study provides business managers and policymakers to obtain a bigger picture in developing policies with evidence-based strategy and priority in regard to continuous innovation capability.

Originality/value

The results will be useful for business managers and policymakers to understand the relationship between CICEs and identify key CICEs in Indonesia’s manufacturing sectors, which were previously non-existent.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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