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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Andrew Kirk, Kevin Armstrong, Niina Nurkka and Annette Jinks

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive practice…

1366

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive practice and if this impacts on paramedic practice and clinical care.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited from English and Finnish ambulance services that have similar organisational and professional scopes of practice. The aim was to gain insight into the similarities and differences between the countries regarding the existence of a blame culture in paramedic practice. Semi-structured focus groups and interviews involving 20 English and Finnish paramedics were undertaken. Qualitative perceptions concerning the reality of a blame culture in paramedic practice and its impact on professional roles were sought.

Findings

Three major themes that were identified in the thematic analysis included: blame culture and its influences; the impact of complaints against paramedics; and the use of defensive practice within their roles. These data themes were similar for both groups of participants. The majority of participants thought the healthcare blame culture to be widespread and believed that this was likely to directly influence paramedics’ working practices.

Originality/value

Whilst the impact of blame culture and complaints on the medical profession has previously been examined, this study makes an important contribution by exploring the factors that impact on paramedics’ lives and their practice, within two European countries. The inappropriate use of social media by some members of the public in both countries was a disturbing issue for many participants and was identified as an area for further research.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Annette Jinks, Sue English and Anne Coufopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in‐depth quantitative and qualitative evaluation of a family‐based weight loss and healthy life style programme for clinically obese…

1072

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in‐depth quantitative and qualitative evaluation of a family‐based weight loss and healthy life style programme for clinically obese children in England.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed method case study evaluation used included obtaining pre and post measurements of anthropometry and a range of attitude and behavioural attributes. The qualitative phase of the study involved in‐depth interviews and focus groups.

Findings

The programme is demanding and resource intensive and designed as an intervention for children needing most help with their weight. Participants included the families of five referred children (n=18 individuals) and the intervention team (n=7). All but one child had reduced BMI centiles at the end of the programme. There were also improvements to a number of self‐report aspects of healthy eating and levels of activity and quality of life, self‐esteem and levels of depression indicators. The qualitative evaluation generated a number of insightful data themes.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the case study design and small sample numbers. Also weight loss is an important indicator of any weight management programme's success however the short length of time programme was run is a barrier to seeing any substantive changes in any of the participating children's weights.

Practical implications

The evaluation conducted gives insights into the positive aspects of the programme and can inform development of similar programmes.

Originality/value

There are few examples of in‐depth and comprehensive quantitative and qualitative approaches used to evaluate this type of intervention.

Details

Health Education, vol. 113 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Annette Jinks and Susan Linnell

The purpose of the study is to undertake a formative evaluation of a young person's Smokebuster club and to examine how young people's experience of being a club member can be…

1055

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to undertake a formative evaluation of a young person's Smokebuster club and to examine how young people's experience of being a club member can be used to inform the club's future development.

Design/methodology/approach

After seeking and being granted Local Research Ethics Committee approval to undertake the study a postal survey was conducted of all the Smokebusters members (n=2810).

Findings

The response rate achieved was 16 per cent (n=438). Quantitative data analysis showed that the majority of club members who responded to the survey were white, non‐disabled females, aged between 13‐14 years old. The majority of young people surveyed said they had “never smoked and never will” (70.3 per cent, n=308). However, over 6 per cent (n=28) of the young people surveyed said they “currently smoke but would like to give it up”. A wealth of qualitative data was also obtained that gives useful information on how the young people surveyed thought club provision could be improved.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are thought to be useful not only for future development of the Smokebuster club that is the focus of this evaluation but also for those who organise similar clubs. The findings are also of wider relevance to professionals engaged in smoking cessation initiatives for young people.

Originality/value

The value of this paper relates to issues surrounding engaging undertaking young people in such evaluation. Also reports of Smokebuster club evaluations are rarely given in the literature and therefore the findings of this study augment this limited information.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Annette M. Jinks and Ruth Daniels

Addresses the workplace health concerns of employees at an Acute Hospital Trust. The research conducted utilised a focus group methodology to investigate the health concerns of…

2901

Abstract

Addresses the workplace health concerns of employees at an Acute Hospital Trust. The research conducted utilised a focus group methodology to investigate the health concerns of multidisciplinary groups of health care workers (n=27). The findings indicate that the concern for the majority was workplace stress. Stressors that were identified as important to the groups were, for example, the nature of the work they were undertaking, staffing levels, volume of the work, management styles and their work environments. Health promotion and prevention topics such as motivation and health status, smoking, alcohol and drug misuse, nutrition and weight control and physical exercise were seen of subsidiary concern. Limitations of the study are given. Future research in the subject area is identified.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Paresh Wankhade and DeMond S. Miller

321

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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