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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Ian Hesketh and Cary Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to deepen conceptual understanding of how employee wellbeing is identified and categorised in the workplace, and how management information is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen conceptual understanding of how employee wellbeing is identified and categorised in the workplace, and how management information is used to target workplace interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper reviewing and discussing contemporary literature and practice, with a focus on themes congruent with employee needs and organisational intervention options in relation to wellbeing. This paper considers wellbeing in the context of police work in the UK, and how a framework can help those charged with leading to understand and act in the interest of both the employee and the organisation.

Findings

This paper suggests that the use of an appropriate strategic HR model, such as the General Analysis, Interventions and Needs (GAIN) pyramid (Hesketh and Rhodes, 2015), can assist organisations to develop practical categories and metrics to illustrate employee status in relation to wellbeing.

Practical implications

The arguments posed provide opportunities for practitioners to use workforce-modelling tools that assist in identifying, categorising and targeting wellbeing interventions in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper highlights that identifying, categorising and prioritising wellbeing interventions in the workplace has hitherto received little academic attention. This paper contributes by providing a greater practical insight into what may work, which is important for leaders in all organisations, particularly those trying to maintain operational performance whilst undergoing programmes of change.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Jean-Francois Stich, Monideepa Tarafdar, Patrick Stacey and Cary L. Cooper

Using e-mail is a time-consuming activity that can increase workload stress. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the individual’s e-mail…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using e-mail is a time-consuming activity that can increase workload stress. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the individual’s e-mail load, workload stress and desired e-mail load, drawing from the cybernetic theory of stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on prior theory, the authors first hypothesized relationships among e-mail load, workplace stress and desired e-mail load. The authors then tested these relationships on a sample of 504 full-time workers in the USA, using survey data and covariance-based structural equation modeling techniques.

Findings

The authors find that higher e-mail load is associated with higher workload stress; higher workload stress is associated with lower desired e-mail load; lower desired e-mail load is associated with lower e-mail load; and higher workload stress is associated with higher psychological strain, higher negative emotions and lower organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The study provides a novel understanding of workload stress due to e-mail load, through the lens of cybernetic theory. It contributes to the e-mail overload and technostress literatures by conceptualizing desired e-mail load as a potential outcome of workplace stress and as a regulator for e-mail load. For practitioners, the study highlights the importance of managing employees’ e-mail load to prevent the negative effects of workplace stress and associated strains.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2018

Jean-François Stich, Monideepa Tarafdar and Cary L. Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to review technostress-related challenges arising out of workplace communication, for employees and organizations, and to provide suggestions…

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1995

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review technostress-related challenges arising out of workplace communication, for employees and organizations, and to provide suggestions for taking these challenges on.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of current research and practice in the area of technostress-related challenges workplace communication.

Findings

Employees face technostress challenges relating to workplace communication in the form of technology overload, interruptions and work-home interferences. Organizations have to strike a balance between giving employees the technology they want and protecting them from these challenges. Several interventions to strike such balance are reviewed and commented on.

Practical implications

The paper gives practitioners an accessible overview of current research and practice in the area of technostress from workplace communication such as e-mail. A number of practical interventions are reviewed and commented on, which could help employees tackle such challenges.

Originality/value

Although this paper reviews state-of-the-art research, it is written in an accessible and practitioner-oriented style, which should be found valuable by readers with limited time but urgency to deal with technostress challenges arising out of workplace communication.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Vijay Pereira, Cary L. Cooper, Rajesh Chandwani, Arup Varma and Shlomo Yedidia Y. Tarba

Abstract

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Ahmad Arslan, Cary Cooper, Zaheer Khan, Ismail Golgeci and Imran Ali

This paper aims to specifically focus on the challenges that human resource management (HRM) leaders and departments in contemporary organisations face due to close…

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1986

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to specifically focus on the challenges that human resource management (HRM) leaders and departments in contemporary organisations face due to close interaction between artificial intelligence (AI) (primarily robots) and human workers especially at the team level. It further discusses important potential strategies, which can be useful to overcome these challenges based on a conceptual review of extant research.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper undertakes a conceptual work where multiple streams of literature are integrated to present a rather holistic yet critical overview of the relationship between AI (particularly robots) and HRM in contemporary organisations.

