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Article
Publication date: 27 December 2022

John Aliu, Douglas Aghimien, Clinton Aigbavboa, Andrew Ebekozien, Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke, Samuel Adeniyi Adekunle, Opeoluwa Akinradewo and Olushola Akinshipe

As the world experiences a rapid rise in technological advances, the engineering profession will be required to become even more socially responsible and emotionally…

Abstract

Purpose

As the world experiences a rapid rise in technological advances, the engineering profession will be required to become even more socially responsible and emotionally stable to be able to display higher levels of empathy towards the society they serve. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the key emotional competencies (ECs) that engineers need to possess to thrive in the construction industry after graduation.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was conducted with close-ended questionnaires developed and administered to built environment professionals such as architects, construction managers, construction project managers, engineers and quantity surveyors.

Findings

The results showed that the ability to display a positive outlook on life, understand one's emotional triggers, ability to display resilience in hard times, control one's emotions and ability to show compassion to others were the highest-ranked ECs. Further analysis revealed four clusters such as self-awareness, empathy, self-regulation and self-motivation.

Practical implications

Practical guidance for higher education institutions is offered in terms of revamping and revisiting their engineering education curricula to develop these ECs to produce emotionally sound engineers for the ever-changing world of work.

Originality/value

As the world of work becomes increasingly dynamic and diverse, engineers will be required to possess empathy, social skills and high levels of ECs to be able to seamlessly interact with fellow professionals as well as the society they serve.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Joakim Tell and Maya Hoveskog

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to rethink the traditional approach to education in the university engineering curriculum. The paper examines two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to rethink the traditional approach to education in the university engineering curriculum. The paper examines two engineering projects led by university students in Sweden: the design and construction of a solar-powered car taking part in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge and the creation of a business model for the ownership phase of an electric car together with Polestar.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was conducted. Students were interviewed and surveyed on their impressions of their learning experience in the two projects and student logbooks reviewed. Problem-based learning (PBL), the Conceiving, Designing, Implementing and Operating approach and the ABCD procedure are used. Results are compared to theories from the literature.

Findings

PBL in real-world settings can increase engineering students’ technical knowledge and improve their technical skills as they solve complex problems or propose solutions to such problems. Such projects also strengthen students’ commitment, self-confidence and self-esteem as well as promote co-operation and creativity. These are soft skills largely absent from traditional engineering education.

Practical implications

Innovative, student-led learning in the applied engineering curriculum can foster students’ soft skills in ways that teacher-led, lecture-style learning does not.

Originality/value

This research offers a timely perspective on an issue of current interest in engineering education: student-led learning versus teacher-led learning. The paper also provides two illustrative student-led projects that focus on sustainability and mobility.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Liangyan Tao, Ailin Liang, Naiming Xie and Sifeng Liu

The year 2022 marks the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the grey system theory (GST), which has been widely applied in the engineering field. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The year 2022 marks the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the grey system theory (GST), which has been widely applied in the engineering field. This paper aims to systematically identify the achievements, hotspots, knowledge structure and emerging trends in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A bibliometrics analysis was conducted on relevant publications retrieved from Web of Science (WoS) using CiteSpace and MapEquation. A statistical analysis of the collected 3,384 papers was completed. Three networks, including a co-occurrence network, cooperation network and co-citation network, were obtained to draw knowledge structure, hotspots and research frontiers.

Findings

The top four applied engineering fields are engineering electrical electronics, computer science artificial intelligence, engineering multi-disciplinary and automation control system. In total, 65 countries have engaged in this field, and China has occupied a leading position, with the largest number of articles published and the widest cooperation with other countries. The USA, United Kingdom (UK) and China Taiwan also contribute a lot. The Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Professor Liu Sifeng have a core position in the cooperation network. More hotspots appear in the last ten years. Regarding the emerging trends, the combination of theoretical models and practical engineering problems has attracted more attention. Besides, the application of GST in environment protection and the integration of the GST and intelligent algorithm became more popular.

