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1 – 10 of 12
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Andrew H. Kelly, Jasper Brown and Aaron Strickland

This paper aims to not only disentangle the recently altered law and policy on coastal management in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, but also raise opportunities for fresh ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to not only disentangle the recently altered law and policy on coastal management in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, but also raise opportunities for fresh ideas to develop when dealing with both existing and future coastal damage. The focus is on the role of local government which is not only closer to concerned citizens but also faces costal damage on its own doorstep.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the topic from the beginnings of relevant statutory law to the current situation, supported by a case study. It is transdisciplinary in nature, encompassing land use and coastal legislation.

Findings

The narrative encourages further attention to the key issues at the local level. This is underpinned by the need for planners to move beyond zoning and other restrictive mechanisms to more strategic approaches. All levels of government must recognise that regulatory planning on its own is insufficient. This leads to the need for champions to consider opportunities beyond the ordinary.

Originality/value

While this paper will add to a growing literature on coastal damage and action at the local level, its emphasis on the benefits and limitations of the changing statutory system will assist not only policy makers but professional officers at the local forefront.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Melanie Merola

– The purpose of this paper was to understand the experience of those living with the Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to understand the experience of those living with the Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse seven interviews with Young Offenders aged 18-21 who were serving an IPP sentence. Two participants were past their tariff expiry date, two had less than a year until their tariff date and three had more than a year until their tariff date.

Findings

Several themes were found, each with their own subthemes: Injustice of the Justice System, Not Knowing, Coping, Change and Walking on Eggshells. Participants still detailed negative aspects of the sentence but within this was one, important, positive aspect, namely the inspiration the sentence gave for them to change their offending behaviour. However, this has come at a cost with participants feeling as though they have been treated unfairly, finding it difficult to cope, feeling victimised and finding it difficult to see a future.

Practical implications

Lapses in motivation do not necessarily reflect the risk of the person but the difficulty of the sentence. Motivation can be fostered and developed through motivational interviewing, praise and peer support IPPs should be given more credit for the way they manage themselves daily and more understanding when they struggle. IPPs could be victimised by determinate prisoners or by staff. Establishments should be aware of this and help IPPs resolve situations without feeling like they are a victim. Consideration should be given to converting IPP sentences to determinate sentences.

Originality/value

Previous research focused on the negative aspects of the sentence, the purpose was therefore to approach the situation with an open mind and by using a method that allows those with an IPP sentence to share their experience of the sentence. IPA allowed for exploration of the effects of the sentence on those serving it and therefore gains a further understanding of the impact of the sentence.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2015

Joseph Calvin Gagnon and Brian R. Barber

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve youth…

Abstract

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve youth with complicated and often serious academic and behavioral needs. The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and practices with Best Available Evidence are necessary to increase the likelihood of long-term success for these youth. In this chapter, we define three primary categories of AES and review what we know about the characteristics of youth in these schools. Next, we discuss the current emphasis on identifying and implementing EBPs with regard to both academic interventions (i.e., reading and mathematics) and interventions addressing student behavior. In particular, we consider implementation in AES, where there are often high percentages of youth requiring special education services and who have a significant need for EBPs to succeed academically, behaviorally, and in their transition to adulthood. We focus our discussion on: (a) examining approaches to identifying EBPs; (b) providing a brief review of EBPs and Best Available Evidence in the areas of mathematics, reading, and interventions addressing student behavior for youth in AES; (c) delineating key implementation challenges in AES; and (d) providing recommendations for how to facilitate the use of EBPs in AES.

