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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Jeannine Therese Moreau and Trudy Rudge

This paper examines how certain care values permeate, legitimize and authorize hospitalized-older-adults’ care, technologies and practices. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how certain care values permeate, legitimize and authorize hospitalized-older-adults’ care, technologies and practices. The purpose of this paper is to expose how values are not benign but operate discursively establishing “orders of worth” with significant effect on the ethics of the care-setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from a discursive ethnography to see “up close” on a surgical unit how values influence nurse/older-adult-patient care occasions in the domain of older-adults and functional decline. Data are from participant observations, conversations, interviews, chart reviews and reviewed literature. Foucauldian discursive analytics rendered values recognizable and analyzable as discursive practices. Discourse is a social practice of knowledge production constituting and giving meaning to what it represents.

Findings

Analysis reveals how care values inhere discourses like measurement, efficiency, economics, risk and functional decline (loss of capacity for independent living) pervading care technologies and practices, subjugating older adults’ bodies to techniques, turning older persons into measurable objects of knowledge. These values determine social conditions of worth, objectifying, calculating, normalizing and homogenizing what it means to be old, ill and in hospital.

Originality/value

Seven older adult patients and attendant nurses were followed for their entire hospitalization. The ethnography renders visible how care values as discursive practices rationalize the social order and operations of everyday care. Analytic outcomes offer insights of how dominant care values enabled care technologies and practices to govern hospitalized-older-adults as a population to be ordered, managed and controlled, eliding possibilities of engaging humanistic patient-centered care.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Karin Hedström

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the values of IT in elderly care.

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1396

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the values of IT in elderly care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an empirical investigation based on four in‐depth case studies concerning IT in elderly care. The study draws on Actor‐Network Theory (ANT) and Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) with a focus on different actor groups' sense‐making regarding the role of IT in elderly care. The empirical analysis is, however, influenced by Grounded Theory (GT). Values are studied through the concept of “value areas”, which is a categorization of various actor groups' anticipated and experienced effects of developing, implementing, and using IT in elderly care.

Findings

The paper finds that the values of IT in elderly care can be organized in four related value areas: administration values, integration values, care values, and professional values. Research limitations/implications – Although the findings in this paper are related to elderly care it is believed that the value areas could be valid for all kinds of care work. Practical implications – The paper illustrates how different values are present during the development of IT, and discusses the importance of not only including, but also permitting, various actor groups' interests and values to influence the design process.

Originality/value

This paper examines the value of IT in elderly care, as well as presenting an approach for analyzing the values of IT. The paper and its findings should be valid for researchers, as well as for practitioners.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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How to Deliver Integrated Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-530-1

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Kalle Kraus

This paper aims to explore the effects of the increased influence of accounting on core values and practices within the services providing home care in Sweden – a public…

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1277

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of the increased influence of accounting on core values and practices within the services providing home care in Sweden – a public sector setting involving inter‐organisational cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study data were obtained primarily through semi‐structured interviews with managers and front‐line staff involved in home care.

Findings

When accountingisation is extended to include inter‐organisational cooperation, a form of heterogeneous accountingisation occurred in the home care services: an internal domain (with a low level of accountingisation) could be differentiated from an inter‐organisational domain (with a high level of accountingisation). When the accounting‐induced disturbances intensified, there was a redefinition of core values. In the internal domain, core values of pensioner‐oriented focus and flexibility during service delivery persisted. In contrast, in the inter‐organisational domain, core values had the legal boundaries of the organisation as their central foundation, standardisation was emphasised, and inter‐organisational work practices were defined as the other organisation's responsibility. The findings also extend the research on absorption groups by indicating the rise of a new type of absorption process. Absorption was not undertaken by a few individuals, specialist work groups or satellite organisations, as described in the literature; instead, all front‐line welfare professionals were involved in absorbing the accounting‐induced disturbances when performing their tasks.

Research limitations/implications

This case study research is context‐specific and the meaning and consequences of accountingisation may differ within the public sector because of the status and strength of professional groups concerned.

Originality/value

To date, research on accountingisation has primarily employed an intra‐organisational perspective. This paper analyses accountingisation in an inter‐organisational setting.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Steve Moore

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the findings from an empirical, mixed methods research project that reveal the importance of the personal value frameworks…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the findings from an empirical, mixed methods research project that reveal the importance of the personal value frameworks held by individual staff in the prevention of abuse of older people in private sector care homes.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 36 care home personnel, including proprietors, care managers and care staff.

Findings

A significant number of respondents identified the importance of personal value frameworks among staff providing care as a potential contributory factor in the prevention of abuse of older people.

