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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

James Richard, Geoff Plimmer, Kim-Shyan Fam and Charles Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between positive incentives (perceived organisational support) and negative incentives (publish or perish), on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between positive incentives (perceived organisational support) and negative incentives (publish or perish), on both academic publication productivity and marketing academics’ quality of life. While publish-or-perish pressure is a common technique to improve academics’ performance, its punishment orientation may be poorly suited to the uncertain, creative work that research entails and be harmful to academics’ life satisfaction and other well-being variables. In particular, it may interfere with family commitments, and harm the careers of academic women. While perceived organisational support may be effective in encouraging research outputs and be positive for well-being, it may be insufficient as a motivator in the increasingly competitive and pressured world of academia. These issues are important for individual academics, for schools wishing to attract good staff, and the wider marketing discipline wanting to ensure high productivity and quality of life amongst its members.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was developed and empirically tested using self-report survey data from 1,005 academics across five continents. AMOS structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings indicate that the most important determinants of publishing success and improved well-being of academics is organisational support rather than a “publish-or-perish” culture.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a self-report survey may have an impact (and potential bias) on the perceived importance and career effect of a “publish-or-perish” culture. However, current levels of the publish-or-perish culture appear to have become harmful, even for top academic publishers. Additional longitudinal data collection is proposed.

Practical implications

The challenge to develop tertiary systems that support and facilitate world-leading research environments may reside more in organisational support, both perceived and real, rather than a continuation (or adoption) of a publish-or-perish environment. There are personal costs, in the form of health concerns and work–family conflict, associated with academic success, more so for women than men.

Originality/value

This study is the first to empirically demonstrate the influence and importance of “publish-or-perish” and“perceived organisational support” management approaches on marketing academic publishing performance and academic well-being.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Alan N. Miller, Shannon G. Taylor and Arthur G. Bedeian

Although many in academe have speculated about the effects of pressure to publish on the management discipline – often referred to as “publish or perish” – prevailing…

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3400

Abstract

Purpose

Although many in academe have speculated about the effects of pressure to publish on the management discipline – often referred to as “publish or perish” – prevailing knowledge has been based on anecdotal rather than empirical evidence. The aim of the present paper is to shed light on the perceptions of management faculty regarding the pressure to publish imperative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed faculty in 104 management departments of AACSB accredited, research‐oriented US business schools to explore the prevalence, sources, and effects of pressure to publish.

Findings

Results indicate that pressure to publish affects both tenured and tenure‐track management faculty, although the latter, as a group, feel significantly more pressure than those who are tenured. The primary source of this pressure is faculty themselves who are motivated by the prospects of enhancing their professional reputation, leaving a permanent mark on their profession, and increasing their salary and job mobility. The effects of pressure to publish include heightened stress levels; the marginalization of teaching; and research that may lack relevance, creativity, and innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was intentionally restricted to faculty from management departments affiliated with research‐oriented US business schools and does not include faculty from departments that are less research‐oriented and, therefore, would be expected to put less pressure on their faculty to publish.

Practical implications

Although the effects of pressure to publish are not necessarily always negative, the paper offers some fundamental suggestions to management (and other) faculty who wish to mitigate the deleterious effects of pressure to publish.

Originality/value

Although the findings may not be surprising to more seasoned faculty, to the authors' knowledge this is the first time they have been documented in the published literature. As such, they advance discussions of “publish or perish” beyond mere conjecture and “shared myths” allowing management faculty to more rationally debate its consequences and their implications for academic life.

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Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Angela Repanovici

The purpose of this paper is to define the scientific production and productivity, and to present the main indicators for the measurement of the scientific activity. The…

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3808

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define the scientific production and productivity, and to present the main indicators for the measurement of the scientific activity. The impact of the research is to be measured and analyzed through citation analysis.

Design/methodology

This is an exploratory study made at the Transilvania University of Brasov to evaluate the research output of the faculty. The author analyzed the 2008 research performance as documented in its annual evaluation that states the number of papers, books, and research contracts. Using Publish or Perish, the author calculated the H‐index, G‐index, HC‐index and HI norm, of the 60 more‐productive professors. Correlation indicators are presented and the importance of open access tools and repositories for increasing the impact of scientific research is discussed.

Findings

The Publish or Perish software is an easy to use instrument for analyzing the impact of research. It calculates the impact of the researchers using the very visible resource, Google Scholar. Google Scholar has better indexing of proceedings and non‐English language material than ISI Web of Science but does not perform so well tracking citations from books and chapters of books.

Research limitations/implications

Authors' impact analysis and citations are not an assessment tool in Romanian universities, but it is commonly accepted that increasing research impact through more citations is one qualitative indicator.

Practical implications

It was suggested to the faculty that all professors have to be analysed with the same indicator. Further, Google Scholar and the H‐index obtained using Publish or Perish offer tools for assessing scientific research in a university and for evaluating professors.

Social implications

The results showed that an open access institutional repository would significantly add to the visibility of the university's scientific production.

