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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Alistair Morrison

Skillchange instruction methodology (SIM), a new design approach,is outlined. A systematic approach is obviously needed and thisdevelopment methodology shows how it can…

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Abstract

Skillchange instruction methodology (SIM), a new design approach, is outlined. A systematic approach is obviously needed and this development methodology shows how it can work in practice. SIM has three phases: feasibility, training and the support phase. Provides guidelines to ensure the materials remain current.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

79

Abstract

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Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

43

Abstract

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

56

Abstract

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

122

Abstract

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Heidi Hanson and Zoe Stewart-Marshall

402

Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Rebecca Strating

This chapter examines narratives and representations of rural Australia deployed by political actors. At both federal and state levels in Australia, political parties tend…

Abstract

This chapter examines narratives and representations of rural Australia deployed by political actors. At both federal and state levels in Australia, political parties tend to focus their attention on metropolitan electorates in their public discussions, particularly during election campaigns. This has led to accusations from minor parties and independents that rural areas are ignored by governments based in capital cities. The Nationals, for example, presents itself as the party whose primary motivation is to protect the interests of rural voters. Rural sites are political spaces shaped by particular types of narrative and rhetoric. Engaging with how the ‘rural’ is represented through rhetoric and image is useful for understanding how crime is positioned. This chapter uses rhetorical political analysis and representation to understand how political ideas about rurality are expressed through language and imagery. The political context outlined in this chapter is one factor that affects the nature and complexities of rural crime and responses to it. Rural Australia is at its own political crossroad, reflected in the emergence of competing narratives for the bush, defined here as a contest between ‘rural centrism’ and ‘rural populism’.

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Wilson Irvine and Alistair R. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of information communication technology (ICT) in small rural hospitality businesses. Although ICT is often presented as a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of information communication technology (ICT) in small rural hospitality businesses. Although ICT is often presented as a means of reducing the impact of being rural, little is known about the extent or level of use of ICT. This paper addresses these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to gather and analyse data. The study had two stages: an initial survey to determine the extent and pervasion of ICT; and a second interview stage to explore the role and applications of ICT.

Findings

The authors find that 84 per cent of the businesses use ICT effectively, mainly to provide information and improve service quality. In addition, some firms had adopted very successful methods of using the internet for sales and marketing but ignored supply functions. The authors were surprised to find that ICT was seen as a way of enhancing personal service and that rather than a barrier, it was seen to promote quality of service. Moreover the respondents did seem to have used ICT effectively to overcome the disadvantages of location and rurality.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was carried out in a single rural environment and this limits its generalisability. Nonetheless, the study develops some interesting issues about the application of ICT in the rural context.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the benefits derived from the enthusiasm of some rural business owners. They had recognised the efficacy of computing and can provide lessons in how to apply ICT to overcome distance.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a gap in research and offers some insights into the application of ICT in rural areas.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Sana El Harbi, Alistair R. Anderson and Meriam Amamou

– The research aims to ask whether, in the absence of overarching innovative conditions, a small firm can have an innovative culture and what its scale and scope is.

1048

Abstract

Purpose

The research aims to ask whether, in the absence of overarching innovative conditions, a small firm can have an innovative culture and what its scale and scope is.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs four exploratory case studies. This methodological choice is justified in that a case study approach allows the use of the existing literature without inhibiting the detection of any unique characteristics in the Tunisian context. This context of a developing economy is likely to be different from established economies.

Findings

The study finds evidence of a learning environment within the firms and a good fit with the concepts of an innovative culture. Internal knowledge sharing is evident for all companies. However, this culture faces inwards, so that the paucity of linkages and weak socialisation combines with institutional thinness to isolate the firms. Local competitive advantages are not amplified but rather are dampened by the relative absence of interaction.

Research limitations/implications

Most research about innovation in the ICT sector is conducted in the context of developed countries. This paper shows the specificities and uniqueness of innovation culture in the context of a developing country.

Practical implications

The findings imply that despite recent improvements, Tunisia lacks many of the regional “institutions” that produce the synergic benefits of an innovative milieu.

Originality/value

The context of a developing country is novel. The value of the findings may, however, be extended to other similar countries. This is important given the role of ICT in “catching up”.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Wilson Irvine and Alistair R. Anderson

This paper reports on the quintessential rural small firm, the tourist service provider and explores the impact of the recent foot and mouth outbreak. A theoretical…

6510

Abstract

This paper reports on the quintessential rural small firm, the tourist service provider and explores the impact of the recent foot and mouth outbreak. A theoretical framework is employed which proposes that many rural small firms capture and commodify the values that are inherent in the countryside. Part of this process is the portrayal of image and is an essential element of the new economy of signs and symbols. This image was critically challenged during the outbreak and thus affords us a unique opportunity to examine what happens, the impacts and effects, on small rural business when the image is tarnished. The findings show that small firms in rural areas suffered badly, even in areas where there was no disease. This leads one to argue that the effects of the disease were generated, less by fact, and more by the production of image. However, it was also found that rural small firms were extremely flexible in their responses to the crisis. In turn this seems to suggest that many small rural businesses may have a particular resilience which augurs well for sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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