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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Iñigo Flores Ituarte, Sergei Chekurov, Jukka Tuomi, Julien Etienne Mascolo, Alessandro Zanella, Patrick Springer and Jouni Partanen

Additive manufacturing requires a systemic approach to help industry on technology applicability research. Towards this end, the purpose of this research is to help…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing requires a systemic approach to help industry on technology applicability research. Towards this end, the purpose of this research is to help manufacturing business leaders decide whether digitalised manufacturing based on additive manufacturing are suitable for engineering applications and help them plan technology transfer decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on case study research and action research, involving a mix of quantitative and qualitative research methods. The empirical part involved the study of the fatigue life of industrial component manufactured by laser sintering as well as a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to define a strategic decision-making.

Findings

Laser-sintered plastic materials are suitable in end use automotive applications, especially when there are multiple product variations. Fatigue life of the tested coupling meets the design requirements. Additionally, production of mechanical parts can be substituted by additive methods while digitalising the manufacturing process to gain productivity, especially when there is a need for mass-customisation.

Research limitations/implications

This research relies on a single case study research. The application used is unique and its technical empirical data cannot be transferred directly to other applications.

Practical implications

Industry practitioners can use this research to shed light on technology transferability challenges considering technical feasibility of additive polymer materials, economic aspects as well as strategic implications for implementing digitalised manufacturing methods based on additive manufacturing.

Originality/value

This research presents a combined study of technical and strategic factors for additive manufacturing transferability using an industrial mass-customisation case as an example. In addition, a new cost comparison model is presented including the impact of geometry variations.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

John Mortimer

The automotive industry has been the principal driver in the development of robotics; however, as car design becomes more sophisticated, demands on robot makers will…

Abstract

The automotive industry has been the principal driver in the development of robotics; however, as car design becomes more sophisticated, demands on robot makers will continue undiminished.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

John Mortimer

Describes how Jaguar Cars is evaluating a technology roadmap to assess future manufacturing processes.

Abstract

Purpose

Describes how Jaguar Cars is evaluating a technology roadmap to assess future manufacturing processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the major production line technologies that are under close scrutiny for the next ten years for use in the Jaguar Cars' production plants at Castle Bromwich and at Halewood, Merseyside, both in the UK. Technologies under review include ultrasonic welding, friction stir spot welding, laser welding and self‐piercing rivets.

Findings

The use of self‐piercing rivets is already used in production at Jaguar for the aluminium‐bodied XJ saloon. But developments of the process are already underway in readiness for the next new model. However, at the same time, engineers are examining other techniques including ultrasonic joining and friction stir spot welding, both of which at the subject of research work in the US and the UK. Use of pedestal guns and blow feeding devices is expected to bring improvements in cost.

Research limitations/implications

Engineers at Jaguar are carrying out research and development, both in‐house and with various research bodies and universities to establish the most beneficial processes for the joining of aluminium sheet, extrusion and cast components that go to form an aluminium car body. For successful joining aluminium requires low heat input solutions. At present, self‐piercing rivets offer the best solution, but Jaguar engineers are looking at other processes including ultrasonic joining and friction stir spot welding. The aim is to find processes that are fast and cost‐effective. In the meantime, Jaguar will continue to use self‐piercing rivets for aluminium structures.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the work will lead to reduced cycle times which in turn will help to make the manufacture of aluminium car bodies more cost‐effective.

Originality/value

BMW claims it is the first car maker to make use of bowl‐feeding self‐piercing rivets for the manufacture of aluminium body‐in‐white.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Siddharth Kulkarni, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Parn, Craig Chapman, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Richard Cornish

Vehicle weight reduction represents a viable means of meeting tougher regulatory requirements designed to reduce fuel consumption and control greenhouse gas emissions…

Abstract

Purpose

Vehicle weight reduction represents a viable means of meeting tougher regulatory requirements designed to reduce fuel consumption and control greenhouse gas emissions. This paper aims to present an empirical and comparative analysis of lightweight magnesium materials used to replace conventional steel in passenger vehicles with internal combustion engines. The very low density of magnesium makes it a viable material for lightweighting given that it is lighter than aluminium by one-third and steel by three-fourth.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural evaluation case study of the “open access” Wikispeed car was undertaken. This included an assessment of material design characteristics such as bending stiffness, torsional stiffness and crashworthiness to evaluate whether magnesium provides a better alternative to the current usage of aluminium in the automotive industry.

Findings

The Wikispeed car had an issue with the rocker beam width/thickness (b/t) ratio, indicating failure in yield instead of buckling. By changing the specified material, Aluminium Alloy 6061-T651 to Magnesium EN-MB10020, it was revealed that vehicle mass could be reduced by an estimated 110 kg, in turn improving the fuel economy by 10 per cent. This, however, would require mechanical performance compromise unless the current design is modified.

Originality/value

This is the first time that a comparative analysis of material substitution has been made on the Wikispeed car. The results of such work will assist in the lowering of harmful greenhouse gas emissions and simultaneously augment fuel economy.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

John Mortimer

Describes how Jaguar Cars in the UK is using robots to manufacture aluminium car bodies for its new XK sports car that is being built in the company's plant in Castle Bromwich, UK.

