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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Annemaree Lloyd and Alison Hicks

The purpose of this second study into information literacy practice during the COVID-19 pandemic is to identify the conditions that influence the emergence of information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this second study into information literacy practice during the COVID-19 pandemic is to identify the conditions that influence the emergence of information literacy as a safeguarding practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research design comprised one to one in-depth interviews conducted virtually during the UK's second and third lockdown phase between November 2020 and February 2021. Data were coded and analysed by the researchers using constant comparative techniques.

Findings

Continual exposure to information creates the “noisy” conditions that lead to saturation and the potential for “information pathologies” to act as a form of resistance. Participants alter their information practices by actively avoiding and resisting formal and informal sources of information. These reactive activities have implications for standard information literacy empowerment discourses.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to the UK context.

Practical implications

Findings will be useful for librarians and researchers who are interested in the theorisation of information literacy as well as public health and information professionals tasked with designing long-term health promotion strategies.

Social implications

This paper contributes to our understandings of the role that information literacy practices play within ongoing and long-term crises.

Originality/value

This paper develops research into the role of information literacy practice in times of crises and extends understanding related to the concept of empowerment, which forms a central idea within information literacy discourse.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Annemaree Lloyd and Alison Hicks

The aim of this study is to investigate people's information practices as the SARS-CoV-2 virus took hold in the UK. Of particular interest is how people transition into…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate people's information practices as the SARS-CoV-2 virus took hold in the UK. Of particular interest is how people transition into newly created pandemic information environments and the ways information literacy practices come into view.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research design comprised one-to-one in-depth interviews conducted virtually towards the end of the UK's first lockdown phase in May–July 2020. Data were coded and analysed by the researchers using constant comparative and situated analysis techniques.

Findings

Transition into new pandemic information environments was shaped by an unfolding phase, an intensification phase and a stable phase. Information literacy emerged as a form of safeguarding as participants engaged in information activities designed to mitigate health, legal, financial and well-being risks produced by the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

Time constraints meant that the sample from the first phase of this study skewed female.

Practical implications

Findings establish foundational knowledge for public health and information professionals tasked with shaping public communication during times of crisis.

Social implications

This paper contributes to understandings of the role that information and information literacy play within global and long-term crises.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore information practices during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Alison Hicks

Information literacy has been consistently undertheorised. The purpose of this paper is to contribute in the ongoing theorisation of information literacy by exploring the…

Abstract

Purpose

Information literacy has been consistently undertheorised. The purpose of this paper is to contribute in the ongoing theorisation of information literacy by exploring the meaning and implications of the emergent grounded theory of mitigating risk for information literacy research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The grounded theory was produced through a qualitative study that was framed by practice theory and the theoretical constructs of cognitive authority and affordance, and employed constructivist grounded theory, semi-structured interviews and photo-elicitation methods to explore the information literacy practices of language-learners overseas.

Findings

This paper provides a theoretically rich exploration of language-learner information literacy practices while further identifying the importance of time, affect and information creation within information literacy research and practice as well as the need for the continued theorisation of information literacy concepts.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s constructivist grounded theorisation of information literacy remains localised and contextualised rather than generalisable.

Practical implications

The paper raises questions and points of reflection that may be used to inform the continued development of information literacy instruction and teaching practices.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an increasingly sophisticated theoretical conceptualisation of information literacy as well as forming a basis for ongoing theoretical development in the field.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Alison Hicks

The purpose of this paper is to present the emergent grounded theory of mitigating risk, which was produced through an analysis of the information literacy practices of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the emergent grounded theory of mitigating risk, which was produced through an analysis of the information literacy practices of English-speakers who are learning a language overseas as part of their undergraduate degree.

Design/methodology/approach

The grounded theory emerges from a qualitative study that was framed by practice theory and transitions theory, and employed constructivist grounded theory, semi-structured interviews and photo-elicitation methods to explore the information activities of 26 language-learners from Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA.

Findings

The grounded theory of mitigating risk illustrates how academic, financial and physical risks that are produced through language-learner engagement overseas catalyse the enactment of information literacy practices that enable students to mediate their transition overseas.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s theory-building is localised and contextual rather than generalisable.

Practical implications

The grounded theory broadens librarians’ and language-educators’ knowledge of student activities during immersive educational experiences as well as extending understanding about the shape that information literacy takes within transition to a new intercultural context.

Social implications

The grounded theory develops understanding about the role that local communities play within intercultural transition and how these groups can respond to and prepare for increasingly fluid patterns of global movement.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an increasingly sophisticated theoretical conceptualisation of information literacy while further providing a detailed exploration of transition from an information perspective.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Alison Hicks and Alison Graber

This paper seeks to re‐conceptualize Web 2.0 tools within the intellectual and theoretical frameworks currently driving changes in academic learning communities and to…

3022

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to re‐conceptualize Web 2.0 tools within the intellectual and theoretical frameworks currently driving changes in academic learning communities and to explore the effect of this paradigm shift on academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores an intellectually rather than technologically driven definition of Web 2.0 and its potential effect on teaching and learning in libraries. Reflections are based on paradigm shifts in learning theories implicit in the adoption and implementation of Web 2.0 technologies. The paper also discusses applications of Web 2.0 designed to improve student and faculty engagement in the research process.

Findings

The paper encourages librarians to think beyond the technology and to consider how Web 2.0 can support intellectual teaching and learning objectives in an academic library.

