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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2023

Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Albert Ahenkan, James Kwame Mensah and Alexander Preko

In the space of slums are many stakeholders; the extent to which their assistance contributes to slum administration is sparsely studied. The study aims to examine how external…

Abstract

Purpose

In the space of slums are many stakeholders; the extent to which their assistance contributes to slum administration is sparsely studied. The study aims to examine how external stakeholders contribute to slum administration within the Ghanaian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the stakeholder theory, the study used an exploratory qualitative design based on face-to-face, in-depth interviews among 21 respondents. Participants were purposively selected from stakeholder organisations and slum residents based on the stake in slums governance in Ghana.

Findings

The results indicate that stakeholders have contributed towards slums livelihoods in the general areas of housing, trading, skill development and capacity building. It shows that stakeholders’ contributions tend to enhance slums’ living conditions and affect local assemblies positively. The study finds that slum dwellers categorise stakeholders’ contributions as short-term relief and long-term solutions. Additionally, it emerged that in the areas of policy design, implementation and policy feedback, external stakeholders have supported the government in that regard.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusion drawn from the study is limited to the four communities and the stakeholder organisations. However, communities with similar characteristics globally might benefit from the findings.

Practical implications

The study uncovers a context-specific role and assistance of external stakeholders in the domain of slums. This provides a guide to the government regarding key areas of stakeholder collaboration towards slum governance in the Ghanaian context. Theoretically, this study has contributed to new knowledge about stakeholders’ contribution to the overall governance of slums.

Originality/value

The study expands the frontiers of knowledge in the field of slum administration by focusing on external stakeholders. This study departs from previous studies, which have examined, in broader perspectives, stakeholders’ roles within the space of slums.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2023

Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Albert Ahenkan, James Kwame Mensah and Alexander Preko

The study examined the influence of slums on policies affecting the slums' lives in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined the influence of slums on policies affecting the slums' lives in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative approach based on in-depth interviews (IDIs) was used to select 24 respondents using purposive and snowball sampling techniques.

Findings

The findings show that slum dwellers have an adequate understanding of policies that affect the dwellers' lives. Furthermore, slum dwellers use statutory, technological, media and right-to-vote-based strategies to influence government policies. This also indicates that implemented policies do not align with realities in the slums

Research limitations/implications

The outcome of this study cannot be generalised to represent the whole population of slums due to the inherent limitations associated with a qualitative design

Social implications

This study uncovers context-specific strategies through which slum residents influence policies. The study concedes that policy actors involve the slums in policies that affect their livelihoods

Originality/value

The results are unique not only to developing countries, but are also useful to other economies with similar characteristics.

Details

Open House International, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2022

Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Albert Ahenkan, James Kwame Mensah and Alexander Preko

Slum discourse has attracted significant research interest among scholars. The study examined the policy framework for slum governance in Ghana with the goal of offering…

Abstract

Purpose

Slum discourse has attracted significant research interest among scholars. The study examined the policy framework for slum governance in Ghana with the goal of offering recommendations to structure slum management.

Design/methodology/approach

Anchored on exploratory qualitative methodology, the study utilized a purposive sampling technique to select 18 respondents from the major ministries for in-depth interviews.

Findings

The results showed an absence of a central national policy for slum governance because slums development has received less national priority. It also revealed a lack of coordination among the sector ministries in policy formulation, which tends to create a blame game among them. Further, it was found that slum programs are driven by media-political and non-governmental actors.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusion and the outcome of this study cannot be generalized as to represent the whole ministries in Ghana in the space of slums management due to the qualitative approach. A recommendation is offered for the creation of a separate authority to take charge of the slums in Ghana.

Practical implications

This study elucidates a context-specific understanding of the policy framework for slum governance, which tends to shape public knowledge and policy landscape.

Originality/value

As a novelty, the findings of the study advanced the sparse literature in the domain and, at the same time, helped politicians and policymakers understand the need for a dedicated policy for slums.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Issah Justice Musah-Surugu, Albert Ahenkan, Justice Nyigmah Bawole and Samuel Antwi Darkwah

The much-trumpeted Green Climate Fund and several other official financial mechanisms for financing adaptation to climate change under the UN Framework Convention on Climate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The much-trumpeted Green Climate Fund and several other official financial mechanisms for financing adaptation to climate change under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change have fallen short in meeting adaptation needs. Many poorer people are still grappling with the scourge of climate change impacts. Consequently, there has been a dominant research focus on climate change financing emanating from official development assistance (ODA), Adaptation Fund, public expenditure and private sector support. However, there has been little attempt to examine how migrants’ remittances can close adaptation financing gaps at the local level, ostensibly creating a large research gap. This paper aims to argue that migrants’ remittances provide a unique complementary opportunity for financing adaptation and have a wider impact on those who are extremely vulnerable to climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is aligned to the qualitative research approach. Both secondary and primary data acquired through interviews and focus group discussions were used for the study. Multiple sampling methods were also used to select the respondents.

