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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2010

Chih Sin, Nina Mguni, Chloe Cook, Natasha Comber and Annie Hedges

The fear and experience of violence, harassment and abuse of those with learning disabilities are significant barriers to full social inclusion. The patchy evidence base and the…

Abstract

The fear and experience of violence, harassment and abuse of those with learning disabilities are significant barriers to full social inclusion. The patchy evidence base and the confusing, and sometimes contradictory, array of policy and legislative instruments hamper efforts to tackle the issues. This article draws on the findings from an extensive review of literature looking into disabled people's experiences of targeted violence, harassment and abuse. The review found that people with learning disabilities and/or mental health conditions are at higher risk, and experience greater levels, of violence, harassment and abuse, not only than non‐disabled people but also than other disabled people. Situational vulnerabilities mean that the probability and experience of violence, harassment and abuse are due not simply to any inherent characteristics of those with learning disabilities. Under‐reporting and lack of appropriate response and support from criminal justice agencies compromise access to justice. People with learning disabilities are also found to have a propensity to report to third parties instead of to criminal justice agencies. However, the evidence points to lack of joined‐up working in various agencies, which hampers efforts at redress. There are particular concerns over a vacuum of responsibility as a result of confusion about the No Secrets guidance.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Chih Sin, Nina Mguni, Chloe Cook, Natasha Comber and Annie Hedges

This article draws on findings from an extensive review of literature conducted as part of a wider project on disabled people's experience of violence, harassment and abuse. In…

Abstract

This article draws on findings from an extensive review of literature conducted as part of a wider project on disabled people's experience of violence, harassment and abuse. In addition to under‐reporting, disabled people tend to report incidents to a third party rather than to the police. Physical, procedural, and attitudinal barriers discourage disabled people from reporting to the criminal justice system. The relationship between the victim and the perpetrator can also throw up significant challenges to reporting. Disabled people may accept that these incidents are ‘part of everyday life’. There is an implementation gap in relation to current legislative tools that can facilitate a disabled person to seek redress.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Chih Sin, Ayesha Janjua, Annie Hedges, Chloe Cook and Joanna Sloman

The National Health Service Breast Screening Programme set up 20 years ago in the UK has to evolve continuously to meet changing needs as a result of fundamental transformations…

Abstract

The National Health Service Breast Screening Programme set up 20 years ago in the UK has to evolve continuously to meet changing needs as a result of fundamental transformations in the age and ethnic profile of the population. This article draws on evidence generated as part of the Healthcare Commission's national study aimed at identifying issues that may contribute to different groups not having equal access to, experience of, or outcomes from services relating to breast screening and breast cancer treatment. Findings indicate that ethnicity has an effect on the awareness of services and of breast cancer. Access to screening and the experience of screening and treatment are influenced by the interaction of ethnicity with age. Younger women from certain black and minority ethnic groups face particular barriers. There can be additional barriers experienced by those from linguistic minorities. Equality of access, experience and outcomes does not mean treating everyone the same way.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

Chih Hoong Sin, Annie Hedges, Chloe Cook, Nina Mguni and Natasha Comber

This paper aims to discuss the sensible management of risk for disabled people, which can turn into disproportionate steps to attempt to completely eliminate risk, leading to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the sensible management of risk for disabled people, which can turn into disproportionate steps to attempt to completely eliminate risk, leading to diminished opportunities across life. Instincts to protect are heightened in the context of disabled people as potential victims of targeted violence and hostility. Individual‐, organisational‐ and systemic‐level responses can often be orientated towards protection and/or the minimisation of risk rather than towards providing access to justice and effective redress.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on evidence generated through a literature review, interviews with disabled people and interviews with representatives from a number of key organisations.

Findings

For many disabled people, incidents can be persistent and ongoing. Common responses by disabled victims include avoidance and/or acceptance strategies. They are also advised by those around them and by agency staff they come in contact with to ignore perpetrators or to avoid putting themselves at risk. Criminal justice agencies may be more concerned about a victim's disability than about taking action to provide access to justice and effective redress. The protectionistic approach underpinning much of policy, legislation and guidance can be at odds with the positive promotion of disability equality.

Originality/value

The paper examines the need to move away from a protectionist paradigm to a rights‐based paradigm. It calls for a more inclusive approach where disabled people are involved meaningfully in the process of risk management and in other decisions around combating targeted violence and hostility against them.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

344

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Charlotte Cobb-Moore

Purpose – This chapter examines an episode of pretend play amongst a group of young girls in an elementary school in Australia, highlighting how they interact within the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines an episode of pretend play amongst a group of young girls in an elementary school in Australia, highlighting how they interact within the membership categorization device ‘family’ to manage their social and power relationships.

Approach – Using conversation analysis and membership categorization analysis, an episode of video-recorded interaction that occurs amongst a group of four young girls is analyzed.

