Search results

1 – 10 of over 135000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Sanya Ojo

This study aims to discover how ethnic entrepreneurs actually understand the performance of their business through clarification of key indicators they use in evaluating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discover how ethnic entrepreneurs actually understand the performance of their business through clarification of key indicators they use in evaluating business success and failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The attribution of success and failure in business was investigated through in-depth interviews, bolstered by the self-determination theory, with some UK’s Black African entrepreneurs.

Findings

Findings suggest that ethnic entrepreneurs’ attribution of success and failure is not only subjectively constructed but also enacted through cultural symbolism. The combination of cultural and personal values provoked attitudinal idiosyncrasy that construes business failure as success.

Originality/value

The result offers valuable knowledge to academics/practitioners researching success and failure factors in the ethnic entrepreneurship field.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Mike Simpson, Joanne Padmore and Nicki Newman

The purpose of this study is to develop an academic theoretical framework relating success and performance in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) so that future…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an academic theoretical framework relating success and performance in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) so that future research could be carried out to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) for SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a literature review, in‐depth interviews with owner‐managers of SMEs and a knowledge elicitation exercise was carried out based on the experience of the researchers and on the interviews with owner‐managers.

Findings

A new academic conceptual model was developed linking CSFs, definitions of success and performance to the characteristics of the business environment, the characteristics of the owner‐manager and the characteristics of the business. The relatively new idea that feedback on performance in the model could modify the strategic/tactical behaviour of the SME owner‐managers was introduced.

Research limitations/implications

The many research problems posed by performance studies aimed at establishing CSFs in SMEs are still present in the current framework but a longitudinal research methodology could be employed to avoid these problems in future research.

Practical implications

The theoretical framework offers a different way forward for both practitioners and business advisors in thinking about those factors that may be critical for success in SMEs.

Originality/value

This is a new framework that can be used to inform thinking and research design in the area of performance measurement and success.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Jodyanne Jane Kirkwood

Women and men business owners are often thought to have different success criteria for their businesses, but there is little empirical research to support this. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Women and men business owners are often thought to have different success criteria for their businesses, but there is little empirical research to support this. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of self-defined success factors, and to compare women and men’s success criteria.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed 216 New Zealand business owners’ (78 women, 138 men) self-perceived success criteria for their businesses. Results are based primarily on an open-ended question on their interpretation of what success means to them. In total, 30 main categories of success factors were identified, and the four main factors analyzed in depth.

Findings

The four most frequently occurring success factors were financial success, personal satisfaction, work-life/work-family balance, and satisfied stakeholders. Women and men business owners described very similar success criteria, which were balanced across financial success and personal and relationship factors. No statistically significant gender differences were found in the incidence of these success factors, suggesting a movement of male business owners to a more holistic view of business success that incorporates financial success, alongside personal and relationship aspects.

Research limitations/implications

Offers implications for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners. Highlights the need to be careful when designing research studies in multi-faceted areas such as business success, and also in gender comparative studies.

Originality/value

Uses self-perceived success criteria to assess gender differences.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Yisca Monnickendam-Givon, Dafna Schwartz and Benjamin Gidron

The utilization of social networks is known to have an impact on micro-enterprise success. This study aims to examine the contribution of social networks in acquiring…

Abstract

Purpose

The utilization of social networks is known to have an impact on micro-enterprise success. This study aims to examine the contribution of social networks in acquiring resources and their role in the enterprise’s success.

Design/methodology/approach

A business’s success is influenced by its network structure and the network’s resources. The authors examine whether unique religious-cultural characteristics affect the social networks contribution to a business’s success. This model examines the network utilization of women entrepreneurs who own micro-enterprises in ultra-religious groups. The sample consists of 123 surveys completed by Jewish ultra-Orthodox women entrepreneurs in Israel. Data collection was conducted between February and June 2013. The authors used a snowball sampling approach where interviewees were asked to refer us to other entrepreneurs. In the hour-long interview, a questionnaire was used with open and closed questions.

Findings

Findings indicate that strong personal ties provide a micro-enterprise with social legitimacy, emotional support and assistance in the management and operation of daily activities. However, contrary to the existing literature, network utilization did not contribute to enterprise success. That is, in religious communities in particular, social networks enable the existence of businesses, but do not contribute to their success.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this paper are the mapping of the social network resources used by the business owner, such as financial consultations or professional assistance, as well as distinguishing between strong and weak ties, which reflect the intensity of the contact for better use of the social network by the entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This study examined social networks’ contribution to the acquisition of resources, as well as the part they play in the success of ultra-orthodox women micro-entrepreneurs and perhaps other religious and minorities groups.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

James Espey

A case study is given of International Distillers & Vintners(UK) Limited (IDV (UK)) and an assessment made of the viability oftranslating theory into practice in the real…

Abstract

A case study is given of International Distillers & Vintners (UK) Limited (IDV (UK)) and an assessment made of the viability of translating theory into practice in the real world – the importance of having a strategy, of strategic planning, and having a success factor as a key component of an organisation′s competitive advantage. Following the appointment of a new managing director at IDV (UK) in 1982, three goals were established: (1) to more than double profits within five years; (2) to increase return on capital employed by almost 50 per cent within five years; and (3) to be the outstanding wine and spirit company in the UK. A sound strategy was required to achieve these goals. The historic background of the organisation is given and the strategic position of IDV (UK) in relation to its competitors and market share is described. A review of the state of the market is given and possible areas for expansion discussed. The quality and pedigree of certain brands and the quality and strength of leadership are proposed as the success factors upon which IDV (UK) could build. Details are given of how the organisation built upon these factors to achieve strategic success; the lessons learned; and the level of achievement and success in the marketplace.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Tricia Vilkinas, Greg Cartan and Judith Saebel

The purpose of this paper is to understand what was important to managers of businesses in desert Australia, and in particular, what they needed for the businesses to be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what was important to managers of businesses in desert Australia, and in particular, what they needed for the businesses to be successful.