Findings

The findings show that remittances are used to finance both incremental costs of households’ infrastructure and consumption needs, as well as additional investment needs to be occasioned by ongoing or expected changes in climate.

Originality/value

In the wake of dwindling government/public revenue, ODA and poor commitment of Annex II countries to fulfil their financial obligations, the study makes the following recommendations: First, the financial infrastructure underpinning money transfers in both sending and recipient countries should be improved to make transfers attractive. Second, significant steps should be taken to reduce the fees on remittance services, especially for the small transfers typically made by poor migrants. Finally, adequate climatic information should be made available to local people to ensure that remittances are applied to the right adaptation option to avoid maladaptation.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Albert Ahenkan, Emmanuel Senior Tenakwah and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly as well as the challenges faced by the Assembly in…

2119

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly as well as the challenges faced by the Assembly in implementing its performance management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The specific design that was adopted is the case study approach. The primary data were gathered through in-depth interviews. In total, 20 heads of departments and employees were purposively sampled. The data gathered from the interviews were analysed using Miles and Huberman’s (1994) approach to qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The paper reveals that the performance management system of the Assembly has not been effective. The study also reveals poor communication, poor integration, low commitment by the top officials, absence of training, inadequate capacity for setting clear targets and objectives, and measuring and evaluation criteria for performance assessment, cultural issues, absence of rewards for good performance, financial constraints, weak and highly bureaucratic management systems as challenges facing performance management system of the assembly.

Practical implications

This study indicates that the training of supervisors and the linking of performance management systems with reward and recognition are key to ensuring an effective implementation of the performance management system of the Assembly.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by examining the performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly in the Western Region of Ghana by describing and drawing lessons from local government experiences in the implementation of performance management systems in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2022

Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng, Patience Obeng Ahwireng, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Michael Kwame Mickson and Albert Ahenkan

The purpose of the study was to examine the electricity challenges confronting slums in order to understand the health implications thereof.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to examine the electricity challenges confronting slums in order to understand the health implications thereof.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized purposive sampling techniques supported by the convenience sampling method within the context of qualitative research to select 30 interviewees of varying demographics for in-depth interviews.

Findings

The findings revealed that slums faced various forms of challenges that are attributable to lack of government support, stringent procedures and financial hardship, among others. The study also found that a lack of health education in the slums has resulted in health problems, such as skin diseases, stomach aches, cholera, typhoid and childbirth complications.

Research limitations/implications

The outcome of this study cannot be generalized to represent the whole population of slums within context due to the qualitative approach.

Practical implications

The study advanced the frontiers of slum literature to understand contextual issues that are important to policymakers and practitioners.

Originality/value

This study revealed a country-specific understanding of the challenges confronting slum dwellers in accessing electricity through the perspective of the two-factor theory of motivation.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng and Alexander Preko

Slum upgrading has received intense attention in the Global South, particularly among stakeholders. This study aims to examine government policy priorities towards slum management…

Abstract

Purpose

Slum upgrading has received intense attention in the Global South, particularly among stakeholders. This study aims to examine government policy priorities towards slum management with the view of establishing its level of commitment in terms of measures undertaken and identify specific policies to structure the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study systematically reviewed national policies, guided by the frequency statistics method in identifying key issues relating to slums management. Content analysis was used to identify findings into themes and discussed in line with the study’s objectives.

Findings

The results revealed the government’s determination to upgrade the existing slums, with the establishment of a Ministry for Inner City and Zongo Development to facilitate collaboration between stakeholders in the value chain of slum management. Furthermore, the study established government’s resolve to strengthen the Local Government Act, 1993, and the National Development Planning Act, 1994 within context to pave way for slums upgrading.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a national policy framework to inform the conclusion reached. Further studies are needed in similar contexts to understand the inputs of government and stakeholders and their contributions towards slum management. This would further expand the frontiers of knowledge in the domain.

Practical implications

The findings revealed policy-driven that can be used by policymakers, practitioners, housing managers and other relevant stakeholders to create workable policies for slum management.

