Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Satyanarayana Parayitam and Chris Papenhausen

This paper aims to investigate the effect of cooperative conflict management on agreement-seeking behavior, agreement-seeking behavior on decision outcomes, moderating…

Downloads
2335

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of cooperative conflict management on agreement-seeking behavior, agreement-seeking behavior on decision outcomes, moderating role of competence-based trust on the relationship between agreement-seeking behavior and decision outcomes, and mediating role of agreement-seeking behavior between cooperative conflict management and decision outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 348 students enrolled in a strategic management capstone course that features strategic decision-making in a simulated business strategy game. The data from 94 teams were collected from the student population using a carefully administered instrument. The data were aggregated after running the inter-rater agreement test and the analyzed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results from the hierarchical regression of the complex moderated mediation model reveal that cooperative conflict management is positively related to agreement-seeking behavior, and agreement-seeking behavior mediates the relationship between cooperative conflict management and decision outcomes. The results also suggest that competence-based trust acts as a moderator in the relationship between agreement-seeking behavior and decision quality; agreement-seeking behavior and team effectiveness, and agreement-seeking behavior and decision commitment. Results also support mediation of agreement-seeking behavior between cooperative conflict management and decision outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is based on self-report measures, and hence, the limitations of social desirability bias and common method bias are inherent. However, adequate care is taken to minimize these limitations. The research has implications for the strategic decision-making process literature.

Practical implications

In addition to the strategic management literature, this study contributes to practicing managers. The study suggests that competence-based trust plays a vital role in decision effectiveness. Administrators need to select the members in the decision-making process who have competence-based trust on one another and engage in agreement-seeking behavior.

Social implications

The findings from the study help in creating a fruitful social environment in organizations.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights about the previously unknown effects of cooperative conflict management and agreement-seeking behavior in strategic decision-making process.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Satyanarayana Parayitam and Chris Papenhausen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of three important group process variables, namely, agreement-seeking behavior, group trust, and cognitive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of three important group process variables, namely, agreement-seeking behavior, group trust, and cognitive diversity, on decision outcomes. In addition, it seeks to examine the role of process conflict as a moderator in the relationship between agreement-seeking behavior and team effectiveness; agreement-seeking behavior and decision commitment; cognitive diversity and team effectiveness; and cognitive diversity and decision commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 160 students enrolled in a strategic management capstone course that features strategic decision making in a simulated business strategy game. The data from 41 teams were collected from the student population using a carefully administered instrument, and the data were aggregated only after appropriate inter-rater agreement tests were run.

Findings

Results show that the group process variables are positively related to decision outcomes. The data support the view that process conflict acts as a moderator in the relationship between agreement-seeking behavior and team effectiveness and decision commitment. Further, the results support that cognitive diversity has a positive impact on decision commitment and team effectiveness. Process conflict, which acts as a deterrent, is outweighed by the presence of agreement-seeking behavior.

Research limitations/implications

Since the present research is based on self-report measures, the limitations of social desirability bias and common method bias are inherent. However, sufficient care is taken to minimize these limitations. The research has implications for both the conflict management and strategic decision-making process literatures.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both practicing managers and the strategic management literature. The study suggests that administrators should select those teams who are prone to agreement-seeking behavior; and team members who trust one another. Administrators need not unduly avoid process conflict because diversity in opinions and thinking and agreement-seeking behavior outweigh the negative effects of process conflict.

Social implications

The findings from the study will be useful for creating congenial social environment in the organizations.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights about the previously unknown effects of process conflict in strategic decision-making process.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Chris Papenhausen

Previous research has shown that eras of managerial rhetorics have alternated between normative and rational ideologies. The purpose of this study is to test the influence…

Downloads
399

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that eras of managerial rhetorics have alternated between normative and rational ideologies. The purpose of this study is to test the influence of generational membership on this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Examining data for the past 130 years, eras of managerial rhetorics are matched with recurring generational archetypes.

Findings

Empirical evidence is analyzed and found to be generally supportive of the hypotheses: generational membership is associated with the timing of the alternation in managerial rhetorics.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of association suggest generational change could be a causal driver of long‐term change in managerial rhetorics.

Practical implications

The model tested implies a predictive ability to anticipate the movement from the current normative rhetoric to a new rational rhetoric in the near future.

Originality/value

This study is the first to find evidence that the alternation between rational and normative managerial rhetorics is related to generational effects.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Chris Papenhausen

Previous research on institutional change has largely ignored its cyclical nature. This paper aims to introduce a four‐phase cyclical model of long‐term institutional change.

Downloads
1098

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research on institutional change has largely ignored its cyclical nature. This paper aims to introduce a four‐phase cyclical model of long‐term institutional change.

Design/methodology/approach

The recurrent patterns of the model have been identified from previous technological revolutions and their accompanying surges of development. The model also incorporates generational theory as a driver of institutional change.

Findings

The model predicts that a multi‐year institutional crisis is currently underway that has important implications for practitioners. The paper also describes proposed solutions to the current crisis.

Originality/value

The model developed synthesizes disparate institutional theories to build a new explanation for long‐term economic development.

Details

Foresight, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Chris Papenhausen and Walter Einstein

The purpose of this paper is to show how the Balanced Scorecard approach, a performance management system, could be implemented at a college of business.

Downloads
7498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the Balanced Scorecard approach, a performance management system, could be implemented at a college of business.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' own college of business is used as an example, to present how a successful Balanced Scorecard would look.

Practical implications

A comprehensive guide for implementation of the Balanced Scorecard approach is presented, including presentation of specific objectives and measures appropriate for a college of business.

Originality/value

The paper points out that the Balanced Scorecard approach is well suited to a higher education situation and allows the alignment of a wide variety of measures with the unique mission and strategy of a college of business.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5