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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Bert H.J. Schreurs and Fariya Syed

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a comprehensive new recruitment model that brings together research findings in the different areas of recruitment. This model may serve…

3735

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a comprehensive new recruitment model that brings together research findings in the different areas of recruitment. This model may serve as a general framework for further recruitment research, and is intended to support Human Resource managers in developing their recruitment policy. To highlight its utility, how the model can be applied to describe the recruitment process of the military is exemplified.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is developed based on an extensive search for published studies on employee recruitment and on the efforts of the members of the NATO Task Group on Recruitment and Retention of Military Personnel.

Findings

The model proposes that individuals' cognitions (beliefs, perceptions, expectations) influence job pursuit behavior, via influencing job pursuit attitudes and intentions. Individuals' cognitions are shaped by information about job and organizational characteristics. Job/organizational information can be obtained from sources that are or are not under the direct control of the organization. Finally, several inter‐individual difference variables (e.g. values, needs) are proposed to moderate the relationships depicted in the model.

Originality/value

The model extends previous recruitment models through its integrated focus on both the applicant's and organization's perspective, its recognition of the multiphased nature of recruitment, and its applicability to real‐life recruitment contexts.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Machteld van den Heuvel, Evangelia Demerouti, Bert H.J. Schreurs, Arnold B. Bakker and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is first, to test the validity of a new scale measuring the construct of meaning‐making, defined as the ability to integrate challenging or ambiguous…

3875

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first, to test the validity of a new scale measuring the construct of meaning‐making, defined as the ability to integrate challenging or ambiguous situations into a framework of personal meaning using conscious, value‐based reflection. Second, to explore whether meaning‐making is distinct from other personal resources (self‐efficacy, optimism, mastery, meaning in life), and coping (positive reinterpretation, acceptance). Third, to explore whether meaning‐making facilitates work engagement, willingness to change, and performance during organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional survey‐data were collected from 238 employees in a variety of both public and private organizations.

Findings

Confirmatory factor analyses showed that meaning‐making can be distinguished from other personal resources, coping and meaning in life. Regression analyses showed that meaning‐making is positively related to in‐role performance and willingness to change, but not to work engagement, thereby partly supporting the hypotheses.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on meaning‐making that has not yet been studied empirically in organizational change settings. It shows that the new construct of psychological meaning‐making is related to valuable employee outcomes including in‐role performance and willingness to change. Meaning‐making explains variance over and above other personal resources such as self‐efficacy, optimism, mastery, coping and meaning in life.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Hetty van Emmerik, I.M. Jawahar, Bert Schreurs and Nele de Cuyper

Drawing on social capital theory and self‐identification theory, this study aims to examine the associations of two indicators of social capital, personal networks and deep‐level…

4994

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social capital theory and self‐identification theory, this study aims to examine the associations of two indicators of social capital, personal networks and deep‐level similarity, with team capability measures of team efficacy and team potency. The central focus of the study is to be the hypothesized mediating role of team learning behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using questionnaire data obtained from 221 teachers working in 33 teams and data were analyzed using multilevel analyses.

Findings

Consistent with the hypotheses, the results supported the contention that team learning behaviors mediate the relationship between different types of social capital and team efficacy and team potency. Specifically, it was found that, in highly (deep‐level) similar teams, the level of team learning behaviors is higher than in diverse teams, and this is hardly dependent on the extent of social capital based on personal networks. For diverse teams (i.e. teams scoring low on deep‐level similarity) more social capital based on personal networks translates into more team learning behaviors. Finally, it was found that team learning behaviors mediate the influence of social capital on team efficacy and team potency.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's findings suggest that it is important for managers not to focus exclusively on surface level characteristics but instead to attempt to facilitate the development of deep‐level similarity. Organizations can also encourage group social capital by allowing teams to develop a shared history, rather than change membership frequently, and by increasing contact among team members.

Originality/value

The paper examined exchange and identification processes that are important in generating resources to increase the development of team learning behaviors, thereby emphasizing the role of the interpersonal context for understanding how interaction processes between team members shape team learning behaviors and subsequently lead to more team efficacy and team potency.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

152

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Bert Schreurs, Angus Duff, Pascale M. Le Blanc and Thomas H. Stone

This article aims to provide prospective authors guidelines that will hopefully enable them to submit more competitive manuscripts to journals publishing careers research.

1294

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide prospective authors guidelines that will hopefully enable them to submit more competitive manuscripts to journals publishing careers research.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on their experience as an author, reviewer and editorial team member, the authors identify the main criteria that a quantitative study must meet to be considered for publication in international peer-reviewed journals covering career-related topics. They emphasize the importance of contributing to the careers literature and of designing the study in accordance with the research question.

