Search results

1 – 10 of 12
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Judith Sixsmith, Mei Lan Fang, Ryan Woolrych, Sarah L. Canham, Lupin Battersby and Andrew Sixsmith

The provision of home and community supports can enable people to successfully age-in-place by improving physical and mental health, supporting social participation and…

Downloads
1374

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of home and community supports can enable people to successfully age-in-place by improving physical and mental health, supporting social participation and enhancing independence, autonomy and choice. One challenge concerns the integration of place-based supports available as older people transition into affordable housing. Sustainable solutions need to be developed and implemented with the full involvement of communities, service organizations and older people themselves. Partnership building is an important component of this process. The purpose of this paper is to detail the intricacies of developing partnerships with low-income older people, local service providers and nonprofit housing associations in the context of a Canadian housing development.

Design/methodology/approach

A community-based participatory approach was used to inform the data collection and partnership building process. The partnership building process progressed through a series of democratized committee meetings based on the principles of appreciative inquiry, four collaboration cafés with nonprofit housing providers and four community mapping workshops with low-income older people. Data collection also involved 25 interviews and 15 photovoice sessions with the housing tenants. The common aims of partnership and data collection were to understand the challenges and opportunities experienced by older people, service providers and nonprofit housing providers; identify the perspectives of service providers and nonprofit housing providers for the provision and delivery of senior-friendly services and resources; and determine actions that can be undertaken to better meet the needs of service providers and nonprofit housing providers in order to help them serve older people better.

Findings

The partnership prioritized the generation of a shared vision together with shared values, interests and the goal of co-creating meaningful housing solutions for older people transitioning into affordable housing. Input from interviews and photovoice sessions with older people provided material to inform decision making in support of ageing well in the right place. Attention to issues of power dynamics and knowledge generation and feedback mechanisms enable all fields of expertise to be taken into account, including the experiential expertise of older residents. This resulted in functional, physical, psychological and social aspects of ageing in place to inform the new build housing complex.

Research limitations/implications

The time and effort required to conduct democratized partnerships slowed the decision-making process.

Originality/value

The findings confirm that the drive toward community partnerships is a necessary process in supporting older people to age well in the right place. This requires sound mechanisms to include the voice of older people themselves alongside other relevant stakeholders. Ageing well in a housing complex requires meaningful placemaking to include the functional, physical, psychological and social aspects of older people’s everyday life in respect to both home and community.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Andrew Sixsmith

This paper aims to provide an overview of the emerging AgeTech sector and highlight key areas for research and development that have emerged under COVID-19, as well as…

Downloads
867

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the emerging AgeTech sector and highlight key areas for research and development that have emerged under COVID-19, as well as some of the challenges to real-world implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a commentary on emerging issues in the AgeTech sector, with particular reference to COVID-19. Information used in this paper is drawn from the Canadian AGE-WELL network.

Findings

The COVID-19 pandemic has particularly impacted older adults. Technology has increasingly been seen as a solution to support older adults during this time. AgeTech refers to the use of existing and emerging advanced technologies, such as digital media, information and communication technologies (ICTs), mobile technologies, wearables and smart home systems, to help keep older adults connected and to deliver health and community services.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the potential of AgeTech, key challenges remain such as structural barriers to larger-scale implementation, the need to focus on quality of service rather than crisis management and addressing the digital divide.

Practical implications

AgeTech helps older adults to stay healthy and active, increases their safety and security, supports independent living and reduces isolation. In particular, technology can support older adults and caregivers in their own homes and communities and meet the desire of most older adults to age in place.

Social implications

AgeTech is helpful in assisting older adults to stay connected. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the importance of the informal social connections and supports within families, communities and voluntary organizations.

Originality/value

The last months have seen a huge upsurge in COVID-19-related research and development, as funding organizations, research institutions and companies pivot to meet the challenges thrown up by the pandemic. This paper looks at the potential role of technology to support older adults and caregivers.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Martin Beer, Sharon Green, Gillian Armitt, Johanna van Bruggen, Ramon Daniels, Ludo Ghyselen, Jan Sandqvist and Andrew Sixsmith

Describes a new and experimental initiative to provide Internet‐based courses to student and professional occupational therapists in four centres in the UK, Belgium, The…

Abstract

Describes a new and experimental initiative to provide Internet‐based courses to student and professional occupational therapists in four centres in the UK, Belgium, The Netherlands and Sweden. The basis of this collaborative Occupational Therapy Internet School (OTIS) is the concept of the “Virtual College”. The aim is to support and facilitate the whole range of educational activities within a remote electronic environment. A major feature of the course organisation is the adoption of a problem‐based approach in which students will collaborate internationally to propose effective intervention in given case study scenarios. Outlines the rationale for OTIS, the content and structure of the courseware, the technical specification of the system and evaluation criteria. In addition to the more conventional Web‐based learning facilities generally offered, a number of agent‐based approaches are being adopted to assist in the management of the course by ensuring the proper delivery of course materials and to assist the functioning of project groups.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Andrew Sixsmith, Ryan Woolrych, Rebecca Schonnop, Stephen Robinovitch, Habib Chaudhury and Fabio Feldman

Despite the growing area of research involving falls in the residential care setting, the link between contextual and environmental factors in falls is poorly understood…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing area of research involving falls in the residential care setting, the link between contextual and environmental factors in falls is poorly understood. This paper aims to draw upon existing research being undertaken in long-term care (LTC) in Metro Vancouver, Canada, with a particular focus on identifying contextual factors contributing to fall events.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a qualitative observational analysis of video-captured data collected through a network of high-quality video systems in two LTC facilities. The research comprised workshops involving experienced researchers who reviewed six video sequences of fall events. The outcome of the workshops was a written narrative summarizing the discussion and researchers’ interpretation of fall sequences.

