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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Angela DosAlmas and Catherine Lewis

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Christine Healey, Catherine Mills, Vikki Fahey, Cathy Hyde‐Price, Jinesh Shah and Peter Kinderman

The New Ways of Working (NWW) initiative was launched in 2004 to build a more flexible and skilled mental health workforce. This paper explores the journey through inpatient care…

Abstract

The New Ways of Working (NWW) initiative was launched in 2004 to build a more flexible and skilled mental health workforce. This paper explores the journey through inpatient care under a new acute care team (ACT) model, piloted in Mersey Care NHS Trust as part of the redesign of services under the NWW. Fourteen service users were interviewed face‐to‐face, using an interview schedule of open‐ended questions administered by service user and carer interviewers. Service user perspectives on the admission process and inpatient care were reported as predominantly negative. Service user perspectives on the discharge process and aftercare were reported as predominantly positive. The need for clear and unambiguous care pathways, adequate information, good communication, and to have continuity of care and positive relationships with staff emerged as key themes.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2011

Tony Ryan, Gayatri Nambiar‐Greenwood, Carol Haigh and Catherine Mills

The search for alternatives to inpatient mental health care in the UK and further afield has been going on over the last few decades of the previous century. Amongst the range of…

546

Abstract

Purpose

The search for alternatives to inpatient mental health care in the UK and further afield has been going on over the last few decades of the previous century. Amongst the range of alternatives that have been developed are community‐based mental health crisis houses that seek to work with people, who may otherwise have been admitted to hospital. Amethyst House is a four‐bed mental health crisis house based in inner city Liverpool and works solely with the local Crisis Resolution Home Treatment Team (CRHTT) to work with people who require support that could not be delivered at home. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of one element of a service evaluation: the effectiveness of the service in relation to the mental health needs of people admitted.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the service model, which integrates the crisis house and the CRHTT, with the latter acting as gatekeepers to the service.

Findings

Findings showed improvements in mental health symptomatology and disabilities associated with the crisis between admission and discharge from the service.

Originality/value

The paper describes the profile of the people who used the service over a six‐month period in 2009, their care pathways through the service and their clinical outcomes between admission and discharge.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Katharine D'Souza, Erika Hawkes and Catherine Mills

The purpose of this paper is to highlight developments in evaluation of researcher development training undertaken by the University of Birmingham's Graduate School. It details…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight developments in evaluation of researcher development training undertaken by the University of Birmingham's Graduate School. It details the mixed methods analysis techniques applied and shows how results are used to shape future training provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Initial analysis is carried out immediately following each course to ensure it meets the needs of current students. Deeper analysis is undertaken on an annual basis to draw out trends and issues. This allows us to see overall satisfaction with each course as well as identifying the most helpful elements, what could be changed, and what other courses students would like to see. As a case study this paper demonstrates the quantitative and qualitative evaluation undertaken on the Academic Writing, Part Time Researcher and Viva Preparation courses run in recent years and shows how the results can be measured using the Rugby Team Impact Framework.

Findings

Analysis of our courses has revealed conclusions which will steer future course development and demonstrates the value of researcher development training.

Practical implications

Our results give us confidence that our training programme delivers what our students need.

Originality/value

These methods could be applied to researcher development training programmes elsewhere.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Catherine Mill and Holly Yu

96

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Özlem Duva Kaya

The pandemic entering our lives globally challenges us to think about questions related to the cities and new forms of social life as the cities are never seen last any longer…

Abstract

The pandemic entering our lives globally challenges us to think about questions related to the cities and new forms of social life as the cities are never seen last any longer without a crisis. There have been various debates among philosophers on this issue. Some philosophers reject the new administration policies by claiming that the ‘physical distance’ required for health has been used for power under the name of ‘social distance’ with the custody of the street and point out that these policies have created new forms of control, among economically, politically, and socially. Some others are more hopeful and believe that the crisis can build a new economic and social life; it can be an opportunity to find a new starting point; especially from being confined in the pandemic process. The author will refer to Agamben’s thoughts to understand how the state of exception turned into a rule and how it affects street politics. In this context, COVID-19 is seen as a ‘state of exception’ that normalises all the dominative practices, strengthens sovereignty by designing the social/economical life like a camp. In the pandemic process, people were accustomed to isolation by the administrations under the name of social distance, just like in a camp life. At this point, Agamben’s analysis should be understood in relation to a biopolitical paradigm and can be expanded to reflect on street economy, street politics, and the life of cities.

Details

A New Social Street Economy: An Effect of The COVID-19 Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-124-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Britta Woldering

99

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Henry Etzkowitz

This paper aims to investigate knowledge‐capital relationship through tracking the history of knowledge commercialization.

493

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate knowledge‐capital relationship through tracking the history of knowledge commercialization.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical exploration, historical evidence and interviews are used in this research. Firstly it recalls the convergence of academic knowledge and industrial capital. Then the knowledge‐capital marriage is observed. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of the marriage on future enterprise development.

Findings

The combination of knowledge and capital is inevitable; the knowledge‐capital marriage is the origin of contemporary academic enterprise; the future enterprise will more rely on knowledge‐capital combination.

Originality/value

This study is helpful to policymaking: to promote the combination of knowledge and capital in less developed countries or regions, achieving knowledge‐capital interaction in innovation system.

Details

Journal of Knowledge-based Innovation in China, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Dene Hurley and Amod Choudhary

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of chief financial officers’ (CFOs’) gender in financial risk taking of 58 US companies along with the impact of having women…

2001

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of chief financial officers’ (CFOs’) gender in financial risk taking of 58 US companies along with the impact of having women board members.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a panel data of 58 selected S&P 500 companies during the period 2012-2016, this paper determines whether the gender of CFOs and having women board members play a role in risk-taking behavior of firms.

Findings

Firms led by female CFOs are smaller in size with lower net income and net revenue. The panel data analysis shows that the impact of female CFOs on firms’ financial risk is mixed, depending on risk measures used, whereas increasing female board members reduces that risk.

Research limitations/implications

The data used is limited to 58 S&P 500 companies, and two of the three risk-taking measures used in the study, specifically investment in property, plant and equipment (PPE) and debt/equity ratio, may not be applicable to some industries.

Practical implications

The findings provide mixed evidence of risk aversion by females in executive and leadership positions, depending on the measures used and the management responsibilities they undertake (CFO versus board member) with support for the glass cliff phenomenon in which females may be leading financially precarious organizations.

Social implications

Female CFOs are found to be leading relatively smaller and financially poor-performing firms compared with the male CFO-led firms, thereby giving support to the glass cliff arguments.

Originality/value

The paper examines the role of CFOs’ gender and board diversity in risk taking as measured by the investment in PPE, debt/equity ratio and stock return volatility.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Catherine Lewis

211

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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