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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Tanya Bondarouk, Huub Ruël, Elena Axinia and Roxana Arama

HR professionals have identified the power of information sharing for employer branding that could be obtained through the rapid growth of social media usage. The growing…

Abstract

Purpose

HR professionals have identified the power of information sharing for employer branding that could be obtained through the rapid growth of social media usage. The growing interest in and power of social media seem to be important for companies that want to make themselves known as interesting employers and to recruit prospective employees, using techniques that are more common to job seekers and recruiters. This study aims to explore the immediate future of employer branding through social media, as envisioned by academics and HR practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

To look into the future of employer branding, we use the Delphi technique for forecasting, planning, issue identification, and framework development (Bobeva & Day, 2002). Two groups of respondents participated in this three-part study: 11 academics and 20 HR professionals. They were selected because of their research into the integration of HRM and IT from the e-HRM Global mailing list. The panelists participated in the research via electronic communication. The data were collected in three rounds from November 2010 to April 2011.

Findings

Research has revealed differences in the opinions of academics and HR professionals on the impact of social media on employer branding. The academics see its general effect as the targeting of audience for recruitment, marketing/company brand, and ways of communication/HR competencies. The practitioners see the image of the employer, visibility of the company, and organization responsiveness. The study presents other findings within the boundaries of employer branding value proposition, internal and external marketing, and the role of HR professionals. According to the academics, HR professionals in the future will need to possess knowledge about marketing and communication studies and web-based applications/develop new skills. They think that social media will impact the image of HR in organizations. On the other hand, HR professionals think that the future of their activities will depend on their awareness of recruitment trends, HR innovative thinking, and HR networking skills. Although the object of their activity will remain recruitment, HR professionals will have to be continuously updated on what is new in the social media in terms of recruitment.

Originality/value

This study presents the results of the Delphi technique, which is itself considered an original research method and not widely accepted in the tough “publish or perish” world. The value of the research is its forecast about the future developments of employer branding through social media, as envisioned by academics and HR practitioners.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Placide Poba-Nzaou, Malatsi Galani and Anicet Tchibozo

This study aims to contribute to the old debate about the need for transformation of human resource (HR) professionals and HR services. It proposes the advent of people…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the old debate about the need for transformation of human resource (HR) professionals and HR services. It proposes the advent of people analytics as an unprecedented opportunity to support this transformation toward a more strategic positioning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper carried out a review of the use or willingness to use analytics by HR professionals.

Findings

Although HR professionals have been able to transform themselves over the years from a posture largely dominated by the administrative role, to one that includes compliance, the transformation remains insufficient considering the challenges faced by organizations. The advent of the fourth industrial revolution has put people back at the center of organizations’ concerns, but HR seems to be neither equipped nor ready to seize this unprecedented opportunity to play a more strategic role.

Originality/value

Transforming human resource management to fit Industry 4.0 is not a necessity, but a matter of survival for HR professionals.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Scott W. Lester and Dale J. Dwyer

The aim of this paper is to examine the motivations and benefits for pursuing or not pursuing the PHR and SPHR.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the motivations and benefits for pursuing or not pursuing the PHR and SPHR.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 1,862 participants, the study used multinomial logistic and hierarchical linear regression to test six hypotheses.

Findings

Participants pursuing SPHR were more likely to report intrinsic motivations pursuing certification, while PHR respondents were more likely to report extrinsic reasons. Other‐driven reasons were not significant predictors. Respondents not pursuing certification saw a lack of perceived benefits. Non‐pursuers of SPHR were concerned about time constraints. The pursuing and non‐pursuing groups did exhibit differences in their demographic and commitment profiles.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to only those professionals active in their local SHRM chapters. The data were cross‐sectional. Future research needs to address the validity of Human Resource Certification Institute (HRCI) certification and the lack of empirical research on the connection between certification and objective measures of job performance.

Practical implications

Results regarding perceived certification benefits suggest that organizations could run into retention problems if HR professionals continue to view marketability as the top benefit and view pay and promotion as unaffected by certification. The profiles of pursuers and non‐pursuers suggest that HRCI should target younger, less educated professionals when promoting the PHR and highlight increased marketability as the key benefit. Furthermore, HRCI should target those with high levels of affective commitment when promoting the SPHR.

Originality/value

The paper provides some of the first empirical evidence for why professionals pursue or do not pursue PHR and SPHR certification.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Tanya Bondarouk, Eline Marsman and Marc Rekers

The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Departing from the widely acknowledged HR competence studies of Ulrich and associates, we extended them with the continuous learning competence profile and HR professionals’ individual job performance. The empirical study is built on open interviews with HR leaders of ten large Dutch companies.

Findings

The study offers a new set of HRM competences. This set includes six HRM profiles: Business Focus, Learning Focus, Strategic Focus, HR Technology, HR Delivery, and Personal Credibility. Several contingency factors are thought to play a role in supporting these HRM competences: company culture, strategy, size, sector, scope, and position of HR professionals.

Practical Implications

Based on these contributions, we recommended conducting a quantitative study to gain understanding of the relevance of the individual HRM job performance and to find associations between the HRM competences and the individual HRM job performance.

Originality/Value

The focus of this chapter is a combination of HRM competences and the individual job performance of HR professionals.

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Daniela Isari, Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

Despite much rhetoric about the need to be strategic, HR professionals have often had difficulty in establishing themselves as credible contributors to organizational…

Abstract

Despite much rhetoric about the need to be strategic, HR professionals have often had difficulty in establishing themselves as credible contributors to organizational performances, facing a legitimacy issue in their relationship with line managers. Adopting a social cognitive theory framework, the present study explores the HR professionals’ perceptions and expectations of the changing roles that HR professionals and line managers could play in a near future scenario where a set of smart technologies will be applied to HRM.