Findings – As disputes arise amongst the girls, the mother category is produced as authoritative through authoritative actions by the girl in the category of mother, and displays of subordination on the part of the other children, in the categories of sister, dog and cat.

Value of paper – Examining play as a social practice provides insight into the social worlds of children. The analysis shows how the children draw upon and co-construct family-style relationships in a pretend play context, in ways that enable them to build and organize peer interaction. Authority is highlighted as a joint accomplishment that is part of the social and moral order continuously being negotiated by the children. The authority of the mother category is produced and oriented to as a means of managing the disputes within the pretend frame of play.

Details

Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-877-9

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Annie Daly

There is a pressing need to teach students how to talk critically about race to understand the personal and political implications of racism in the contemporary US society…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a pressing need to teach students how to talk critically about race to understand the personal and political implications of racism in the contemporary US society. Classroom race talk, however, often includes moments of discomfort or confusion as teachers and students navigate new norms for making sense of race and racism. The purpose of this paper is to examine how one white teacher and her multiracial class of fourth-grade students navigated race talk tensions while reading and discussing shared texts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this paper were collected as part of a larger, year-long qualitative study on antiracist pedagogy. In this paper, the author analyzes video data of classroom race talk recorded during whole-class and small-group literacy lessons. Using inductive coding and reconstructive critical discourse analysis, the author examines how the teacher and students co-constructed meaning during tense or confusing conversational moments.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that the teacher and students jointly mediated tensions by using the practices of racial literacy, which included learning about the history of racial inequality in the USA, considering racism as structural and systemic rather than individual and asking and answering questions for continued inquiry and critical self-reflection. While previous research studies have characterized race talk tensions as problems or obstacles to student learning, the findings from this study suggest that tensions can be generative to developing and enacting racial literacy.

Originality/value

In the current political climate, alarmist rhetoric issued by conservative politicians and media outlets has discredited race talk as harmful or damaging to children. This study offers a positive reframing of tensions, which may provide teachers encouragement to pursue literacy instruction that equips students with knowledge and skills to better understand and confront racism.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2016

Bryan G. Cook and Christina Keaulana

Reading fluency, which is critical for developing reading comprehension, is a fundamental skill in both school and life. However, many students with learning and behavioral…

Abstract

Reading fluency, which is critical for developing reading comprehension, is a fundamental skill in both school and life. However, many students with learning and behavioral disabilities are disfluent readers. To improve reading performance for these learners, educators should implement practices shown by reliable research to cause improved reading fluency. In this chapter, following a discussion of reading fluency and its importance, we describe two instructional practices that educators might use to improve students’ reading fluency: colored filters and repeated reading. The research on the colored filters is, at best, inconclusive, whereas the research literature suggests that repeated reading is an effective practice. To bridge the gap between research and practice and improve the reading fluency of students with learning and behavioral disabilities, educators and other stakeholders should prioritize the use of research-based practices (e.g., repeated reading) but avoid practices without clear research support (e.g., colored filters).

Details

Instructional Practices with and without Empirical Validity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-125-8

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Susan Frelich Appleton and Susan Ekberg Stiritz

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation…

Abstract

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation of a transdisciplinary course, entitled “Regulating Sex: Historical and Cultural Encounters,” in which students mined literature for social critique, became immersed in the study of law and its limits, and developed increased sensitivity to power, its uses, and abuses. The paper demonstrates the value theoretically and pedagogically of third-wave feminisms, wild zones, and contact zones as analytic constructs and contends that including sex and sexualities in conversations transforms personal experience, education, society, and culture, including law.

Details

Special Issue: Feminist Legal Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-782-0

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Case study
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Craig Lowman, Mikael Samuelsson and Geoff Bick

The learning outcomes of this paper are as follows: to critically assess and analyse public and private funding options and determine which private option is best suited to a…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this paper are as follows: to critically assess and analyse public and private funding options and determine which private option is best suited to a company (finance – decision-making). To calculate the internal rate of return (IRR) of a project (finance – analytical). To critically assess the underlying structures of traditional and new industries (Strategy/BMI – analytical). To analyse the challenges and disruption potential of intermediated industries (Strategy/BMI – analytical).

Case overview/synopsis

The Triggerfish case looks at how films are funded in South Africa. The company is currently funding films mostly through government channels, but CEO Stuart Forrest would prefer to independently and privately fund their projects. The case looks at what returns can be expected by investors in film through the “recoupment waterfall” – the means whereby the producers and investors of a film recoup their investments and earn returns. The investment horizons of select private lenders (bank, mezzanine financiers, risk financers and venture capital firms) and public funders are explored. The case also explores the impact that video-on-demand platforms, such as Netflix and Disney+, is having on the traditional models of filmmaking.

Complexity academic level

This teaching case is aimed at postgraduate business students such as Master’s degrees in Business Administration degrees, postgraduate diplomas, executive education or specialist Master’s degrees.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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