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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Graham Whitehead and Adam Barnard

The increased use of mental health interventions employing cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) over the last decade raises the significant theme of the efficacy of such treatments…

Abstract

Purpose

The increased use of mental health interventions employing cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) over the last decade raises the significant theme of the efficacy of such treatments for people with disabilities. Recent evidence‐based studies regarding the application of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with disabilities have highlighted issues concerning access to services, questions of engagement and efficacy of the cognitive aspects of CBT practice and service models and forms of delivery. The purpose of this paper is to explore these themes with particular emphasis on barriers to accessibility for this population and provide consideration of ethical and effective practice aspects of psychological interventions in response to the recent World Health Organisation recommendations on disability provision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the development of the “enabling environments” theme for people with disabilities within a mental health context within Europe, with a view to exploring barriers to social inclusion and service user autonomy. The paper is designed to review and enhance existing literature in the field and to question the philosophical position of cognitive‐behavioural approaches to mental health provision in a European context.

Findings

Consideration is given to the use and application of CBT and evidence‐based practice (EBP) and considers efficacy in mental health provision for this population. Consideration is also given to the efficacy and appropriateness of short‐term interventions for this population.

Research limitations/implications

As a conceptual paper, the limitations of the discussion are that the views expressed are solely those of the authors but the paper usefully develops consideration of the existing literature in the field and discusses the implications of developing inclusive practice in mental health provision for this population.

Practical implications

The issues discussed in the paper offer significant questions relevant to the delivery of mental health provision for people with disabilities from a European perspective. Practical implications relate to the development of inclusive practice for practitioners in the delivery of these services.

Social implications

The social implications of the paper are significant, as the issues discussed raise questions about how mental health services approach their provision for people with disabilities. From a social context, the conceptual discussion offers insights useful to develop effective mental health provision and promote service user responsibility and autonomy.

Originality/value

As a conceptual paper, the originality of the submission relates to questioning the efficacy of more recent developments in the mental health field re: philosophy of approach and method and recommendations are offered by the authors which may impact service delivery, the focus of relevant evidence‐based practice and service user autonomy.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Kirsteen Beart, Adam Barnard and Hannah Skelhorn

This lack of knowledge and experience meant that students often found it difficult to engage with this very complex, conceptual and controversial area of health and social care…

Abstract

Purpose

This lack of knowledge and experience meant that students often found it difficult to engage with this very complex, conceptual and controversial area of health and social care. The use of visual methodologies in learning mental health and illness was being examined here with a view to its potential for overcoming this obstacle in the students’ learning and further assisting students in their conceptual understanding of the subject. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 participants were recruited from a student population of 44 undergraduates studying a module at level three on mental health. Ethics and consent were secured by giving students full information to decide whether to be part of the study group. The methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis was the philosophical framework used for the study and this was directed using a five-staged process. Data were collected through group discussions and collation of the students analysis of their visualisations.

Findings

Students in the study were encouraged to think about mental health and illness in a non-traditional way of learning. Visualisation of their own perceptions or pre-conceived ideas of MH were explored. This led to some very insightful learning which included not only learning about the subject from a holistic perspective but also a continual reframing of students’ conception of mental health and an enhancement of their understanding. They demonstrated this by developing skills in “self-reflection and professional values development” which are key skills of a mental health practitioner.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have implications for further research into how this type of learning can actually influence practitioners when they do work with people with mental health challenges and illness. This study was limited to a fundamentally theoretical plan for how the learning contributes to professional practice. It is also important to note that the students were also benefitting from the evidence, experience and value of the teaching and learning in a traditional sense so it is not completely clear of that influence of the innovative methodology. Therefore another aspect of study which could enhance the understanding of the influence of visualisation in mental health is to compare practitioners practice who use this technique to learn and develop and those who use a more traditional educational approach.

Practical implications

This research will inform the use of a pedagogy approach in education, learning and teaching about concepts of mental health and illness and contribute to professional practice in health and social care education.

Social implications

This paper makes contributions to mental health practice, visualisation, mental health education.