The research design is based on a two-wave survey: it involves 53 HR professionals belonging to the HR department of the Italian branch of one of the biggest international consulting companies which is about to implement a wide digital transformation.

Preliminary findings prompt reflections into the role of digital practices in reshaping the relationship between the HR department and line managers, especially in consideration of the role of HR professionals’ technology readiness and tenure. They suggest that HR devolution is not a matter of “all or nothing,” but it requires different solutions, which also depend on the nature of the specific HR practice. From a managerial perspective, the chapter suggests the paramount importance of sustaining the digital mindset of the HR professionals and their professional image.

Details

HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Dave Ulrich and Joe Grochowski

This paper aims to define the four basic organization design choices for HR, discuss the need to align the HR organization with the business organization, explore how to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define the four basic organization design choices for HR, discuss the need to align the HR organization with the business organization, explore how to organize to turn HR knowledge into client productivity, and clarify the role of HR and how HR roles work together.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on over 100 interviews and discussions with senior HR professionals in over 50 Global 500 organizations across all industry sectors.

Findings

The next evolution in the organization of the HR department is the professional services model. HR can learn and adapt the professional services model to turn HR expertise and knowledge into client productivity and line manager value.

Originality/value

This article provides HR professionals with practical advice on how to organize the HR department. It offers five useful steps to help HR shift from a shared services organizational model to a professional services model so that HR can turn knowledge into value.

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Moira Bailey

The purpose of this paper is an investigation into the experiences of professional development of human resource (HR) practitioners in the North of Scotland, and the use…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is an investigation into the experiences of professional development of human resource (HR) practitioners in the North of Scotland, and the use of non-formal learning in that development.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth semi-structured interviews from a purposively selected sample of HR practitioners were conducted. Data from these interviews was analysed on a phenomenographic basis, to discover the qualitatively different ways in which HR practitioners describe, experience, understand and analyse their professional development and the use of non-formal learning in that development.

Findings

What emerged from the analysis were two sets of categories of description, one for each of the phenomena. An outcome space for each of the phenomena emerged, illustrating the hierarchical relationship within each set of categories of description as well as the dimensions of variation relating to the phenomena. These outcome spaces represent the collective experience of the practitioners on the subjects of professional development and non-formal learning.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size and the specific geographical area are acknowledged as limitations. Another factor which may be considered a limitation is that the author's position as an HR lecturer with a keen interest in the subject could lead to this being considered an “insider” study. All these factors are acknowledged. These have been mitigated against by the careful preparation undertaken during the research process which resulted from the author's awareness of these limitations.

Originality/value

This study has given a voice to the HR practitioners in the North of Scotland with regard to their experiences and attitudes towards their professional development and the role of non-formal learning in that development. This study gives employers, other practitioners and professional bodies an opportunity to learn from the practitioners themselves as to how they can help practitioners in terms of their development.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Moira Bailey

The aim of this paper is to explore the role of relevant policies in the professional development of HR practitioners in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the role of relevant policies in the professional development of HR practitioners in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature was carried out on the subject of the role of relevant policies in the professional development of HR practitioners in the UK. In doing so, the issues of profession and professionalism in the context of the HR occupation were explored.

Findings

The paper highlights the importance of HRD in the improvement of HR practitioners’ practice, and as a result, enhancing the status of the occupation.

Research limitations/implications

A number of areas which are potentially worthy of further empirical investigation have been identified as a result of the review in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance of policy and changing working environments on professional practice. It illustrates the importance of HRD on improving that practice and suggests the use of informal learning mechanisms as a cost effective means of going some way to achieve that improvement.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is its contribution to the discussion on professional development in the context of the HR occupation.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Jon Younger, Aaron Younger and Nate Thompson

The aim of this paper is to explore the importance and development of HR consulting and change management skills.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the importance and development of HR consulting and change management skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the results of a study of HR consulting and change management skills, and the practical application of consulting and change management skills through professional education combined with action learning in a major global corporation.

Findings

The HR professionals in the study, drawn from a wide range of organizations, industries and geographies, tend to have a much higher level of confidence in their consulting and change management skills than the line managers who participated in this research.

Originality/value

In addition to pointing out specific areas where consulting and change management skills need to be improved, the paper demonstrates the value of increased skills through a case example of the impact of improving HR professional consulting and change skills in a top European‐based and global energy company. Following the review of this initiative and its impact, the paper identifies specific practical steps and methods for increasing HR consulting and change management effectiveness.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Aoife McDermott and Mary Keating

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the HR function in the management of professional and non‐professional staff in the acute hospital sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the HR function in the management of professional and non‐professional staff in the acute hospital sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted. Empirical data from three hospital case studies is utilised to explore the role of the hospital HR function. Cases were compiled from 45 interviews, observation and secondary data analysis.

Findings

The paper finds that in two of the three cases the human resource (HR) function predominantly provides services to non‐professional workforce groups. However, the effective and strategic management of professionals is undertaken in the third case, without a professional HR function.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper require some caution in extrapolation, being based on research in one national context. The authors suggest the delivery of service as a useful lens to explore the enacted practice of HRM in hospitals.

Practical implications

The paper draws attention to a significant deficit in the role of the HR function in managing core professional staff.

Originality/value

The paper applies an existing conceptual framework to explore the role of the HR function in hospitals. It identifies a significant deficit in the management of core professional staff. On this basis the paper suggests alternative research methodologies to investigate the management of all hospital staff.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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