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1 – 10 of 198
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Lori Leach, Bradley Hastings, Gavin Schwarz, Bernadette Watson, Dave Bouckenooghe, Leonardo Seoane and David Hewett

This paper aims to extend the consideration of distributed leadership in health-care settings. Leadership is typically studied from the classical notion of the place of single…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the consideration of distributed leadership in health-care settings. Leadership is typically studied from the classical notion of the place of single leaders and continues to examine distributed leadership within small teams or horizontally. The purpose is to develop a practical understanding of how distributed leadership may occur vertically, between different layers of the health-care leadership hierarchy, examining its influence on health-care outcomes across two hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using semi-structured interviews, data were collected from 107 hospital employees (including executive leadership, clinical management and clinicians) from two hospitals in Australia and the USA. Using thematic content analysis, an iterative process was adopted characterized by alternating between social identity and distributed leadership literature and empirical themes to answer the question of how the practice of distributed leadership influences performance outcomes in hospitals?

Findings

The perceived social identities of leadership groups shaped communication and performance both positively and negatively. In one hospital a moderating structure emerged as a leadership dyad, where leadership was distributed vertically between hospital hierarchal layers, observed to overcome communication limitations. Findings suggest dyad creation is an effective mechanism to overcome hospital hierarchy-based communication issues and ameliorate health-care outcomes.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates how current leadership development practices that focus on leadership relational and social competencies can benefit from a structural approach to include leadership dyads that can foster these same competencies. This approach could help develop future hospital leaders and in doing so, improve hospital outcomes.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Dave Bouckenooghe, Gavin M. Schwarz, Bradley Hastings and Sandor G. Lukacs de Pereny

The vast majority of interventions during organizational change tend to focus on individually-held attitudes toward change. However, groups often form collective attitudes that…

Abstract

The vast majority of interventions during organizational change tend to focus on individually-held attitudes toward change. However, groups often form collective attitudes that are distinct from those held by its individual members, and organizational change often necessitates collective attitude change within teams, work units, or even the entire organization. We challenge the dominant view that collective attitudes to organizational change merely reflect an aggregation of individual attitudes by considering how and why collectively-held change attitudes are formed and activated. Drawing on social network theory, we propose an alternative approach toward an understanding of change. Acknowledging and detailing attitude formation as a social response to change – a social system of interaction among change recipients – we explain how collective attitudes to organizational change emerge. With this stance, individuals may hold broad and differing attitudes, but as a group can come together to share a collective attitude toward change. Using this approach, we explain how collective attitudes and individual attitudes are linked through top-down or bottom-up processes, or a combination of both. Developing this alternative perspective improves our understanding of how collective attitudes to change develop and evolve and enables both scholars and practitioners to better manage and influence the formation of change-supportive collective attitudes.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-554-3

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-554-3

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Nick De Viggiani

Prison social environments play an important role in the health of prisoners. How they respond to imprisonment is partially dependent upon how effectively they integrate into an…

Abstract

Prison social environments play an important role in the health of prisoners. How they respond to imprisonment is partially dependent upon how effectively they integrate into an institution’s social structure, learn to fit in with others and adapt to and cope with becoming detached from society, community and family ‐ hence, how they personally manage the transition from free society to a closed carceral community. This paper reports on findings of an ethnography conducted in an adult male training prison in England, which used participant observation, group interviewing, and one‐to‐one semi‐structured interviews with prisoners and prison officers. The research explored participants’ perceptions of imprisonment, particularly with regard to how they learned to adapt to and ‘survive’ in prison and their perceptions of how prison affected their mental, social and physical well‐being. It revealed that the social world of prison and a prisoner’s dislocation from society constitute two key areas of ‘deprivation’ that can have important health impacts.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 April 2024

Addison Sellon and Lindsay Hastings

Applying traditional grounded theory techniques, the present research reanalyzed secondary data from four previously conducted studies to explore how generativity is manifested in…

Abstract

Purpose

Applying traditional grounded theory techniques, the present research reanalyzed secondary data from four previously conducted studies to explore how generativity is manifested in young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A new conceptual model of generativity was developed to depict how generativity manifests among this age group.

Findings

This study's findings provide leadership educators with a refined approach to interacting with this construct while simultaneously increasing young adults’ potential ability to experience the benefits available to them through generativity at an earlier stage in their lives.

