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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Teresa D'Elia, Margaret Black, Barbara Carpio and John Dwyer

This commentary outlines the role and benefits of peer‐professional partnerships in developing and providing culturally competent health promotion services. There is evidence that…

316

Abstract

This commentary outlines the role and benefits of peer‐professional partnerships in developing and providing culturally competent health promotion services. There is evidence that both paid and voluntary peer leaders can effectively work with public health professionals, to increase reach, access and positive outcomes through culturally tailored interventions. This paper outlines many of the advantages of these partnerships for public health practice, while acknowledging some limitations and calls for a greater application and evaluation of peer‐professional models in preventative health services.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Calixto Gutiérrez-Braojos, Jesús Montejo-Gámez, Ana Eugenia Marín-Jiménez and Fátima Poza-Vilches

Knowledge-building (KB) pedagogy is a framework that promotes collective inquiry towards the continual resolution of knowledge problems that are relevant to a community (Bereiter…

Abstract

Knowledge-building (KB) pedagogy is a framework that promotes collective inquiry towards the continual resolution of knowledge problems that are relevant to a community (Bereiter & Scardamalia, 1993). Scardamalia (2002) proposes 12 principles to define KB pedagogy. The aim of this study is to provide a review that analyses the influences of these principles on empirical investigations on KB and the importance of technology in such investigations in order to understand the research trends on this pedagogy. The sample was selected from the most recent products published in the Web of Science database. The content analysis performed showed that researchers focussed mainly on the aspects related to a balanced distribution of knowledge and the improvement of ideas in a KB community. Results of this research suggest the addition of a sixth principle in KB pedagogy, that is, a technological principle. The latter highlights that KB is mediated by technology, which in turn facilitates communicating and sharing ideas within a community.

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Andrea Bertotti Metoyer

Data from the National Survey of Family Growth suggest that poor women and women of color are more likely than privileged women to use long-lasting contraception such as…

Abstract

Data from the National Survey of Family Growth suggest that poor women and women of color are more likely than privileged women to use long-lasting contraception such as sterilization, intrauterine devices (IUD), and Depo Provera. This disparity is noteworthy because long-lasting methods can and have been used coercively. To analyze this disparity, I constructed multivariate binary logistic regression models for female sterilization, IUD, and Depo Provera using the most recent National Survey of Family Growth available (Cycle 6, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) in 2002). I examined the effect of both personal factors, including age, parity, and number of marriages, and social factors, including education and health coverage. Personal factors were strong predictors but could not explain racial and economic disparities that exist among contraceptive users. This analysis found that education and health coverage were also important variables. Even controlling for personal factors, women with less education were more likely to be sterilized or use Depo Provera than women with a bachelor's degree or more. Women covered by Medicaid or public, government, or military coverage were more likely to use Depo Provera than women with private insurance. Women covered by Medicaid were also more likely to be sterilized since 2000. And uninsured women were more likely to use an IUD than women with private health insurance. However, none of the independent variables completely erased the effect of race and income, suggesting further research is necessary to understand the disparity in use of long-lasting contraceptives.

Details

Social Sources of Disparities in Health and Health Care and Linkages to Policy, Population Concerns and Providers of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-835-9

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Daniela Christen and Andreas Balthasar

Health monitoring of the migrant population in most European countries shows that migrants have a lower standard of health conditions than the resident population. One of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Health monitoring of the migrant population in most European countries shows that migrants have a lower standard of health conditions than the resident population. One of the problems is that the interaction between migrants and general practitioners (GPs) is not optimal. Most of the migrants are not able to fully understand the GP’s advice or instructions. GPs report that they are not adequately supported by health institutions, and they are asking for new solutions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review to find existing international approaches to improve the interaction between GPs and their migrant patients.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature search identified 2,387 articles, 36 of which met the full inclusion criteria. In total, 12 of the included studies referenced approaches for improving GPs’ communication skills. Seven articles described solutions for a better understanding of cultural differences, and six articles listed approaches to health education for GPs. One article highlighted how health information can improve the interaction between GPs and migrants, and four articles detailed new technologies that could improve and enhance quality of care. The last six articles included good practice strategies described by GPs.