Originality/value

Overall, the study offers an opening into the value of visual methodology in mental health awareness, education and practice and a contribution to professional practice in mental health education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Susan B. Malcolm and Nell Tabor Hartley

The purpose of the paper is to position Chester I. Barnard as a “management pioneer,” someone who offers an example of management theory through moral persuasion, authenticity…

6206

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to position Chester I. Barnard as a “management pioneer,” someone who offers an example of management theory through moral persuasion, authenticity, and trust in his “acceptance view of authority” and “zone of indifference.” The work of Barnard is supported by philosophical foundations that provide prophetic lessons for present day leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used to research the topic was inductive reasoning and constructive hermeneutics. Primary resources relied upon Barnard's foundational work in The Functions of the Executive as well as books and journal publications by scholars such as Isocrates, Aristotle, Smith, Kant, Weber, Follett, Gadamer, Bennis, Drucker, Cartwright, Heames, Harvey, Lamond, Wolfe, and Wren.

Findings

The research demonstrates the significance of Chester I. Barnard as a “management pioneer.” Barnard provides wisdom for effectively navigating the twenty‐first century organization under the auspices of the “acceptance view of authority” and “zone of indifference.” These concepts are predicated on Barnard's moral persuasion, authenticity, and trust as foundations for leadership. His work is a testament for bridging the gap between theory and practice and provides a model from which business schools can educate present and future leaders.

Practical implications

The paper examines the underpinnings of Barnard's “acceptance view of authority” and his “zone of indifference” as predicated on morality, authenticity, and trust in creating effective organizational leadership for the twenty‐first century. The work has practical applications in the education of present and future business leaders by academic institutions.

Originality/value

In support of Chester I. Barnard as a “management pioneer,” this paper explores some of the less commonly discussed implicit qualities and philosophical foundations for Barnard's moral persuasion, authenticity, and trust that promote the success of his “acceptance view of authority” and “zone of indifference” in the twenty‐first century. The timeless quality, application, and potential for leadership education, ensure Barnard's position as a “management pioneer.”

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

David Lamond

1406

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Donald Palmer and Tim Weiss

Entrepreneurs and their ventures are often portrayed as unambiguously positive forces in society. Specifically, high technology and equity-funded startups are heralded for their…

Abstract

Entrepreneurs and their ventures are often portrayed as unambiguously positive forces in society. Specifically, high technology and equity-funded startups are heralded for their innovative products and services that are believed to alter the economic, social, and even political fabric of life in advantageous ways. This paper draws on established theory on the causes of misconduct in and by organizations to elaborate the factors that can give rise to misconduct in entrepreneurial ventures, illustrating our arguments with case material on both widely known and less well-known instances of entrepreneurial misconduct. In venturing into the dark side of entrepreneurship, we hope to contribute to theory on entrepreneurship and organizational misconduct, augment entrepreneurship pedagogy, and offer ideas and examples that can enhance entrepreneurs’ awareness of their susceptibility to wrongdoing.

Details

Entrepreneurialism and Society: New Theoretical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-658-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Mary Sue Love, Granger Macy and Thomas W. Dougherty

Barnard was acutely aware of the social factors present in organizations and their influence on the effectiveness of organizations. He realized that cooperation, and more…

Abstract

Barnard was acutely aware of the social factors present in organizations and their influence on the effectiveness of organizations. He realized that cooperation, and more specifically that systems of cooperation, were a critical, essential element of effective organizational functioning. This paper extends Barnard’s conception of cooperative systems into what we call the coworker effect. The coworker effect is as an important factor linking positive individual behavior with the broader social context of the work group. In this article we will discuss the outcomes of the coworker effect and the sources that give it its power. In so doing, we can show how cooperative systems behaviorally impact on organizations and how organizations might be able to marshal this important resource more effectively.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

Gianmarco Lorenti, Ivan Mariuzzo, Francesco Moraglio and Maurizio Repetto

This paper aims to compare stochastic gradient method used for neural network training with global optimizer without use of gradient information, in particular differential…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare stochastic gradient method used for neural network training with global optimizer without use of gradient information, in particular differential evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

This contribute shows the application of heuristic optimization algorithms to the training phase of artificial neural network whose aim is to predict renewable power production as function of environmental variables such as solar irradiance and temperature. The training problem is cast as the minimization of a cost function whose degrees of freedom are the parameters of the neural network. A differential evolution algorithm is substituted to the more usual gradient-based minimization procedure, and the comparison of their performances is presented.

Findings

The two procedures based on stochastic gradient and differential evolution reach the same results being the gradient based moderately quicker in convergence but with a lower value of reliability, as a significant number of runs do not reach convergence.

