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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

John Richard Thomas Bustard, Peter Bolan, Adrian Devine and Karise Hutchinson

The use of “special events” as an attractor for destinations in the smart tourism paradigm has been suggested as one element of an effective destination strategy. This study aims…

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Abstract

Purpose

The use of “special events” as an attractor for destinations in the smart tourism paradigm has been suggested as one element of an effective destination strategy. This study aims to create new understandings of this potentiality by exploring an event from a participant perspective in smart tourism contexts by creating a model integrating factors impacting the smart event experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted five online focus groups by using Facebook secret groups to engage spectators of an international sports event. Discussions focussed on the digital event experience with particular reference to the event app. A subsequent interpretative phenomenological analysis facilitated the examination of how people make sense of this digital phenomenon and the impact on the overall event experience.

Findings

The findings demonstrate an increasing demand for real-time event integrative information, with more immersive and augmented experiences often sought by users. This has significant implications for the management of the digital event experience for all event stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in its analysis of the smart event experience because of the use of a purposive sample from the International NW200 Event in Northern Ireland, which may limit the generalisability of research findings.

Originality/value

The study therefore, meets a critical gap in existent literature by providing the first event experience model in a smart tourism context and presenting the interlocking elements through the 4P’s (people, processes, personalisation and places) and 7R’s (rituals, realms, realities, renewal, review, relational and resourcing) of digital event experience.

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Frances Devine, Tom Baum, Niamh Hearns and Adrian Devine

This paper aims to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by hospitality employers in accommodating a culturally diverse workforce in Northern Ireland.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by hospitality employers in accommodating a culturally diverse workforce in Northern Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory paper based on interviews with hospitality employers in Northern Ireland. It seeks to answer the question “What opportunities and challenges does a culturally diverse workforce create for hoteliers in Northern Ireland?”.

Findings

This research highlights the potential of international workers as an invaluable new source of labour for the hospitality industry, provided that they are properly looked after and managed.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could analyse the role of multicultural management in assuring business benefits associated with cultural diversity.

Practical implications

The research suggests the importance of a positive proactive management system and solutions for training that could be incorporated into the workplace that celebrates its employee's cultures, that values and explores differences and that actively seeks to learn from other cultures, demonstrates tolerance, respects differences, identifies similarities and strives for inclusiveness. Training solutions are provided.

Originality/value

This study suggests the removal of barriers to the successful integration of international staff into the workplace and society, while benefiting all staff, their organisations and the Irish tourism product.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Adrian Devine and Frances Devine

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the structure of government-funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the structure of government-funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 62 in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.

Findings

The standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events, highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level.

Originality/value

This paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government-funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Adrian Devine and Frances Devine

The economic recession, which began in late 2007 has, and will continue to have, repercussions for the events industry. Unemployment and inflation coupled with shrinking public…

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Abstract

Purpose

The economic recession, which began in late 2007 has, and will continue to have, repercussions for the events industry. Unemployment and inflation coupled with shrinking public and private sector budgets have made the operating environment difficult. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the recession and the austerity measures that followed have affected UK events – and will continue to do so.

Design/methodology/approach

Some previous research has argued that a downturn in the economy can stimulate creativity and innovation. This paper lends some support to this argument as it examines how the recession has forced the organising committee of one of Europe's most prestigious international youth football (soccer) tournaments to “think beyond the football” and start to look at innovative ways to off‐set the cuts in its funding. The paper focuses on the Northern Ireland Milk Cup Youth Football Tournament, which is regarded as one of the most prestigious youth football tournaments in Europe.

Findings

Based on data gathered from various stakeholders via interviews and focus groups the paper discusses how the tournament can generate extra revenue from gate receipts, corporate hospitality, merchandising, programming, sponsorship and marketing.

Practical implications

Event organisers can learn two important lessons from this study: first, the current economic climate is challenging but they should try and think “outside the box” as challenges can present opportunities; and second, consult and collaborate with event stakeholders, as their insight and ideas may prove invaluable in these challenging times.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the impact of the recession on the events industry.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Adrian Devine, Emily Boyle and Stephen Boyd

Collaboration is now an important part of public sector management. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that have helped shape the relationships between public…

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Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration is now an important part of public sector management. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that have helped shape the relationships between public agencies involved in sports tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Using critical case sampling 54 in‐depth interviews were conducted with public officials in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Findings

The authors have produced the “Theory of collaborative advantage in relation to sports tourism”. This model captures the dynamics of collaboration in the sports tourism policy arena. A total of 12 practitioner themes and four cross‐cutting themes were identified and although each theme and the issues and tensions identified within it can affect inter‐organizational relationships in a particular way, the model illustrates how each theme is interlinked and is part of a larger, more complex picture.