Practical implications

The paper discusses applications of Web 2.0 designed to improve student and faculty engagement in the research process.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into rethinking current conceptions of Web 2.0 based on participation in and collaboration with faculty during a summer institute session. It provides a common conceptual framework of teaching and learning theory for librarians to use when implementing Web 2.0 tools and applications.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Alison Hicks

The need for IT (Information Technology) and information skills training has been revisited by a new approach to clinical decision‐making in the National Health Service…

371

Abstract

The need for IT (Information Technology) and information skills training has been revisited by a new approach to clinical decision‐making in the National Health Service (NHS): evidence based practice. The Trent Institute for Health Services Research supports NHS staff in the Trent region either wishing to implement evidence based practice or to undertake research of their own by providing advice and training. A range of courses providing training in research skills has been developed. Included in this range are four half‐day information skills courses, developed by the Information Resources section of the Trent Institute: Literature Searching, Health information on the Internet, Introducing the Cochrane Library and Sources for clinical effectiveness. Aims and objectives for each course have been developed to facilitate the development of course materials and the evaluation of training. Evaluation questionnaires are completed by course participants and at the time of writing (November 1997), response has been positive. The information collected is being used to plan future courses for the next academic year, such as Training the Trainers courses.

Details

Program, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Glenda M. Insua

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which first-year writing course guides contain instructional content and whether the ACRL Framework for information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which first-year writing course guides contain instructional content and whether the ACRL Framework for information literacy has been addressed in these guides.

Design/methodology/approach

First-year writing course guides were identified from American Research Libraries websites and examined for instructional elements. These elements were categorized using a rubric that mapped the Framework to instructional content. Qualtrics was used to organize and analyze the data.

Findings

Most first-year writing course guides include instructional content, but less than half incorporate the Framework in some way. Guides that do incorporate the Framework focus on “searching as strategic exploration” and “research as inquiry”.

Practical implications

This paper provides librarians with practical information on first-year writing guides and includes examples of how the Framework might be addressed.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on research guide content and is the first to invent first-year writing course guides.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Bronwen K. Maxson, Michelle E. Neely, Lindsay M. Roberts, Sean M. Stone, M. Sara Lowe, Katharine V. Macy and Willie Miller

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and writing-intensive courses. It explores connections to critical pedagogy, sociocultural theory, open educational practices and high-impact practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for implementing the three scenarios discussed in the paper differs widely. All approaches include some form of student feedback through focus groups, exit surveys or end-of-class assessments.

Findings

In both library and writing program settings, students have experience with and a favorable opinion of peer-assisted learning strategies.

Practical implications

These case studies provide concrete examples of how to develop different types of peer teaching interventions. The cases also detail benefits as well as challenges to implementation.

Social implications

Providing opportunities for peers to lead through teaching others has the potential to boost an individual’s sense of confidence, leadership and improve their own learning, as well as give students’ experiences to build upon and apply to their everyday lives and future careers.

Originality/value

While peer teaching is widely implemented in many disciplines, such as science, technology, engineering and medicine, its adoption in academic libraries has sometimes been viewed as controversial. This case study adds to the body of literature demonstrating that peer teaching is possible and desirable.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Jutta Haider, Veronica Johansson and Björn Hammarfelt

The article introduces selected theoretical approaches to time and temporality relevant to the field of library and information science, and it briefly introduces the…

Abstract

Purpose

The article introduces selected theoretical approaches to time and temporality relevant to the field of library and information science, and it briefly introduces the papers gathered in this special issue. A number of issues that could potentially be followed in future research are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review a selection of theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of time that originate in or are of particular relevance to library and information science. Four main themes are identified: (1) information as object in temporal perspectives; (2) time and information as tools of power and control; (3) time in society; and (4) experiencing and practicing time.

Findings

The paper advocates a thorough engagement with how time and temporality shape notions of information more broadly. This includes, for example, paying attention to how various dimensions of the late-modern time regime of acceleration feed into the ways in which information is operationalised, how information work is commodified, and how hierarchies of information are established; paying attention to the changing temporal dynamics that networked information systems imply for our understanding of documents or of memory institutions; or how external events such as social and natural crises quickly alter modes, speed, and forms of data production and use, in areas as diverse as information practices, policy, management, representation, and organisation, amongst others.

Originality/value

By foregrounding temporal perspectives in library and information science, the authors advocate dialogue with important perspectives on time that come from other fields. Rather than just including such perspectives in library and information science, however, the authors find that the focus on information and documents that the library and information science field contributes has great potential to advance the understanding of how notions and experiences of time shape late-modern societies and individuals.

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Geoff Walton, Matthew Pointon, Jamie Barker, Martin Turner and Andrew Joseph Wilkinson

The purpose of this paper is to determine to what extent a person’s psychophysiological well-being is affected by misinformation and whether their level of information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine to what extent a person’s psychophysiological well-being is affected by misinformation and whether their level of information discernment has any positive or negative effect on the outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n = 48) were randomly and blindly allocated to one of two groups: control group participants were told a person they were working with was a student; experimental group participants were additionally led to believe that this other participant had extreme religious views. This was both stigmatising and misinforming, as this other person was an actor. Participants completed a pre-screening booklet and a series of tasks. Participants’ cardiovascular responses were measured during the procedure.

Findings

Participants with high levels of information discernment, i.e. those who are curious, use multiple sources to verify information, are sceptical about search engine information, are cognisant of the importance of authority and are aware that knowledge changes and is contradictory at times exhibited an adaptive stress response, i.e. healthy psychophysiological outcomes and responded with positive emotions before and after a stressful task.

Social implications

The findings indicate the potential harmful effects of misinformation and discuss how information literacy or Metaliteracy interventions may address this issue.

Originality/value

The first study to combine the hitherto unrelated theoretical areas of information discernment (a sub-set of information literacy), affective states (positive affect negative affect survey) and stress (challenge and threat cardiovascular measures).

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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