Abstract

Purpose

Describes how Jaguar Cars in the UK is using robots to manufacture aluminium car bodies for its new XK sports car that is being built in the company's plant in Castle Bromwich, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the major production line techniques that are used in the manufacture of the body‐in‐white structure. These include self‐piercing rivets (SPRs), self‐tapping screws, MIG welding and adhesives.

Findings

The use of SPRs and self‐tapping screws are proving essential in the joining of aluminium components manufactured as extrusions, castings and pressings.

Research limitations/implications

The introduction of SPRs and self‐tapping screws, adhesive bonding and MIG welding of cosmetic aluminium skin panels is the result of considerable research work on the part of Jaguar engineers and the company's suppliers, as well as Warwick University. Three of these techniques require the services of robots with their integrated controls. This work is likely to continue in order to reduce cycle times and improve overall product performance, both to the benefit of manufacturer and end‐user – the customer. This paper provides a unique insight into the development of a facility with islands of automation to produce aluminium body shells.

Practical implications

It is likely that arising out of development work into new techniques, processes and standards that will be used throughout the Ford organization, including other companies that form the Premier Automotive Group. Aston Martin, Land Rover and Volvo could all benefit from the technologies developed at Jaguar Cars.

Originality/value

This is the first time Jaguar Cars has used ABB robots in significant numbers to apply SPRs and self‐tapping screws to join aluminium components. ABB robots are also used for body shell inspection and MIG welding aluminum skin panels.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Cornelius Ogbodo Anayo Agbo

It is of concern that several attempts at making Nigeria an automobile producing country have not yielded much success. This paper aims to re-examine the history of…

Abstract

Purpose

It is of concern that several attempts at making Nigeria an automobile producing country have not yielded much success. This paper aims to re-examine the history of automobile manufacturing and the consequences of auto policies of successive governments towards having a viable automotive industry in Nigeria and the lessons therefrom.

Design/methodology/approach

Dispersed data were assembled from both primary and secondary sources on the automobile industry activities in Nigeria. The historic data cover Nigeria’s vehicles need, production levels, importations and local content developments. Time series data on Nigeria’s crude oil prices and the devaluation of the local currency were obtained and analyzed to elucidate effects and provide the trajectory. A comparative analysis of the policies of successful countries with initial status with Nigeria was carried out to elucidate the policy pitfalls in Nigeria’s industrial policies.

Findings

The automotive policies in Nigeria are not self-sustaining. It has been curiously observed that the automotive policy on import substitution and local content development approach did not include the key components in automobile manufacturing, making it a footloose industry. Nigeria’s crude petroleum mono-economy affects the manufacturing sector negatively. A fall in international crude oil price causes free fall of the country’s currency in the international market, the cost of imported new vehicles and parts become prohibitively high, consequently, individuals, as well as corporate organizations, resorted to imported fairly used vehicles and parts for their transportation needs. Capacity utilization dropped abysmally.

Originality/value

Nigeria’s experience has demonstrated the critical role the government can play in safeguarding the automobile industry in the developing economies. Apart from diversification of the economy, there is a need, therefore, for a more refined and pragmatic approach in the formulation of policies to enable only genuine investors to operate in the automobile industry which hitherto has been an all-comers affair with many taking advantage of unguarded and unguided government incentives.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Jaroslav Mackerle

This paper gives a review of the finite element techniques (FE) applied in the area of material processing. The latest trends in metal forming, non‐metal forming, powder…

Abstract

This paper gives a review of the finite element techniques (FE) applied in the area of material processing. The latest trends in metal forming, non‐metal forming, powder metallurgy and composite material processing are briefly discussed. The range of applications of finite elements on these subjects is extremely wide and cannot be presented in a single paper; therefore the aim of the paper is to give FE researchers/users only an encyclopaedic view of the different possibilities that exist today in the various fields mentioned above. An appendix included at the end of the paper presents a bibliography on finite element applications in material processing for 1994‐1996, where 1,370 references are listed. This bibliography is an updating of the paper written by Brannberg and Mackerle which has been published in Engineering Computations, Vol. 11 No. 5, 1994, pp. 413‐55.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

John Mortimer

With the trend towards lightweight body structures for automobiles, new joining technologies are evolving. This paper highlights the latest application – that of adhesive…

Abstract

With the trend towards lightweight body structures for automobiles, new joining technologies are evolving. This paper highlights the latest application – that of adhesive bonding major components for the Aston Martin DB9 sports car.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

J. Lantairès, B.C. Waterfield, H. Binner, G. Griffiths and Maurice Wright

ISHM invites papers for the above Conference, to be held on 29–31 May 1991 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Papers should cover areas such as: design, manufacturing…

Abstract

ISHM invites papers for the above Conference, to be held on 29–31 May 1991 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Papers should cover areas such as: design, manufacturing, packaging and interconnection, materials and processing, applications, reliability, components, new technologies, marketing and economics, optoelectronics. Summaries should be in English, length 200–300 words. The deadline for receipt of summaries is 30 September 1990. (For full details, see announcement on pp. 54–55.)

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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