Design/methodology/approach

There were two studies. In Study 1, 88 managers of business in remote desert Australia were interviewed. In Study 2, 112 managers who had business in regional desert Australia participated in an on‐line survey.

Findings

In both studies, the respondents claimed that their businesses were reasonably successful. In Study 1, the interviewees said that making a living and seeing the business grow were important indices of success. In Study 2, customer/client satisfaction was the strongest indicator of business success. Factors such as safe and all‐weather roads, internet/e‐mail access and reliable power supplies were important to this success. The importance to business success of a number of leadership behaviours was also identified.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to encourage a larger number of managers to participate. In addition, suppliers and customers of the businesses need to be included.

Originality/value

This is the first study in which managers were included, because normally, only owner‐managers are involved. It is also the first study of its kind to be undertaken in desert Australia.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Ogechi Adeola, Prince Gyimah, Kingsley Opoku Appiah and Robert N. Lussier

This study contributes to answering the question, can critical success factors of small businesses in emerging markets advance United Nation (UN) Sustainable Development…

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to answering the question, can critical success factors of small businesses in emerging markets advance United Nation (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)? Specifically, this study aims to explore the critical factors contributing to the success of small businesses and ultimately the UN SDGs in the emerging market of Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The design is survey research testing the Lussier success vs failure prediction model for small businesses in Nigeria. The methodology includes a logistic regression model to better understand and predict the factors that contribute to success or failure using a data set of 201 small businesses in Nigeria.

Findings

The findings support the validity of the Lussier model (p = 0.000) in Nigeria as the model accurately predicted 84.4% of the small businesses as successful or failed with a high R-square value (R = 0.540). The most significant factors (t-values < 0.05) that predict the success or failure of businesses support the findings that business owners that start with adequate capital, keep records and financial controls, use professional advice, have better product/service timing, and have parents who own businesses can increase the probability of success.

Practical implications

The study provides a list of critical success factors contributing to the growth of small business in Nigeria, the largest economy in Africa. The findings can help entrepreneurs avoid failure and advance UN SDGs 1, 2, 8 and 10. Implications for current and future entrepreneurs, public agencies, consultants, educators, policymakers, suppliers and investors are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first study to determine the factors that contribute to the success or failure of small businesses in Nigeria using the Lussier model. It also discusses how to advance four of the UN sustainability goals. Results support the Lussier model's global validity that can be used in both emerging and developed markets, and it contributes to the development of theory.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Helen Reijonen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how business owners in microbusinesses perceive success and how that perception may influence the growth of their enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how business owners in microbusinesses perceive success and how that perception may influence the growth of their enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of three separate studies were analysed. The data were collected with questionnaires and interviews among microbusinesses in the industries of craft and rural tourism in the area of North Karelia, Eastern Finland. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in the analysis.

Findings

The paper found that the motives and goals of the small business owners were not oriented towards growth, but to quality of life, job satisfaction and satisfied clientele. Consequently, business success was measured by the respect and satisfaction of the customers, job satisfaction and the quality of product. From an economic perspective, making a reasonable living, not growth, constituted a measure of success.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation is affected by the fact that the study concerns two individual industries in a small geographical area.

Practical implications

For policy makers, the study offers insight into the factors that affect the behaviour and decision‐making of the microbusiness entrepreneurs and, thus, the performance of their enterprise.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theory development by examining the little studied possible conflicts between financial and personal measures of success.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Anis Omri, Maha Ayadi Frikha and Mohamed Amine Bouraoui

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mediational model of small businesses success. In this paper, the authors investigate how the human, social, and financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mediational model of small businesses success. In this paper, the authors investigate how the human, social, and financial capital of entrepreneurs influences the capacity of small business to succeed. The objective through this model is to demonstrate that it is through the process of innovation these capitals are converted into success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper suggests an original, conceptual framework for how small businesses can succeed.

Findings

To validate this mediational model, the authors used the conditions/steps proposed by Baron and Kenny (1986).

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study have implications for both research and practice. This study provides a new contribution to the existing literature by introducing the innovation in the explanation of the links between these capitals and small business success, i.e. business with greater access to human and financial resources are more likely to undertake an innovation, which, in turn, ensures small business success and access to more financial capital facilitates the pursuit of resource-intensive success strategies because, it is argued, that slack resources can be used for experimentation with new strategies and practices, allowing the business to pursue new opportunities of success.

Practical implications

The proposition is consistent that managers with considerable human capital, social, and finacial capital know where to look for opportunities, can more accurately assess the value of potential opportunities, and have the ability to exploit these opportunities, which encourages innovation. It is this innovation that then facilitates small business success. These resources are important to achieve small business success, but primarily because they encourage innovation, and it is the innovation that drives the small business success.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors extend the entrepreneurial literature by developing a mediation model of small business success. To the authors’ knowledge, it is the first study that examined the indirect effect of human, social, and financial capital of entrepreneurs on small business success through the mediation of innovation. This model has the indirect effect of human, social, and financial capital on success through their impact on innovation, i.e., through the innovation process such capital is converted into success.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

R. Dobbins and B.O. Pettman

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections…

Abstract

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on creativity and dealing with change; importance of clear goal setting; developing winning business and marketing strategies; negotiating skills; leadership; financial skills; and time management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 135000