Findings

This paper provides an overview of international approaches from the viewpoint of GPs. It concludes that there is no single instrument or method that works in all situations. There are, however, a wide range of approaches available that could lead to substantial improvements in the quality of care for the migrant population.

Research limitations/implications

Different health systems in the reviewed countries and changing roles of GPs must be taken into consideration when making statements about successful approaches. Migrants have different backgrounds and cannot all be categorized as one and the same group of patients. Another limitation of the review concerns the evidence level of the articles included, since most of the studies do not reach high level of evidence. In addition, there is a need to analyze aspects of the relationship between GPs and the migrant population that have been neglected up to now, such as financial issues, patients’ expectations, or lack of trust.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of international approaches from the viewpoint of GPs.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Lіubov Halkiv and Paweł Ziemiański

This paper aims to investigate whether paid work activity (PWA) experience of students from five emerging economies is related to academic results and self-assessment of possessed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether paid work activity (PWA) experience of students from five emerging economies is related to academic results and self-assessment of possessed entrepreneurial traits. Additionally, the authors verify the relationship between obtaining work experience and the willingness to start own business among students.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 3,631 students of the first level of higher education at six universities in five countries (Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine). A survey questionnaire was used which included questions on the previous work experience, paid work during university studies, the assessment of competencies related to entrepreneurship and the assessment of the desirability of entrepreneurship as a career choice.

Findings

Findings indicate that students who engaged in PWA before studies are more likely to do it during studies. PWA during studies is related to perceiving oneself as a worse-performing student, but also to the perception of oneself as an entrepreneurial person. No such relationship was found for the PWA experience before entering the university. It was also found that students are likely to start their businesses after obtaining work experience.

Practical implications

Practical implications pertain to the role of the contemporary academic institutions that should consider their approach to enabling students’ PWA and teaching them how to engage in it for the benefit of their own and the societies to which they belong. It is argued that it may be particularly essential in emerging economies.

Originality/value

The correlates of PWA of students have been underexplored. This paper allows broadening the current understanding of this phenomenon. The authors investigated its relationship with feeling entrepreneurial and academic achievements among young people from five emerging economies, which provides valuable insights for policymakers and educational institutions. It is argued that such insights may be particularly essential in emerging economies. Additionally, the authors contribute to advancing two theories that have not been extensively used in the entrepreneurial context: expectancy theory and social learning theory of career development.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Sara Benetti and Roy Zúñiga

This case is to familiarize students with the peculiarities of social enterprises (SEs). They would be able to recognize that SEs are hybrid organizations that merge a social…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case is to familiarize students with the peculiarities of social enterprises (SEs). They would be able to recognize that SEs are hybrid organizations that merge a social purpose with the managerial logics of business ventures. Because of this dual nature, social entrepreneurs need to balance their social aim and the financial viability of the project when analyzing different ways to grow the business, as well as understand and address internal tensions that arise because they have to deal with diverse stakeholders. At the end of the analysis, students would have clear that social and commercial ventures respond to different logics, and therefore, require different managerial models.

Case overview/synopsis

Andrea Meoño was the founder of Hope Home, a center for early childhood education in San José, Costa Rica. The goal of the center was to provide education and daily care to children of disadvantaged families, especially single mothers for whom it was a real challenge to maintain a permanent job to sustain their children, and at the same time, provide them with adequate care and attention. After five years of operating the center, Andrea had to figure out the best way to grow her business, ensuring financial sustainability while keeping true to her original purpose of helping vulnerable mothers by providing their children with excellent educational opportunities.

Complexity academic level

Master’s and Master of Business Administration students taking a course on social entrepreneurship.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

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