Findings

The analysis indicates that there are a broad range of environmental, behavioral and situational factors that contribute to falls in LTC. This suggests that a limited conceptualization of a fall as an outcome of the person's impairment and environmental hazards fails to convey the complexity of potential contributory factors typical of most fall incidents.

Research limitations/implications

Broadening our understanding of falls provides the potential to make recommendations for falls prevention practice across multiple levels, including the individual, social and organizational context.

Originality/value

The paper evaluates the potential of video-based data in fall analysis and points to the development of a case study approach to analyzing fall incidents to capture the complex nature of contributory factors beyond research that focuses solely on intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Sheena Wyllie and Val Gains

Barchester Healthcare's Memory Lane Communities programme is gaining recognition for its standards in specialist care for people with dementia. In this article, Sheena…

Abstract

Barchester Healthcare's Memory Lane Communities programme is gaining recognition for its standards in specialist care for people with dementia. In this article, Sheena Wyllie and Val Gains explain the company's philosophy, which recognises that every person is an individual. It is practised by staff who undergo training in Barchester's bespoke dementia care programme, which places the family at the heart of the process of understanding the person with dementia.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Judith Torrington

Two projects in the EQUAL programme explore aspects of the influence of building design on the quality of life of people with dementia. Design in Caring Environments…

Abstract

Two projects in the EQUAL programme explore aspects of the influence of building design on the quality of life of people with dementia. Design in Caring Environments (DICE) examined the quality of life of people in residential care homes in relation to building design features. INDEPENDENT (Investigating Enabling Environments for People with Dementia) is a current project with the aim of developing technologies to enhance quality of life by supporting enjoyable activities. One aspect of INDEPENDENT is an exploration of the interaction between spatial settings and meaningful activity, to highlight factors that support and enable activity and to identify barriers. Findings from both projects suggest that a more creative approach to the management of buildings would enhance the well‐being of residents; under‐use of facilities is common. Meaningful space that supports activity is therapeutic but spaces that give confused messages are common in buildings used by older people. Tools to evaluate buildings have a potential role in the long‐term management of facilities to help identify underused spaces, spatial confusion and barriers to activity. Quality of life was shown to be poorer in buildings that prioritise safety and health; buildings that support activity positively by providing good assistive devices, giving people control of their environment and affording good links with the community have a positive association with well‐being.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2010

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Peter Elwood

Downloads
151

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Jafar Nejadali

Regenerative flow pumps are dynamic machines with the ability to develop high heads at low flow rates. Simplicity, compactness, stable features and low manufacturing costs…

Abstract

Purpose

Regenerative flow pumps are dynamic machines with the ability to develop high heads at low flow rates. Simplicity, compactness, stable features and low manufacturing costs make them interesting for many applications in industries. The purpose of this study is to present a new method for calculating the flow through regenerative pumps with bucket form blades to predict the performance curves by a cheap and easy-to-use way.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was carried out based on the geometric shape of a fluid particle trajectory in a regenerative turbomachine. The fluid particle path was assumed to be a helix wrapped into a torus. Loss models were considered and the results of predictions were compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data.

Findings

The overall trend of performance curves resulted from presented model looked consistent with CFD data. However, there were slight differences in high and low flow coefficients. The results showed that the predicted geometric shape of the flow path with the presented model (a helix wrapped into a torus) was not consistent with CFD results at high flow coefficients. Due to the complexity and turbulence of the fluid flow and errors in the calculation of losses, as well as slip factor, there was a discrepancy between the results of the presented model and numerical simulation, especially in high and low flow coefficients.

Originality/value

The analysis was carried out based on the geometric shape of a fluid particle trajectory in a regenerative turbomachine with bucket form blades. The fluid particle path was assumed to be a helix wrapped into a torus.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Chukwuma Ukoha and Andrew Stranieri

This paper aims to use the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin to reveal new insights into the role and impact of social media in health-care settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin to reveal new insights into the role and impact of social media in health-care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

With the help of Bakhtin’s constructs of dialogism, polyphony, heteroglossia and carnival, the power and influences of the social media phenomenon in health-care settings, are explored.

Findings

It is apparent from the in-depth analysis conducted that there is a delicate balance between the need to increase dialogue and the need to safeguard public health, in the use of social media for health-related communication. Bakhtin‘s constructs elucidate this delicate balance and highlight the need for health-care providers that use social media to find the right balance between these competing communicational priorities.

Originality/value

This paper advances a nascent theoretical approach to social media research. By applying Bakhtinian ideas to consumer health informatics, this paper has the potential to open a new approach to theorizing the role of social software in health-care settings. Stakeholders in digital health will find this paper useful, as it opens up dialogue to further discuss the role of social media in health care.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12