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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Nathan Garrett, Brian Thoms, Nimer Alrushiedat and Terry Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to show the practicality of a new portfolio design that incorporates distributed content, emphasizes student ownership, encourages social learning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the practicality of a new portfolio design that incorporates distributed content, emphasizes student ownership, encourages social learning, and acknowledges the central importance of ease of use.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach's practicality is demonstrated through survey results and usage logs from two case studies.

Findings

Students enjoy using this system, and report that its social aspects improve their academic performance and motivation. They also report it as being more social than their past experiences with BlackBoard.

Originality/value

The paper provides support for a vision of distributed educational software centered on portfolios, anchored by course tools, connected to assessment outcomes, and opened for public learning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Michael Feldstein

531

Abstract

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Raymond M. Hahn and Brian H. Kleiner

Describes management techniques under three topics, leadership, motivation of employees and orientation of new employees. Outlines 14 points to becoming a successful leader. Lists…

780

Abstract

Describes management techniques under three topics, leadership, motivation of employees and orientation of new employees. Outlines 14 points to becoming a successful leader. Lists 15 work‐related motivational factors and considers their order of importance and discusses the concerns of new employees. Briefly gives a synopsis of a successful orientation programme.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian H. Kleiner

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products…

18284

Abstract

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products industry, motor vehicle and parts industry, information technology industry, food industry, the airline industry in a turbulent environment, the automotive sales industry, and specialist retailing industry. Outlines the main features of each industry and the environment in which it is operating. Provides examples, insights and quotes from Chief Executive Officers, managers and employees on their organization’s recipe for success. Mentions the effect technology has had in some industries. Talks about skilled and semi‐skilled workers, worker empowerment and the formation of teams. Addresses also the issue of change and the training that is required to deal with it in different industry sectors. Discusses remuneration packages and incentives offered to motivate employees. Notes the importance of customers in the face of increased competition. Extracts from each industry sector the various human resource practices that companies employ to manage their employees effectively ‐ revealing that there is a wide diversity in approach and what is right for one industry sector would not work in another. Offers some advice for managers, but, overall, fails to summarize what constitutes effective means of managing human behaviour.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Liam Magee and James A. Thom

The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of the standardisation of two largely overlapping electronic document formats between 2005 and 2008, and its implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of the standardisation of two largely overlapping electronic document formats between 2005 and 2008, and its implications for future IT standards development.

Design/methodology/approach

The document format controversy is researched as an exemplary case study of the institutional rivalries, perspectives and strategic interests at play in standardisation processes. The study adopts a methodological lens of discursive institutionalism in order to explain how actors assume and perform a variety of roles during the controversy. It consults a range of documentary sources, including media commentary, corporate press releases and blog posts, financial reports and technical specifications.

Findings

The study shows that: first, intentions to increase competition in the office software market through the standardisation of document formats led to a standards “arms race”; second, this further entrenched the position of a single market actor; and third, the resulting public debate nevertheless has reinvigorated the push for genuinely open standards.

Social implications

Information technology standards are often touted as mechanisms for increasing the competitiveness of a market, thereby benefitting consumers and the greater public. In the presence of dominant institutional actors, efforts to standardise can, perversely, undermine this benefit. Increased public scrutiny through online media offers a potential remedy.

Originality/value

This research presents a novel account of the controversy over the document format standardisation process, understood through the lens of discursive institutionalism. It also shows the increasing and potentially putative role of online media in the development of IT standards generally.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Bagga Bjerge, Karen Duke and Vibeke Asmussen Frank

The purpose of this paper is to examine the shifting roles of medical professionals as stakeholders in opioid substitution treatment (OST) policies and practices in Denmark and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the shifting roles of medical professionals as stakeholders in opioid substitution treatment (OST) policies and practices in Denmark and the UK within the past 15 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on literature reviews, documentary analyses and key informant interviews with a range of stakeholders involved in OST and policy in Denmark and UK. The study is part of the EU-funded project: Addictions and Lifestyles in Contemporary Europe: Reframing Addictions Project.

Findings

Denmark and the UK are amongst those few European countries that have long traditions and elaborate systems for providing OST to heroin users. The UK has a history of dominance of medical professionals in drugs treatment, although this has been recently challenged by the recovery movement. In Denmark, a social problem approach has historically dominated the field, but a recent trend towards medicalisation can be traced. As in all kinds of policy changes, multiple factors are at play when shifts occur. We examine how both countries’ developments around drugs treatment policy and practice relate to broader societal, economic and political changes, how such divergent developments emerge and how medical professionals as stakeholders enhanced their roles as experts in the field through a variety of tactics, including the production and use of “evidence”, which became a key tool to promote specific stakeholder’s perspectives in these processes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to current policy and practice debates by providing comparative analyses of drug policies and examination of stakeholder influences on policy processes.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Fred Beard, Brian Petrotta and Ludwig Dischner

Contemporary practitioners of content marketing (CM) often suggest their discipline is an ancient one, yet mainly limit its origins to the custom-published magazines of the late…

2891

Abstract

Purpose

Contemporary practitioners of content marketing (CM) often suggest their discipline is an ancient one, yet mainly limit its origins to the custom-published magazines of the late 1800s. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize some of the many definitions of CM and to report the first scholarly history of its development and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s purposes led to the following research questions: To what extent were CM strategies and tactics used before the 20th century? How have the uses and characteristics of CM changed or remained the same over time? Sources included general histories focusing on the earliest uses of advertising and promotions and edited book chapters and journal articles on the histories of branding and early print advertising, marketing and advertising practices in ancient and medieval periods and the development of consumer cultures around the world.

Findings

Research findings support three conclusions: CM existed much earlier than often acknowledged; has emerged as a unique marketing discipline, strategically and tactically distinguishable from the others (e.g. advertising and sales promotion); and possesses objectives, strategies and tactics that have remained remarkably consistent in practice across the millennia.

Originality/value

The research supports several insights to the history of marketing and the practice of CM. Some of the CM strategies and tactics identified in this paper, for instance, have previously been concluded to be part of advertising’s history. Findings also reveal that many of advertising’s American pioneers actually used CM to persuade 19th-century businessmen to adopt widespread advertising. In addition, the emphasis on interactive, digital media in CM definitions offers a likely explanation for the recent enthusiasm behind CM as a response to global trends in consumer preferences and global competition, as well as why contemporary CM practitioners have often failed to recognize they are practicing a “new” discipline that has actually been in use for thousands of years.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

52

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

IT and society There oughta be a law. Too much of the UK legal profession is in the dark when it comes to information technology, says Professor Brian Napier. Speaking at his…

Abstract

IT and society There oughta be a law. Too much of the UK legal profession is in the dark when it comes to information technology, says Professor Brian Napier. Speaking at his inaugural lecture as the first holder of the Digital chair at Queen Mary and Westfield College, itself the first established chair in IT at a British University, Napier called for law reformers to wake up to the ramifications of IT.

Details

Online Review, vol. 15 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ying Wang and Brian H. Kleiner

The major forms of employee dishonesty include: top management fraud, worker’s compensation fraud, and employee’s lying and theft. This article will focus on discussing these…

2082

Abstract

The major forms of employee dishonesty include: top management fraud, worker’s compensation fraud, and employee’s lying and theft. This article will focus on discussing these different types of dishonest behaviours, their underlying dynamics, possible solutions and preventive measures. Moreover, some typical cases in the United States like World Com fraud, workers’ compensation fraud, and some lying and stealing behaviours will be discussed. Finally, this article may help understand the importance for top management to be an ethical role model, and the importance of creating an honest and satisfactory working environment.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31