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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Colin Gills

Argues that trainers are, more than ever, being asked to reconcilecorporate agendas with human values. This may mean working in an equalbusiness partnership with line managers and…

421

Abstract

Argues that trainers are, more than ever, being asked to reconcile corporate agendas with human values. This may mean working in an equal business partnership with line managers and fulfilling what amounts to a consultancy role within their operations. Managing the transition from trainer to consultant can be helped by attending external training programmes. Trainers who are adaptable in the climate of change will, therefore, become the survivors.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

Colin Gill, R.S. Morris and Jack Eaton

There is a substantial literature describing the various methods of job evaluation, all of which are essentially concerned to rank different jobs in a pay hierarchy according to…

Abstract

There is a substantial literature describing the various methods of job evaluation, all of which are essentially concerned to rank different jobs in a pay hierarchy according to rational criteria. Also, the aims and effectiveness of job evaluation schemes in terms of labour cost containment and as an aid to economic growth have been extensively discussed and evaluated. Moreover, in an era of incomes policies and the relative decline of industrywide bargaining, commentators have explored the feasibility of national job evaluation or alternative procedures for the consolidation of consistent acceptable differentials or ‘relativities’ between different work groups and industries at the level of the economy.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Robert Conti, Jannis Angelis, Cary Cooper, Brian Faragher and Colin Gill

This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress.

19038

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The Karasek job stress model was used to link shopfloor practices to expected worker stress. The model incorporates the effects of job demands (physical and psychological), job control and social support. The study employs management and worker questionnaires, management interviews and structured plant tours. The response variable is total worker job stress – the sum of the physical and mental stress levels. The independent variable for the first question is the degree of lean implementation at the sites.

Findings

The results are based on 1,391 worker responses at 21 sites in the four UK industry sectors. About 11 tested practices are significantly related to stress and an unexpected non‐linear response of stress to lean implementation is identified. Results indicate that LP is not inherently stressful, with stress levels significantly related to management decisions in designing and operating LP systems.

Practical implications

The hypotheses tests shed light on the relationships between LP practices and job stress, and reveal a significant managerial influence on stress levels. The regression model shows the scale and significant lean practices of this influence, with the work practices explaining 30 percent of job stress variations. The stress reduction and stress control opportunities identified in the study show the potential for designing and operating effective lean systems while also controlling stress levels.

Originality/value

This is the first known multi‐industry empirical study of the relationship of job stress to a range of lean practices and to the degree of lean implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Jannis Angelis, Robert Conti, Cary Cooper and Colin Gill

The characteristics of successful lean operations make a committed workforce a necessity. However, there is an ongoing debate over whether lean characteristics inherently enhance…

7257

Abstract

Purpose

The characteristics of successful lean operations make a committed workforce a necessity. However, there is an ongoing debate over whether lean characteristics inherently enhance or impede commitment. The purpose of this paper is to help settle the debate, as well as provide insights into the role specific work practices play.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on responses from 1,391 workers at 21 lean sites, the authors examined the relationship between the degree of lean implementation and worker commitment; as well as the commitment effects of 21 lean work practices.

Findings

The paper examines relationships between worker commitment and lean production, sheds light on the lean commitment debate and provides guidance for designing lean systems that complement high‐commitment work practices.

Practical implications

The results will be of value to readers with interests in operations, human resources and high‐performance work practices, as well as the management and implementation of lean and its associated practices.

Originality/value

The study described in the paper is unique in that it establishes a statistically valid relationship between lean production and worker commitment and associated work practices.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

345

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16281

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Lynn McAlpine, Gill Turner, Sharon Saunders and Natacha Wilson

This paper aims to examine the experience of gaining research independence by becoming a principal investigator (PI) – an aspiration for many post-PhD researchers about whom…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the experience of gaining research independence by becoming a principal investigator (PI) – an aspiration for many post-PhD researchers about whom little is known. It provides insight into this experience by using a qualitative narrative approach to document how 60 PIs from a range of disciplines in one European and two UK universities experienced working towards and achieving this significant goal.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the context of a semi-structured interview, individuals drew and elaborated a map representing the emotional high and low experiences of the journey from PhD graduation to first PI grant, and completed a biographic questionnaire.