Originality/value

The comprehensive bibliometrics analysis and visualization demonstration were conducted, presenting the interdisciplinary characteristics, major research topics and research frontiers in this field.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1968

The engineering profession has been bitterly attacked by many technical college teachers (myself included) for the crude restrictive practices it maintains in engineering

Abstract

The engineering profession has been bitterly attacked by many technical college teachers (myself included) for the crude restrictive practices it maintains in engineering education. Most of the criticisms of CEI's new policy on admission to corporate membership policy have not sufficiently recognized that the profession has a real problem: its educational standards are much too low for British engineers to be competitive in the international industrial scene. The Ministry of Technology has for several years given strong backing to the move to close the door to HNC entry to full professional status because it believes strongly that engineers trained in this way would cut a poor figure in the European Community which generally admits to the status of engineer only graduates of university courses considerably longer than the standard 3‐year course of British universities. And after meeting a continental engineer who not only has a mature understanding of modern mathematics and physics, but also a reasonable knowledge of economics and fluency in two or three languages, one is compelled to admit that they have a point. I taught HNC engineers for many years and have no illusions about the academic standards or professional adequacy of these courses but I am not convinced that many university courses are substantially better. Students spend far too much time practising routines and writing those endless dull laboratory reports that can bear little relationship to work in industry. The sheer tedium of engineering courses make; students into dull engineers and worst than that it keeps many bright people out of engineering. At a recent students' meeting I heard arts and social science student: protesting that engineering students did not participate in activities outside the classroom, that they tolerated any treat ment meted out to them and that then was little interest among engineers in cross‐disciplinary discussions. I was appalled that so many of the engineers seemed inclined to accept this evaluation of themselves and several times engineering students have explained to me that it is a fact of life that intelligent people avoid the study of engineering. The CEI is trying to improve the image of the engineer but, judging from the contemptuous references to ‘spanner men’ I have heard in several universities this year, they are not likely to achieve this merely by labelling as an outcast anyone who failed to get 2 A‐levels before he left school.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Yvette James‐Gordon and Jay Bal

An investigation was conducted in the design department of a medium‐sized automotive company to establish engineers’ preferred learning styles. This was achieved by using…

2888

Abstract

An investigation was conducted in the design department of a medium‐sized automotive company to establish engineers’ preferred learning styles. This was achieved by using two proven questionnaires followed by statistical analysis methods. The evidence showed that the engineers investigated have a significant visual learning style preference. This means that their learning is more effective by using diagrams, sketches, photographs, schematics, flow charts, pictures, videos, computer graphics, and demonstrations in training programmes and in their everyday working environment. The present computer‐aided design (CAD) training in the company does incorporate some of these visual techniques and so does satisfy the engineers’ visual learning style preference. Evidence also suggested that there is not a need to have different training and learning methods for design engineers and for managerial engineers such as project engineers and team leaders.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

James O. Uhomoibhi

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Bologna Process in the light of globalisation and examine how it affects curriculum and engineering education developments.

1439

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Bologna Process in the light of globalisation and examine how it affects curriculum and engineering education developments.

Design/methodology/approach

The growing need for creative competitiveness and the striving for specific profiles of engineering qualifications that are of high quality whilst taking account of diversity, transparency have resulted in the declaration of the Bologna Process. The qualifications framework proposed involving the cycle systems are examined taking account of globalization, quality assurance, management and diversity of needs. The future opportunities are explored taking account of global expectations.

Findings

The present research reveals that the Bologna Process provides a means through which higher education institutions (HEIs) can be encouraged to provide more attractive curricula for the younger generation for differing cultures whilst catering for the broad range of engineering fields where they could become more active later. The point is made that it serves to re‐invent engineering to meet the needs of the twenty‐first century.

Research limitations/implications

The present investigation focuses on the Bologna Process and its implications on engineering education in Europe. Future work hopes to extend this to other disciplines and to examine global effects in diverse cultures and also from gender, economic and development perspectives.