Findings

Manuscripts are rejected because they are insufficiently innovative, and/or because sample, instruments and design are not appropriate to answer the research question at hand. Cross-sectional designs cannot be used to answer questions of mediation but should not be discarded automatically since they can be used to address other types of questions, including questions about nesting, clustering of individuals into subgroups, and to some extent, even causality.

Originality/value

The manuscript provides an insight into the decision-making process of reviewers and editorial board members and includes recommendations on the use of cross-sectional data.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Surendra Babu Talluri, Bert Schreurs and Nishant Uppal

Though the recent conceptualization of career sustainability, defining its indicators and dimensions prompted an important field of careers research, empirical research is still…

1416

Abstract

Purpose

Though the recent conceptualization of career sustainability, defining its indicators and dimensions prompted an important field of careers research, empirical research is still in its infancy. The current study empirically investigates how proactive personality, career adaptability and proactive career behaviors promote career sustainability based on the career construction model of adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a two-wave survey design to collect data from 414 full-time working professionals representing different organizations located in India. The authors tested the proposed hypotheses using structural equation modeling in IBM SPSS AMOS.

Findings

Results supported a serial indirect effect model with career adaptability and proactive career behaviors carrying the effect of proactive personality on career sustainability.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the emerging sustainable careers literature by unveiling the role of individual factors in career sustainability. Furthermore, the authors investigated these relationships through the complete career construction model of adaptation. By doing so, the current study contributes to careers literature by revealing the linkage between the career construction model of adaptation and career sustainability.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Bert Schreurs, Melvyn R.W. Hamstra, I.M. Jawahar and Jos Akkermans

The purpose of this study was to test the mediating role of relative deprivation in the relationship between perceived overqualification and counterproductive work behavior. In…

1574

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to test the mediating role of relative deprivation in the relationship between perceived overqualification and counterproductive work behavior. In addition to testing this mediation, the authors posited that ambition would interact with perceived overqualification to predict relative deprivation and, through it, counterproductive work behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 181 employees were analyzed using the SPSS macro PROCESS to test the proposed moderated mediation model.

Findings

Results indicated that perceived overqualification positively associated with perceptions of relative deprivation, which were, in turn, positively related to counterproductive work behavior. This indirect relationship gained in strength with increasing levels of ambition.

Originality/value

By modeling and measuring relative deprivation, this study offers a direct test of the often-invoked relative deprivation explanation of the implications of perceived overqualification for counterproductive work behavior. The study also shows how ambition can have unintended consequences.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2024

Mahsa Abedini, Bert Schreurs, I.M. Jawahar and Melvyn R.W. Hamstra

This research sought to examine the potential association between workers’ financial worry and counterproductive work behavior. Based on the basic psychological need theory, we…

Abstract

Purpose

This research sought to examine the potential association between workers’ financial worry and counterproductive work behavior. Based on the basic psychological need theory, we propose that psychological need satisfaction explains this relationship and we position this volitional pathway as an alternative to a cognitive capacity pathway based on the cognitive load theory.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a two-week interval-lagged survey study with three measurement points among 180 US workers. The mediation models were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results support the conclusion that, while cognitive capacity could have an impact on counterproductive work behavior, its mediating effect is less strong than that of need satisfaction.

Practical implications

Based on the results, we recommend that organizations design their compensation and benefits system to shield employees from financial worries. At the same time, we advise offering the employees who do experience financial worries assistance in managing their budgets and offering other forms of financial coaching.

Originality/value

This study is innovative because we show that the negative effects of financial worry extend much further than initially thought and affect not only employees' cognition but also their motivation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

I.M. Jawahar, Bert Schreurs and Shawn J. Mohammed

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member exchange–counterproductive…

1404

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member exchange–counterproductive work behavior (LMX–CWB) relationship. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the purpose of this paper is to test if occupational self-efficacy functions as a mediating mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance directed toward the supervisor. In addition, based on the conservation of resources theory, the paper investigates if supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure acted as a second-stage moderator of this mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two-wave time-lagged data from a sample of 189 high-tech professionals to test the hypotheses, controlling for age, sex, and trust.

Findings

The results of this paper showed that occupational self-efficacy carried the effect of LMX quality on counterproductive performance, but only for workers who have longer supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in proposing and testing a social cognitive mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance. As Johns (2017) advocated, the authors incorporated length of time, a contextual variable into this study by investigating supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure as moderating the proposed mediated relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 26