Research limitations /implications

Like all empirical research, this paper has its limitations but if the issues that affect collaboration are not identified then they cannot be addressed. Although no two collaborative settings are the same, public sector managers need to be aware of the factors that affect, or may affect, inter‐organizational relationships so that they can pre‐empt problems and maximise the use of resources.

Practical implications

Hopefully this paper will, in some way, lead to better planning and management of sports tourism and encourage those involved in sports tourism policy to adapt a collaborative, rather than an isolated, approach.

Originality/value

This study has contributed to knowledge by providing a better understanding of the inter‐relationships in the sports tourism policy arena.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Richard Teare

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2013

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Chulmo Koo, Luiz Mendes-Filho and Dimitrios Buhalis

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Abstract

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2023

Iain Munro and Kate Kenny

Whistleblowing plays a crucial role in revealing organizational misconduct and systemic corruption in industry and government. This paper investigates changing practices of…

Abstract

Whistleblowing plays a crucial role in revealing organizational misconduct and systemic corruption in industry and government. This paper investigates changing practices of whistleblower activism, with particular reference to the role of solidarity and the increased role of support networks. Many modern whistleblower disclosures have revealed gaping flaws in the system of global governance related to a range of important social and economic issues, such as tax evasion, global mass surveillance, the use of torture and illegal wars of aggression. All these forms of systemic corruption are reliant on the use of secrecy havens to conceal the abuse from public scrutiny and democratic oversight. Counter-hegemonic social movements that oppose forms of systemic corruption can find important allies in those whistleblowers, who leak vital information about misconduct and corruption to the public. In this paper, we argue that there is a clear relationship of mutual support between whistleblowing and activist social movements, both in the process of whistleblowing and in furthering the campaigns of the social movements themselves. We theorize this, unpacking the processes and dynamics underlying the relationship, and offering a framework for analysis. The paper concludes with a discussion of the changing role of whistleblower activism and support networks in undertaking social reform and counter-hegemonic practice.

Details

Organizational Wrongdoing as the “Foundational” Grand Challenge: Consequences and Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-282-7

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 December 2023

Christine T. Domegan, Tina Flaherty, John McNamara, David Murphy, Jonathan Derham, Mark McCorry, Suzanne Nally, Maurice Eakin, Dmitry Brychkov, Rebecca Doyle, Arthur Devine, Eva Greene, Joseph McKenna, Finola OMahony and Tadgh O'Mahony

To combat climate change, protect biodiversity, maintain water quality, facilitate a just transition for workers and engage citizens and communities, a diversity of stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

To combat climate change, protect biodiversity, maintain water quality, facilitate a just transition for workers and engage citizens and communities, a diversity of stakeholders across multiple levels work together and collaborate to co-create mutually beneficial solutions. This paper aims to illustrate how a 7.5-year collaboration between local communities, researchers, academics, companies, state agencies and policymakers is contributing to the reframing of industrial harvested peatlands to regenerative ecosystems and carbon sinks with impacts on ecological, economic, social and cultural systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The European Union LIFE Integrated Project, Peatlands and People, responding to Ireland’s Climate Action Plan, represents Europe’s largest rehabilitation of industrially harvested peatlands. It makes extensive use of marketing research for reframing strategies and actions by partners, collaborators and communities in the evolving context of a just transition to a carbon-neutral future.

Findings

The results highlight the ecological, economic, social and cultural reframing of peatlands from fossil fuel and waste lands to regenerative ecosystems bursting with biodiversity and climate solution opportunities. Reframing impacts requires muddling through the ebbs and flows of planned, possible and unanticipated change that can deliver benefits for peatlands and people over time.

Research limitations/implications

At 3 of 7.5 years into a project, the authors are muddling through how ecological reframing impacts economic and social/cultural reframing. Further impacts, planned and unplanned, can be expected.

Practical implications

This paper shows how an impact planning canvas tool and impact taxonomy can be applied for social and systems change. The tools can be used throughout a project to understand, respond to and manage for unplanned events. There is constant learning, constantly going back to the impact planning canvas and checking where we are, what is needed. There is action and reaction to each other and to the diversity of stakeholders affected and being affected by the reframing work.

Originality/value

This paper considers how systemic change through ecological, economic, social and cultural reframing is a perfectly imperfect process of muddling through which holds the promise of environmental, economic, technological, political, social and educational impacts to benefit nature, individuals, communities, organisations and society.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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