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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Placide Poba-Nzaou, Malatsi Galani, Sylvestre Uwizeyemungu and Arnela Ceric

This paper aims to explore the impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) on jobs.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) on jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors followed rapid review guidelines. The authors collected industry and government reports published prior and up to August 2017 in Google and Google Scholar using combination of key words: “job automation” or “work automation” with technology keywords: “artificial intelligence,” “machine learning,” etc. In total, 11 were included in this research.

Findings

The use of AI technologies will impact jobs in the near future as some job tasks are automated. AI is likely to substitute both, routine and nonroutine tasks. It is expected that humans and robots would work together in ways never imaginable. Changes in employability skills are expected. Because of the magnitude of these impacts on jobs, consulted reports call for concerted solutions that go beyond organizations’ and industry’s boundaries to include other relevant stakeholders. Moreover, organizations will have to rethink their human resource (HR) function to realign its expertise to the reality of AI.

Practical implications

In this context, the HR function will have to understand the dynamics that generate the impacts of these technologies in a workplace, to anticipate changes and actively contribute to creating an organizational environment that will facilitate the collaboration between human workers and complex digital agents, while ensuring compliance with labor and employment laws and supporting strategic organizational objectives.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the debate on ongoing concerns by providing a synthesis of relevant professional literature.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Arnela Ceric and Peter Holland

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of four cognitive biases, namely, selective perception, exposure to limited alternatives, adjustment and anchoring, and illusion…

1200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of four cognitive biases, namely, selective perception, exposure to limited alternatives, adjustment and anchoring, and illusion of control in anticipating and responding to Distributed-Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on exploratory case study research and secondary data on decision making in the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in regards to planning and managing DDoS attacks on Census day in 2016.

Findings

Cognitive biases limited the ABS’s awareness of the eCensus system’s vulnerabilities, preparation for and management of DDoS attacks. Cyberattacks are on the increase, and managers should expect and be prepared to deal with them.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the sensitivity of the topic, it was not possible to interview relevant stakeholders. Analysis is based on high-quality secondary data that includes comprehensive government reports investigating the events on Census day.

Practical implications

Cyberattacks are inevitable and not an aberration. A checklist of actions is identified to help organisations avoid the failures revealed in the case study. Managers need to increase their awareness of cyberattacks, develop clear processes for dealing with them and increase the robustness of their decision-making processes relating to cybersecurity.

Originality/value

This the authors believe that it is the first major study of the DDoS attacks on the Australian census. DDoS is a security reality of the twenty-first century and this case study illustrates the significance of cognitive biases and their impact on developing effective decisions and conducting regular risk assessments in managing cyberattacks.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Arnela Ceric

Little is known about actual organisational experiences and challenges with using e-HRM. The focus of this chapter is on the challenges that Australian HR professionals face in…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about actual organisational experiences and challenges with using e-HRM. The focus of this chapter is on the challenges that Australian HR professionals face in using e-HRM and achieving e-HRM outputs.

Methodology

Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with five HR professionals in different Australian organisations. Content analysis was applied to analyse the transcribed interviews.

Findings

Potential of e-HRM to bring efficiency, access to HR data, reporting, as well as contributions to the overall business strategy are thwarted by three groups of e-HRM challenges that HR professionals experience: e-HRM technical issues, HR issues, and e-HRM development issues.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on the five interviews with HR professionals in Australian organisations only. Line managers, employees, and managers from other business functions as well as small businesses have not been included in the research sample.

Practical implications

By addressing the e-HRM challenges, HR professionals can achieve e-HRM benefits and enhance their contribution to the overall business.

Originality/value

A major contribution is to show that the HRM literature barely considers the e-HRM challenges facing HR professionals. Another contribution is to provide an understanding of e-HRM challenges in the Australian context.

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Arnela Ceric

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of research on the applicability of resource-based theory (RBT) to the information systems (IS) area. In particular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of research on the applicability of resource-based theory (RBT) to the information systems (IS) area. In particular, the paper provides an understanding of the IS value creation process, and strategies for managing it by demonstrating the application of cross-impact analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

RBT and systems theory are adopted as a theoretical framework in this study. Cross-impact analysis is used as a method for investigating interactions among elements of an IS value creation system. These elements were identified through 22 semi-structured interviews with organisational stakeholders, and assessed in terms of direction and strength of their interactions, and depicted in a coordinate system.

Findings

The result of the analysis is a meaningful classification of elements in an IS value creation system as: levers, indicators, identities, buffers or trends, based on their position in the system. The results provide additional clarity and insights into the relationships between IS and organisational resources and their effect on IS value.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings have important implications for researchers and managers in terms of understanding the impact of interactions among IS and organisational resources on formulating successful strategies for managing the IS value creation system.

Originality/value

This study explores interactions among IS/information technology resources and organisational resources by using cross-impact analysis. It shows that interactions among the identified resources do have a major influence on the overall IS value creation system.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

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