Research limitations/implications

Though the research draws upon the experiences of only 36 care home personnel through interviews, data suggest that the personal evaluations of staff towards those in their care is a significant contributory factor to the occurrence of abuse.

Originality/value

The research has identified individual staff value frameworks as a causal factor in the occurrence of abuse. The research also confirms that the perceptions of “values” among respondents directly involved in the provision of care are at odds with common understanding of “values” often cited elsewhere in connection with staff recruitment and training as a means of preventing the occurrence of abuse.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Jeppe Oute and Trudy Rudge

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Maria Andersson Marchesoni, Karin Axelsson and Inger Lindberg

– The purpose of this paper is to describe staffs’ perceptions of digital support for medication administration (DSM) and out of the perceptions interpret underlying values.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe staffs’ perceptions of digital support for medication administration (DSM) and out of the perceptions interpret underlying values.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 22 persons working in elder care participated in the study. The study had a qualitative approach and focus group interviews were used to collect data. To analyze the manifest content a phenomenographic method was used. An interpretation of perceptions was then undertaken aimed at identifying underlying values.

Findings

Three descriptive categories, “utility,” “impact on working environment” and “economic impact” were the result of the manifest analysis. The values of having a “good working environment,” “benefits” and “good economy” were interpreted as guidance for staffs’ acceptance or rejection of the DSM.

Social implications

The care-giving process and its challenges from the perspective of the staffs need consideration. Staffs in this study sometimes expressed strong emotions as a sign of frustration for losing prerequisites to perform their work well. In big complex organizations where economy and effectiveness are often discussed, knowledge of power relations in innovation and implementation processes would be beneficial. Although moral distress is a well-known phenomenon, future research may be needed to find solutions that diminish this negative trend in more economic focussed organizations.

Originality/value

This study had a twofold approach with the intention of going beyond descriptions. To gain a deeper understanding a normative interpretation was completed. Ethical conflicts are frequently characterized as conflicts between at least two values. In this study staffs expressed fear of losing prerequisites needed to perform their work well. Prerequisites that were identified as values and these values were threatened by the DSM.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Elaine M. Gallagher and Gerald Hodge

Within the context of health care reform and its evaluation, a major gap exists in relation to our understanding of the values which seniors hold regarding their health…

Abstract

Within the context of health care reform and its evaluation, a major gap exists in relation to our understanding of the values which seniors hold regarding their health care. This paper reports on a modified participatory, ethnographic study of such values, using transcribed interviews with ten seniors from across Canada. Members of the National Advisory Council of Canada, most of whom are themselves seniors, participated in designing the study, carrying out the interviews and interpreting the results. Clusters of values were identified concerning health care services, service providers and the overall health care system. While the numbers involved in this study preclude generalizing to the population, a number of recommendations emerged from the study which could impact on future research and begin to influence health policy at local and national levels.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Riya Elizabeth George, Nisha Dogra and Bill Fulford

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and…

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4488

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate further questions for debate in this area; leading to a proposal of an alternative approach to educating mental-health professionals on values and ethics.

Originality/value

In current mental-health care settings, very few professionals work with homogeneous populations. It is imperative that mental-health education and training ensures health professionals are competent to practice in diverse settings; where ethics and values are bound to differ. Establishing professional practice not only involves considering concepts such as values and ethics, but also equality, diversity and culture. Incorporating values-based practice and cultural diversity training holds promise to education and training, that is truly reflective of the complexity of clinical decision making in mental-health. Further research is needed as to how these two frameworks can be unified and taught.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2018

Melanie Formentin and Denise Bortree

The purpose of this paper is to examine philanthropic partnerships between donor organizations and nonprofits and how ethics of care may play an important role in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine philanthropic partnerships between donor organizations and nonprofits and how ethics of care may play an important role in the quality of relationship between the partners.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 29 in-depth interviews were conducted with communications professionals at nonprofit organizations to understand how their partnerships with national sport organizations benefited their organizations and how characteristics of the sport organizations’ communication and behavior have consequence for their partners.

Findings

The four dimensions of ethics of care (building trust, showing mutual concern, promoting human flourishing and responsiveness to needs) clearly emerged as the most beneficial ways sport organizations engage with their nonprofit partners.

Research limitations/implications

This study introduces the concept of ethic of care into the CSR literature and suggests that ethics of care may play an important role in relationship management with key publics.

Practical implications

Practically, this study offers insights for corporate partners about the way their communication and behavior influence nonprofits, and it suggests ways that corporations can improve their work with partners to create a more productive relationship.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to use ethics of care to examine the relationship of CSR partnerships and the first to conduct a study with sport organizations.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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