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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Dhitiporn Chompookum and C. Brooklyn Derr

When the labor market becomes tighter and the economy is uncertain, companies often respond by downsizing and by asking those employees who remain to be more productive and…

4581

Abstract

When the labor market becomes tighter and the economy is uncertain, companies often respond by downsizing and by asking those employees who remain to be more productive and dependable. It is, therefore, of interest to both managers and researchers to better understand the dynamics of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). OCB is defined as one's willingness to do more than required, to go the extra mile. This study explores how one's subjective sense of career orientation (the internal career) affects OCB. The research was conducted in eight medium‐to‐large organizations in Thailand and it was discovered, as predicted, that internal career orientations impact the level of OCB. This finding is important because other research shows that the relationship between dispositional variables and OCB is inconclusive.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Michael Simmons

Questioning traditional male values at work began in the women's movement. But as books like C. Brooklyn Derr's Managing the New Careerists (reviewed on p253) show, men themselves…

Abstract

Questioning traditional male values at work began in the women's movement. But as books like C. Brooklyn Derr's Managing the New Careerists (reviewed on p253) show, men themselves are now questioning their roles at work and reassessing the relative importance of the various facets which make up their lives.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Dianne Sundby and C. Brooklyn Derr

The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective of the career life of Michael Driver, from the time of his Princeton graduate studies and early faculty years at Purdue…

1163

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective of the career life of Michael Driver, from the time of his Princeton graduate studies and early faculty years at Purdue University through the over three decades he spent at USC.

Design/methodology/approach

The history and development of his theoretical and research interests are presented, as well as the many contributions he made to both management consulting and the education of MBA students. His 1970s role in the founding and development of the Careers Division of the Academy of Management and his contributions to career research are highlighted and illuminate one of the critical periods in the renewal of the field. His orientation towards complexity and integration stand out as characteristics that positively impact theory building and research.

Findings

Michael Driver's career life was one of depth, scope, growth, and continuity. As a humanist, he would want us to not only continue our pursuits to better understand the complexities of human behavior, but to integrate them into something more meaningful.

Originality/value

This retrospective provides insight into the history and development of Mike Driver's theoretical and research interests and underscores his many contributions. The essay also highlights the history of career studies during the renewal period of the 1970s and 1980s. Hopefully, Mike Driver's legacy will inspire younger scholars to extend the field and carry it forward.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management,the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of theengineer is reviewed and his/her possible…

7790

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of the engineer is reviewed and his/her possible present role in management is considered. Management objectives are outlined and defined and the specific role of the engineer emphasised. The best managers are leaders, in particular effective leaders of teams, and this is a management task well within the grasp of the engineer. The engineer′s specific training and initial experience give him/her special qualifications in this area. Indeed, there seems to be no reason why the engineer should not climb the management ladder right to the top, especially these days when technology is continually growing in importance. The demands made on the effective chief executive are outlined. It would seem that engineering management has come of age and that with the appropriate management training the engineer should be well capable of filling a senior management role.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Norma D’Annunzio‐Green

Human resource management (HRM) policies in international organizations with wide geographic distribution and operating in high numbers of different cultural environments must be…

6894

Abstract

Human resource management (HRM) policies in international organizations with wide geographic distribution and operating in high numbers of different cultural environments must be underpinned with a strong international management development (IMD) programme. Uses an exploratory, case‐study approach to show the ways in which several different international organizations are dealing with current situations and their perceived future needs. Describes how IMD is seen to be a comprehensive approach covering selection, training and career support, and how international recruitment is becoming a much more important feature, with the expatriate model of management fading. Explains the extent to which companies have faced adapting to the new conditions and suggests organizations should think longer‐term and more holistically when designing these systems.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

DEIRDRE J. DUNCAN and J.W. PEACH

The research reported in this article involved a structural change in a Canadian High School. The change resulted in the transfer of control over the budget from the school…

Abstract

The research reported in this article involved a structural change in a Canadian High School. The change resulted in the transfer of control over the budget from the school division to the school staff. It was judged to have been successful and this was attributed to a number of factors: (i) the change occurred when the school's environment was receptive to new ideas and new organizational patterns; (ii) there had been changes in education at the Provincial level; (iii) there was some dissatisfaction with the existing system at the school and the new system reduced this dissatisfaction; (iv) personnel in the school had the support of officials superordinate to them in the school division; (v) the Principal had a sound knowledge of the change agent's role; (vi) the school's staff was involved in planning and implementing the change and each member had a clearly defined role to play; (vii) the Principal was able to maintain the school's newly established control at the school level. In this article these reasons are analyzed and comparisons are made between the findings from this research and those of related studies.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Joanie Caron, Hugo Asselin, Jean-Michel Beaudoin and Doïna Muresanu

While companies in developed countries are increasingly turning to indigenous employees, integration measures have met with mixed results. Low integration can lead to breach of…

5262

Abstract

Purpose

While companies in developed countries are increasingly turning to indigenous employees, integration measures have met with mixed results. Low integration can lead to breach of the psychological contract, i.e. perceived mutual obligations between employee and employer. The purpose of this paper is to identify how leadership and organizational integration measures can be implemented to promote the perceived insider status (PIS) of indigenous employees, thereby fostering fulfillment of the psychological contract.

Design/methodology/approach

A search for relevant literature yielded 128 texts used to identify integration measures at the level of employee–supervisor relationships (leader-member exchanges, inclusive leadership) and at the level of employee–organization relationships (perceived organizational support, pro-diversity practices).

Findings

Measures related to leadership included recruiting qualified leaders, understanding cultural particularities, integrating diverse contributions and welcoming questions and challenges. Organizational measures included reaching a critical mass of indigenous employees, promoting equity and participation, developing skills, assigning meaningful tasks, maintaining good work relationships, facilitating work-life balance, providing employment security, fostering support from communities and monitoring practices.

Originality/value

While PIS has been studied in western and culturally diverse contexts, it has received less attention in indigenous contexts. Yet, some indigenous cultural values are incompatible with the basic assumptions of mainstream theories. Furthermore, colonial policies and capitalist development have severely impacted traditional indigenous economic systems. Consequently, indigenous people are facing many barriers to employment in ways that often differ from the experiences of other minority groups.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Thomas N. Garavan and Michael Coolahan

Reviews the literature on career mobility and considers its implications for career development practices within organizations. Focuses on individualistic and organizational…

4532

Abstract

Reviews the literature on career mobility and considers its implications for career development practices within organizations. Focuses on individualistic and organizational perspectives and identifies a range of factors which facilitate or inhibit the mobility process. Identifies a range of career development implications including changing notions about what constitutes a career, the need to take into account business issues and the move towards joint career planning.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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