Originality/value

This study advances the field of leadership education by establishing foundational insight into the uniqueness of generativity’s development in young adulthood.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2023

Mine Haktanir and Ezgi Gullu

This study aims to develop a better understanding of the key determinants of repetitive visits to coffee shops. The paper intends to answer a simple, yet crucial question, “Why do…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a better understanding of the key determinants of repetitive visits to coffee shops. The paper intends to answer a simple, yet crucial question, “Why do people go to coffee shops repeatedly, and frequently?”.

Design/methodology/approach

Two coffee shops in North Cyprus are used as case studies in order to provide in-depth information about the perceptions and experiences of coffee shop clients, managers and staff. An inductive methodological structure together with qualitative data collection methods provided a rich, exploratory setting.

Findings

A social network of customers and employees, communication with familiar people and sharing a homely feel are found to be the key determinants of clients' attachment. Comfort, security, sense of belonging and the convenience of the place also play a pivotal role. The traditional habit of coffee drinking is a prime motivation for people of this area to meet up and socialize.

Practical implications

Managers can optimize operational results as it is evident that social and cultural elements are the key drivers for repeat customer visits, while regional planners can set society-driven policies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by using a holistic approach to understand the factors which influence revisit intentions of coffee shop clients in relation to the third place, the place attachment and the service space concepts. The research approach employed is also significant as it enabled the presentation of the real-life dynamics and its relation to the literature.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Sara A. Kreindler, Stephanie Hastings, Sara Mallinson, Meaghan Brierley, Arden Birney, Rima Tarraf, Shannon Winters, Keir Johnson, Leah Nicholson, Mohammed Rashidul Anwar and Zaid Aboud

Interventions to hasten patient discharge continue to proliferate despite evidence that they may be achieving diminishing returns. To better understand what such interventions can…

Abstract

Purpose

Interventions to hasten patient discharge continue to proliferate despite evidence that they may be achieving diminishing returns. To better understand what such interventions can be expected to accomplish, the authors aim to critically examine their underlying program theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a broader study on patient flow, spanning 10 jurisdictions across Western Canada, the authors conducted in-depth interviews with 300 senior, middle and frontline managers; 174 discussed discharge initiatives. Using thematic analysis informed by a Realistic Evaluation lens, the authors identified the mechanisms by which discharge activities were believed to produce their impacts and the strategies and context factors necessary to trigger the intended mechanisms.

Findings

Managers' accounts suggested a common program theory that applied to a wide variety of discharge initiatives. The chief mechanism was inculcation of a sharp focus on discharge; reinforcing mechanisms included development of shared understanding and a sense of accountability. Participants reported that these mechanisms were difficult to produce and sustain, requiring continual active management and repeated (re)introduction of interventions. This reflected a context in which providers, already overwhelmed with competing demands, were unlikely to be able (or perhaps even willing) to sustain a focus on this particular aspect of care.

Originality/value

The finding that “discharge focus” emerged as the core mechanism of discharge interventions helps to explain why such initiatives may be achieving limited benefit. There is a need for interventions that promote timely discharge without relying on this highly problematic mechanism.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2020

Eleanor Burch and John Rose

Research suggests that individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) are inconsistently supported throughout the criminal justice system (CJS) in the UK. Bradley (2009…

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) are inconsistently supported throughout the criminal justice system (CJS) in the UK. Bradley (2009) recommended the introduction of criminal justice liaison and diversion (L&D) teams to bridge the gap between the CJS and mental health services and provide a more consistent and improved quality of support for individuals with vulnerabilities, including those with autism. This study aims to explore the experiences of staff working in L&D teams who encounter individuals with ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with ten L&D team members. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to gain insight into their lived experiences of working with autism in the CJS.

Findings

Interpretation of individual transcripts resulted in three super-ordinate themes: “feeling helpless and helpful in the system”, “transition to knowing” and “impact on self”. Each theme encapsulated a number of sub-themes depicting the limitations of services, difficult environments, making a difference, lack of understanding, developing understanding and the impact of these experiences on staff’s confidence, attitudes and well-being.

Practical implications

Criminal justice services are limited for people with autism. There is a lack of autism awareness by staff. Lack of awareness impacts staff attitudes and confidence. Training in autism should be provided to criminal justice staff.

Originality/value

This research highlights the limitations of services available for individuals with autism and the widespread lack of autism awareness. These concerns directly impacted participants’ confidence, attitudes and well-being. Recommendations are proposed to guide future practice and research including increasing availability of access to ASD services, enforcing mandatory autism-specific training for staff and routinely collecting service-user feedback.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

1 – 10 of 198