Originality/value

The paper presents the methodology and the results of an exploratory study made at the Transilvania University of Brasov regarding the H‐Index of the academic staff. It analyzes the research performances achieved by Brasov academic community in 2008, as realised in its annual evaluation – number of papers, books, research contracts, etc. – by comparing the four indexes of those 60 professors with the best results.

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Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Péter Jacsó

The purpose of this paper is to is to discuss the results of recent experiments in calculating the h‐index and other bibliometric and scientometric indicators from Google…

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1763

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to is to discuss the results of recent experiments in calculating the h‐index and other bibliometric and scientometric indicators from Google Scholar with the Publish or Perish software.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the Publish or Perish (PoP) software and finds that is a swift and elegant tool to provide the essential output features that Google Scholar does not offer.

Findings

It is found that PoP allows the user to edit the result lists presented in a compact, efficient grid‐format. It facilitates the identification and removal of duplicate entries by offering dynamic sorting of the set by eight metadata elements, un‐checking items and instant recalculation of the indicators.

Originality/value

Some changes are recommended to enhance this useful utility by allowing users to clean and edit the erroneous entries in the result set, and then back‐load it to PoP for the recalculation of the indicators. It is also suggested that the option to upload into PoP the result lists produced in CSV format from Web of Science and Scopus (which have much more reliable and reproducible data than Google Scholar) should also be offered.

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Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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82

Abstract

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On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 1991

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-615-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Jairo Buitrago Ciro and Lynne Bowker

This is a comparative investigation of how university libraries in the United States, Canada and Spanish-speaking Latin America are responding to predatory publishing.

Abstract

Purpose

This is a comparative investigation of how university libraries in the United States, Canada and Spanish-speaking Latin America are responding to predatory publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings was used to identify the top ten universities from each of the US and Canada, as well as the top 20 Spanish-language universities in Latin America. Each university library's website was scrutinized to discover whether the libraries employed scholarly communication librarians, whether they offered scholarly communication workshops, or whether they shared information about scholarly communication on their websites. This information was further examined to determine if it discussed predatory publishing specifically.

Findings

Most libraries in the US/Canada sample employ scholarly communication librarians and nearly half offer workshops on predatory publishing. No library in the Latin America sample employed a scholarly communication specialist and just one offered a workshop addressing predatory publishing. The websites of the libraries in the US and Canada addressed predatory publishing both indirectly and directly, with US libraries favoring the former approach and Canadian libraries tending towards the latter. Predatory publishing was rarely addressed directly by the libraries in the Latin America sample; however, all discussed self-archiving and/or Open Access.

Research limitations/implications

Brazilian universities were excluded owing to the researchers' language limitations. Data were collected between September 15 and 30, 2019, so it represents a snapshot of information available at that time. The study was limited to an analysis of library websites using a fixed set of keywords, and it did not investigate whether other campus units were involved or whether other methods of informing researchers about predatory publishing were being used.

Originality/value

The study reveals some best practices leading to recommendations to help academic libraries combat predatory publishing and improve scholarly publishing literacy among researchers.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Xiang Ren

The purpose of this paper is to understand individual academics’ perception, attitudes and participation in Open Access Publishing and open scholarship and revisit some…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand individual academics’ perception, attitudes and participation in Open Access Publishing and open scholarship and revisit some principles and designs of openness in academic publishing from the perspective of creative end-users, which helps to increase the sustainability and efficiency of open models.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a case study of China and empirical data collected through semi-structured interviews with a wide range of academics and stakeholders.

Findings

A separation between the communication and certification functions of publishing is identified: open initiatives are valued for efficient and interactive communication while traditional publishing still dominates the legitimacy of research publications, which leads to the quandary of individual academics operating within the transitional landscape of scholarly communication.

Practical implications

Practical recommendations for sustainable and efficient openness are derived from discussions on the difficulties associated open/social certification and the shifting maxims that govern academics from “publish or perish” to “be visible or vanish”.

Originality/value

“Openness” is defined in broad sense integrating Open Access and open scholarship to comprehensively reflect individual academics’ views in the transitional landscape of academic publishing. The research findings suggest that new open approaches are needed to address the evolving tension and conflicts between communication and certification.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Péter Jacsó

This paper aims to discuss some caveats about the findings of Part 1 of the Royal Society's report from the perspective of the choice and reliability of the source base…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss some caveats about the findings of Part 1 of the Royal Society's report from the perspective of the choice and reliability of the source base, and the bibliometric and scientometric indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that the Royal Society's report gives too much emphasis to the growth rate of the publications of Chinese researchers when interpolating those data and forecasting that, within the decade and possibly as early as 2013, China will be ahead of even the USA in terms of the number of publications.

Findings

In an era when the “publish or perish” slogan is replaced by the “get cited or perish” mantra, the report barely discusses how much China is behind the world average and especially the above countries in terms of the most important scientometric indicators that take into account the productivity/quantity aspect and the citedness of publications as a proxy for quality.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that there are much better measures for the assessment of research activity than the one‐dimensional productivity numbers, such as the h‐index or the uncitedness rate, and the citations/publication rate where China is far below and the USA is far above the world average scores, and uses some charts to paint a more realistic picture of the scientific landscape.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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