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Article

Leigh Robinson and Brian Minikin

The purpose of this paper is to set out research that aimed to understand how the internal capabilities of Olympic sport organisations can be addressed.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out research that aimed to understand how the internal capabilities of Olympic sport organisations can be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out by a mixed‐method, multi phase approach, using senior sport administrators in the Pacific region.

Findings

The research developed a tool for analysing the “readiness” of sport organisations to deliver programmes and services.

Research limitations/implications

This research has developed a framework for the internal diagnosis of organisations.

Practical implications

Managers can use the tool to inform their strategic planning.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new and unique tool for assessing organisational capacity.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Article

Brian Minikin

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the existing mechanisms for legitimising member based sport organisations can lead to poor governance and how accepted…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the existing mechanisms for legitimising member based sport organisations can lead to poor governance and how accepted democratic processes can be manipulated to suit the personal agenda of individuals over the vision of the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cases are provided to illustrate how, it is relatively easy for individuals to manipulate the established rules in order to obtain and retain power.

Findings

The self-regulatory nature of sport assumes that elected representatives put the organisation’s interests before their own and that they always act in the best interests of the members. The evidence, provided in this paper, suggests that this assumption may be inappropriate.

Research limitations/implications

The case studies provided occurred within the boundaries of one continental grouping of countries and may be considered biased due to the specific demographic characteristics of this part of the world and the relative lack of development of sport systems that exist there.

Practical implications

The paper raises important questions about the appropriateness of the legitimising mechanisms that affect sport and the challenges that face modern sport organisations.

Social implications

The paper may provide a basis for arguing that the concepts of democracy and autonomy in sport organisations need to be reviewed if their autonomy is to be maintained.

Originality/value

This paper provides a basis for challenging the basis of how sport is structured and how member based sport organisations are legitimised to operate as they do.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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