Originality/value

This study provides first insight into government commitment to slums management using national policy documents in context.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Isaac Akomea-Frimpong, Xiaohua Jin, Robert Osei-Kyei and Augustine Senanu Kukah

The contribution of the public–private partnership (PPP) model towards the achievement of the United Nation (UN)'s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been widely…

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Abstract

Purpose

The contribution of the public–private partnership (PPP) model towards the achievement of the United Nation (UN)'s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been widely acknowledged. However, limited studies have shed light on the connection between PPPs and the achievement of these coveted goals in Ghana. In this study, the authors aimed at analysing and synthesising the existing literature on the use of PPP to achieve sustainability in infrastructure projects in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-step approach was used to retrieve and review 60 selected articles aided by content analysis.

Findings

The analysis showed that all existing relevant publications on the application of the PPP model to attain UN’s SDGs in the country are organised around dominant themes, such as poverty alleviation, urban development, waste management and risk management. However, the review revealed little studies exist on pertinent issues relating to PPPs and sustainable development goals, such as climate action, critical resilience, sustainable finance and clean energy.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study is limited to 60 articles in Ghana, the results reveal pertinent gaps for further research studies to achieve sustainable infrastructural development in Ghana and other countries.

Practical implications

Holistically, the outcome of this study will serve as a guide to project managers to understand essential issues on attaining sustainability on public projects.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the literature and practice on the significance of PPP in mainstreaming UN's SDGs in public infrastructure projects.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Robert Osei-Kyei and Albert P.C. Chan

The public sector plays a critical role in the successful implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) projects. Thus, there is a need to holistically explore the public…

Abstract

Purpose

The public sector plays a critical role in the successful implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) projects. Thus, there is a need to holistically explore the public sector’s view on the implementation practices of PPP. This paper aims to explore and compare the public sector’s views on PPP practices in Ghana and Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with PPP practitioners of senior authority in public institutions in both Ghana and Hong Kong. The interviews covered critical issues of PPP implementation practices such as motivations for engaging in PPP, success criteria/indicators, critical success factors (CSFs), external stakeholder management and training and education in PPPs.

Findings

The findings show that quick delivery of public projects and private sector efficiency are the reasons considered by both groups of interviewees. On the success criteria, interviewees from both jurisdictions mentioned user satisfaction, budget, time and quality. The CSFs mentioned by both groups include capacity building and training, project viability, proper planning and good feasibility studies. Sensitization programs, including open forums and community meetings, were mentioned by both groups as measures for managing external stakeholders. On the training and education, both groups mentioned international study tours and organizing courses and seminars.

Originality/value

The outputs of this study offer strategies that are very useful to international private developers who are interested in PPP practices in Africa and Asia. Further, the findings contribute to the knowledge on the international best practices for PPP.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

George Kofi Amoako, Theresa Obuobisa-Darko and Sylvia Ohene Marfo

The paper examines the role of stakeholders in tourism and hospitality industry to ensure sustainability. This study focuses on investigating how stakeholders view can influence…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the role of stakeholders in tourism and hospitality industry to ensure sustainability. This study focuses on investigating how stakeholders view can influence business sustainability in the tourism industry in Ghana and Africa. The study also looks at the future of sustainable tourism activities in Ghana and Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted and interviewees were purposively selected. Using the semi-structured interview 12 people were interviewed and NVivo used to analyse the data. The study was carried out in Accra the capital city of Ghana. Using the stakeholder based theory and resource based theory (RBT) the study addresses how sustainable competitive advantage can be developed.

Findings

Results shows how stakeholders involved such employees, government, community/society, private sector and individual shop owners perceive factors that enhance or limit progress in tourism. Some challenges they encounter include high level of illiteracy, lack of education for upcoming youth, low funding and publicity, lack of the enforcement of laws in the sector. The findings also indicated that to ensure sustainability in the industry the products should be unique, valuable, rare, non-substitutable and non-imitable and has to be advertised.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers encountered difficulties in eliciting answers from stakeholders who are experts and managers in the industry because of their busy schedules. The researcher admits that this research work which is carried out only in Ghana cannot be used to generalise an assumption for the entire industry sectors in Africa and beyond. The sample size could be improved and the study could be conducted in other African countries for the purposes of comparison.

Practical implications

This study reveals how stakeholders view developments in the tourism sector and this can be used as a guide in developing policies and marketing strategies in the tourism industry. Both theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Originality/value

Very little literature has been written on stakeholders' view on business sustainability in the tourism industry in Ghana. Moreover the use of stakeholder and resource based view theories application in developing competitive advantage in the developing country perspective is unique. The findings in no small way will somehow benefit the government and industry stakeholders by providing the latest views and perspectives in Ghana.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

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