Findings

We highlight that interaction and collaboration between human workers and robots is visible in a range of industries and organisational functions, where both are working as team members. This gives rise to unique challenges for HRM function in contemporary organisations where they need to address workers' fear of working with AI, especially in relation to future job loss and difficult dynamics associated with building trust between human workers and AI-enabled robots as team members. Along with these, human workers' task fulfilment expectations with their AI-enabled robot colleagues need to be carefully communicated and managed by HRM staff to maintain the collaborative spirit, as well as future performance evaluations of employees. The authors found that organisational support mechanisms such as facilitating environment, training opportunities and ensuring a viable technological competence level before organising human workers in teams with robots are important. Finally, we found that one of the toughest challenges for HRM relates to performance evaluation in teams where both humans and AI (including robots) work side by side. We referred to the lack of existing frameworks to guide HRM managers in this concern and stressed the possibility of taking insights from the computer gaming literature, where performance evaluation models have been developed to analyse humans and AI interactions while keeping the context and limitations of both in view.

Originality/value

Our paper is one of the few studies that go beyond a rather general or functional analysis of AI in the HRM context. It specifically focusses on the teamwork dimension, where human workers and AI-powered machines (robots) work together and offer insights and suggestions for such teams' smooth functioning.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Ahmad Arslan, Ismail Golgeci, Lauri Haapanen, Shlomo Tarba, Cary Cooper and William Y. Degbey

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of legitimacy in internationalization to Africa of a Finnish professional service microfirm, which uses cause-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of legitimacy in internationalization to Africa of a Finnish professional service microfirm, which uses cause-related marketing (CRM) as the business model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper consists of a single case study of a microfirm (two employees) originating from Finland, which has successfully internationalized to many African countries. Due to the uniqueness of the context, the authors use semi-structured interviews to collect founders’ insights to the issue being addressed. Moreover, along with interviews, secondary sources related to football talent scouting in Africa are also utilized in the paper.

Findings

The authors found that the case company was established with the aim of helping and uplifting poor African footballers, so the business model is CRM. It has scouted many of them for professional football clubs in Europe. The authors further found that sociopolitical legitimacy plays a major role in dealing with African footballers and local stakeholders, while cognitive legitimacy helped the case firm gain the trust of European football clubs.

Originality/value

Internationalization of microfirms operating in the service sector is a rather under-researched area compared to the internationalization of SMEs and large MNEs. The paper is one of the first to study internationalization of a professional service microfirm involved in scouting football talent in Africa and matchmaking them with European football clubs. It contributes to extant CRM and internationalization literature by being one of the first to analyze a firm whose business model revolves around CRM and discussing specific roles of different kinds of legitimacies needed for internationalization to Africa in this specific service sector.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

KEN NIXON

The first article on the subject, which appeared in the August issue of Industrial and Commercial Training, described the development of a training course in BEA for…

Abstract

The first article on the subject, which appeared in the August issue of Industrial and Commercial Training, described the development of a training course in BEA for Passenger Services Staff. The aim of this training is to improve personal service. Its most important element is role‐playing of typical interactions between staff and passengers; these are recorded on video‐tape and replayed for viewing and discussion. A good deal of reading, thinking and research was done before and during the training development. Visits were made to the training centres of several airlines, in Britain and the USA; research workers in both countries were also consulted. Five relevant views of the subject will be examined. These are: • the concept of social skill — Michael Argyle • the analysis of verbal behaviours — Neil Rackham • T‐group training — particularly the research by Cary Cooper and Henry Odie for the Hotel and Catering ITB • transactional analysis — work in Pan American Airways and American Airlines • applied learning in management training — by Mel Sorcher and Arnold Goldstein of Syracuse, USA A reading list giving references to these ideas and authors is given at the end of the article. The intention here is briefly to describe these views, evaluate their relevance to Customer Service Training generally, and show how they have influenced the philosophy and the design of the BEA training. Naturally, more weight will be given to one view than to another in the analysis that follows, but it should be emphasised that there is no intention to choose nor to reject any particular theory or training development. The different approaches are often complementary, each provides insight into the problems of human interaction.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Ben Moss

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Abstract

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Cary Cooper

Cary Cooper, CBE, is Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Lancaster University and Director of Robertson Cooper Limited. Formerly he was the BUPA Professor…

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732

Abstract

Cary Cooper, CBE, is Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Lancaster University and Director of Robertson Cooper Limited. Formerly he was the BUPA Professor of Organizational Psychology at UMIST. He is a Chartered Occupational Psychologist and a Fellow of the British Psychological Society. He is widely acknowledged as a world leading authority on workplace stress. He is the author of an extensive and diverse range of over 300 publications. Here he answers questions about his work.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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