Research limitations/implications

The approach has been applied to two forecasting problems and, even if results are encouraging, the need for extend the approach to other problems is needed.

Practical implications

The new approach could open the training of neural network to more stable and general methods, exploiting the potentialities of parallel computing.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the research presented is fully original for the part regarding the neural network training with differential evolution.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering , vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Deryk Stec

This paper aims to examine how residues of ancient images have influenced one’s perspectives on management. Increased attention has been given to the absence of bodies within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how residues of ancient images have influenced one’s perspectives on management. Increased attention has been given to the absence of bodies within discussions of organisations; however, far less attention has been given to the interplay between organisations and images of one’s body.

Design/methodology/approach

By comparing the perceived benefits of studying sport (e.g. passion, embodiment and action) with the tensions that existed between athletic performances and an ancient image of the body, this paper draws attention to residuals that exist within discussions of organisations.

Findings

In a context where an image of the body encouraged moderation, the appropriate levels of heat, and the development of an immaterial and eternal soul, athletic performances, which were physical, extreme, focused on the body and generated excessive heat, were often problematic. These problems are then examined within the literature discussing current issues in management.

Research limitations/implications

Sport has the potential to facilitate one’s understanding of issues that management, consistent with ancient images of the body, has traditionally neglected (i.e. extremes, passion) and the possibilities of using embodied cognition to enhance our understandings of performance, teams and leading are discussed.

Social implications

As scientists become increasingly concerned about the long-term consequences of the reduced opportunities for cultural programs (sport, art, music, etc.), revisiting one’s assumptions is increasingly important, especially as athletics and philosophy once shared the same physical space.

Originality/value

By describing how residues from historical images of the body have influenced the thinking about organizing, this paper highlights the connection between the social and the biological and demonstrates how vestiges from the past influence contemporary discussions.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Kenneth S. Rhee and Tracey Honeycutt Sigler

Motivation theory in the 20th century has evolved to meet the changing social, political, and economic environment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the developmental path…

Abstract

Motivation theory in the 20th century has evolved to meet the changing social, political, and economic environment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the developmental path of modern motivation theory from the perspective of the Tao and the cyclical nature of Yin and Yang. We review motivation theory from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The developmental path during the past 100 years consists of seven distinct stages, each stage representing a significant shift in theory as well as a shift in the social, political, and economic environment in the United States. The dominant theme that emerges from the analysis is the discourse between science and humanity, and the revolving cycle of these fundamental theories throughout the century.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Adam Huxley and Sarah Foulger

This paper considers parents who misuse substances. The potential impacts of their substance misuse on their ability to parent effectively and safely (parenting capacity) are…

Abstract

This paper considers parents who misuse substances. The potential impacts of their substance misuse on their ability to parent effectively and safely (parenting capacity) are explored, as are some of the barriers many parents face when attempting to seek treatment for problematic substance misuse. The terms ‘use’ and ‘misuse’ are used interchangeably in this paper and ‘substances’ refers to alcohol, illicit drugs and overuse of prescribed medicines. It is important to make the distinction between parents whose use of substances does not constitute dependency and might be best described as ‘recreational or hazardous’. Such individuals might not seek treatment and estimates of prevalence rates of use among this cohort are difficult as they remain hidden from services. Parents who might already be in treatment services or who might be seeking treatment might be described as ‘problematic or dependent’ although presentation at services is neither necessary nor sufficient to assume that the individual's misuse of substances is problematic or indicative of a dependency. The use of substances is associated with numerous harms to the individual: psychologically, socially, interpersonally and physically, and is a risk factor towards negative parenting practices. The use of substances in itself is not an indication of neglectful or harmful parenting, as many parents who use substances have adequate parenting skills, however, it is more frequently associated as a risk rather than a protective factor when considering potential harms. Most of the research refers to mothers although we are aware that some fathers may have sole parenting responsibility for their children. Parents, in particular mothers, face many barriers when trying to access substance misuse treatment services. When they are in treatment, services often lack the skills and experiences to be able to balance managing child protection issues and engaging the parent in treatment. A full review of the issues associated with parenting and substance misuse is beyond the scope of this paper and the reader is referred to Fowler (2003), Cleaver et al (1999), Velleman and Templeton (2007) and Day and George (2005) and the British Psychological Society's Child Protection Portfolio (2007) for further discussion.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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