Practical implications

This paper could provoke HEIs outside Europe to evaluating their policies, revise strategies and moderate existing provisions, thereby assessing impact of the Bologna Process on engineering education in different countries and cultures.

Originality/value

Account is taken of the diversity and transparency which have resulted in the declaration of the Bologna Process. The paper discusses and reports on developments, prospects and challenges faced in the engineering curriculum provision following the introduction of the Bologna Process in the culturally diverse European higher education area. The new field of process systems engineering is also reported.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1978

It is important that aeronautical engineers are aware of submissions being made to the Finniston Committee

Abstract

It is important that aeronautical engineers are aware of submissions being made to the Finniston Committee

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2007

Denise Brush

The purpose of this article is to describe the quantitative evaluation of an engineering monograph approval plan using circulation analysis.

1054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe the quantitative evaluation of an engineering monograph approval plan using circulation analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The circulation frequency of titles purchased under the approval plan was analyzed, and compared with the circulation frequency of all engineering books during the same time period, purchased both individually and through the plan.

Findings

It was found that 23 percent of the approval plan books circulated, compared with 6 percent of engineering books as a whole. There was considerable variation in circulation frequency between engineering disciplines, but approval plan books circulated much more frequently in all subject areas.

Research limitations/implications

This study assesses circulation only during the most recent complete year, which means that the approval plan books are all new books. However, more than half of the books in the engineering collection are less than ten years old, so age is unlikely to be the only reason for the much higher circulation of approval books.

Practical implications

Since this evaluation concludes that the approval plan does have value for Rowan University's users, such a plan might be worth considering by other academic libraries looking for a better way to obtain new engineering monographs which serve user needs.

Originality/value

While the circulation data described in this study reflect the unique needs of the Rowan University user community, they can serve as a useful benchmark for engineering librarians who want to assess the usage of their monograph collections. The study also has value for academic librarians who are evaluating an approval plan from YBP or another vendor.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1970

M.R. Denning, Wilberforce and L.J. Phillimore

March 20, 1970 Industrial training — Industrial training levy — Engineering industry — Company providing steam generating plant for thermal power stations — Assembly of…

Abstract

March 20, 1970 Industrial training — Industrial training levy — Engineering industry — Company providing steam generating plant for thermal power stations — Assembly of pre‐manufactured parts on site — Whether activity of engineering industry or construction industry — Definition of civil engineering work expressly including construction of thermal power station — Whether general words of exception operative to take essential process of construction of thermal power station out of civil engineering — Whether company liable to pay engineering industry levy or construction industry levy — Industrial Training Act, 1964 (c.16), ss. 1,4 — Industrial Training (Engineering Board) Order, 1968 (S.I. 1968, No. 1333), Sch., paras. 1(h)(ii), 2(d), 3.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Marc Wouters, Susana Morales, Sven Grollmuss and Michael Scheer

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product development, and it provides a comparison to an earlier review of the management accounting (MA) literature (Wouters & Morales, 2014).

Methodology/approach

This structured literature search covers papers published in 23 journals in IOM in the period 1990–2014.

Findings

The search yielded a sample of 208 unique papers with 275 results (one paper could refer to multiple cost management methods). The top 3 methods are modular design, component commonality, and product platforms, with 115 results (42%) together. In the MA literature, these three methods accounted for 29%, but target costing was the most researched cost management method by far (26%). Simulation is the most frequently used research method in the IOM literature, whereas this was averagely used in the MA literature; qualitative studies were the most frequently used research method in the MA literature, whereas this was averagely used in the IOM literature. We found a lot of papers presenting practical approaches or decision models as a further development of a particular cost management method, which is a clear difference from the MA literature.

Research limitations/implications

This review focused on the same cost management methods, and future research could also consider other cost management methods which are likely to be more important in the IOM literature compared to the MA literature. Future research could also investigate innovative cost management practices in more detail through longitudinal case studies.

Originality/value

This review of research on methods for cost management published outside the MA literature provides an overview for MA researchers. It highlights key differences between both literatures in their research of the same cost management methods.

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