Findings

Regardless of the length of the journey from PhD graduation to first PI grant, more than a third noted the role that luck played in getting the grant. Luck was also perceived to have an influence in other aspects of academic work. This influence made it even more important for these individuals to sustain a belief in themselves and be agentive and persistent in managing the challenges of the journey.

Originality/value

The study, unusual in its cross-national perspective, and its mixed mode data collection, offers a nuanced perspective on the interaction between agency and an environment where the “randomness factor” plays a role in success. The function of luck as a support for sustained agency and resilience is explored.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Katie Barnes, Philip Longfield, Katie Jones, Gill Littlemore, Claire McDonough, Archie McIntyre, Jo Robertson, Neil Turton, Kevin Urdhin and Melanie McLaughlin

The purpose of this paper is to show how the new arrangements for commissioning services in the English NHS can facilitate innovations in service delivery leading to improvements…

533

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the new arrangements for commissioning services in the English NHS can facilitate innovations in service delivery leading to improvements in outcomes and cost effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses cost modelling based upon the Hospital Episodes Statistics compiled by the NHS Information Centre to calculate recent expenditure upon treatment of routine childhood illnesses managed as short stay hospital admissions, and then uses a case study of a children's walk‐in centre to show how an alternative service can be provided, and a new service embedded in general practice to show a further alternative type of provision.

Findings

The study finds that large sums are currently being spent on inappropriate treatment of routine childhood conditions, especially in large urban conurbations. It demonstrates that in the case studies, the alternative provision can provide a viable and effective alternative.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based upon historical data by necessity. The new commissioning groups are not co‐located with the historical PCTs on which this study is based. The data are collected by providers and co‐ordinated by the NHS Information Centre. Therefore the investigators do not have control over the data quality. The second case study is a new service and therefore is used as an illustration of other service types.

Practical implications

This study suggests that paediatric ambulatory services can be provided at lower cost with better outcomes.

Social implications

This study provides the basis for a pilot study in Salford, where additional social benefits are targeted including better school attendance and increased self‐awareness over child health amongst local families.

Originality/value

The study provides quantitative evidence for commissioning alternative paediatric ambulatory services.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Jameson Gill

The purpose of this paper is to describe the difficulties encountered by researchers who are looking to operationalise theoretical memetics and provide a methodological avenue for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the difficulties encountered by researchers who are looking to operationalise theoretical memetics and provide a methodological avenue for studies that can test meme theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The application of evolutionary theory to organisations is reviewed by critically reflecting on the validity of its truth claims. To focus the discussion a number of applications of meme theory are reviewed to raise specific issues which ought to be the subject of empirical investigation. Subsequently, the empirical studies conducted to date are assessed in terms of the progress made and conclusions for further work are drawn.

Findings

The paper finds that the key questions posed by memetic theory have yet to be addressed empirically and that a recurring weakness is the practice of assuming the existence of a replicating unit of culture which has, however, yet to be demonstrated as a valid concept. Therefore, an “extra‐memetic” methodology is deemed to be necessary for the development of memetics as a scientific endeavour. Narrative analysis is abducted as an appropriate avenue for the operationalisation of extra‐memetic empirical research.

Originality/value

The paper highlights inconsistencies, embedded in much of the memetic literature, which have not previously been recognised and the colloquial nature of the discipline is challenged from a positive but critical perspective. Consequently, the paper develops a rationale for the adoption of a widely recognised social science methodology for memetics which has been absent to date. In proposing narrative orientated research, knowledge concerning memes' validity can be facilitated whilst avoiding the current circularity in memetic truth claims.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Colin Dale and Deborah Moore

458

Abstract

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

1 – 10 of 118