Details

Transition of Youth and Young Adults
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-933-2

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Robert Raeside and John Walker

In modern business the acquisition and management of information has become a competitive force. It can be argued that this has always been the case. Critical in the gathering of…

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Abstract

In modern business the acquisition and management of information has become a competitive force. It can be argued that this has always been the case. Critical in the gathering of information and its analysis is the use of statistics, yet there remains a huge element of distrust amongst senior management in the use of statistical tools. Some of the reasons for this will be discussed in this paper and the issue of the need for statisticians to take more responsibility for bridging this gap will be raised. A theme of this paper is how recent trends in knowledge discovery and data mining (KDD) may be instrumental in breaking down traditional barriers between analysts and managers. Case studies from the use of KDD in customer relations management are presented, from which guidelines for the acquisition and management of information will be given. Some cautionary pointers, such as the need to look beyond current customer bases and to speculate in possible organisational and market futures, will also be given. Case studies will be drawn from the areas of contract electronic manufacture, education and financial retailing.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Robert Raeside and John Walker

172

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive simulation…

1216

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive simulation. Gender, academic major and business core course performance were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period. Variables included learning assurance measures, simulation performance, gender, major, business core course grades, capstone course grade and cumulative grade point average. Correlations, linear regression, multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Learning assurance report scores were strongly related to simulation performance. Simulation performance was related to capstone course grade, which, in turn, was significantly related to the grade point average (GPA). Core business courses were related to learning assurance and performance indicators. Significant differences for gender and degree major were found for academic performance measures. Women and men did not differ in simulation performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of one simulation (GLO-BUS) and studying students at one university taught by one professor. Assurance of learning measures needs further study as factors in business program evaluation. Future research should analyze post-graduate performance and career achievements in relation to assurance of learning outcomes.

Originality/value

This study conducts empirical analyses of simulation learning that focuses entirely on direct measures, including student characteristics (gender, major), learning assurance measures, business core course grades, capstone course grades and student GPAs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2023

Jesse McCain and Josipa Roksa

The purpose of this study is to examine how doctoral students in the biological sciences understand their research skill development and explore potential racial/ethnic and gender…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how doctoral students in the biological sciences understand their research skill development and explore potential racial/ethnic and gender inequalities in the scientific learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on interviews with 87 doctoral students in the biological sciences, this study explores how doctoral students describe development of their research skills. More specifically, a constructivist grounded theory approach is employed to understand how doctoral students make meaning of their research skill development process and how that may vary by gender and race/ethnicity.

Findings

The findings reveal two emergent groups, “technicians” who focus on discrete tasks and data collection, and “interpreters” who combine technical expertise with attention to the larger scientific field. Although both groups are developing important skills, “interpreters” have a broader range of skills that support successful scholarly careers in science. Notably, white men are overrepresented among the “interpreters,” whereas white women and students from minoritized racial/ethnic groups are concentrated among the “technicians.”

Originality/value

While prior literature provides valuable insights into the inequalities across various aspects of doctoral socialization, scholars have rarely attended to examining inequalities in research skill development. This study provides new insights into the process of scientific learning in graduate school. Findings reveal that research skill development is not a uniform experience, and that doctoral education fosters different kinds of learning that vary by gender and race/ethnicity.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Sara Willox, Jennifer Morin and Sandra Avila

Team-based projects are being used at work in various industries and in education. This paper aims to share a training strategy that integrates training with casual games to…

1869

Abstract

Purpose

Team-based projects are being used at work in various industries and in education. This paper aims to share a training strategy that integrates training with casual games to effectively prepare individuals to perform better in team-based settings due to their acquisition of team skills combined with their knowledge of tools including a team charter, communication plan and conflict resolution plan.

Design/methodology/approach

A training module was developed, deployed and tested in a virtual classroom of an upper-level undergraduate business class to emulate real-world team experiences. In the study, 342 of the 631 participants enrolled chose to complete the optional training module, which included pre- and posttests followed by a perception survey. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the impact of the training upon team skills including communication, conflict resolution and feelings of belonging.

Findings

The pre- and posttest results for trainees indicated a significant increase in team process and development knowledge, which included concepts such as communication, conflict resolution methods, roles, goal-setting and expectation-setting. Survey results indicated a correlation between completing the team training module and improved communication within teams, particularly for teams developing a communication plan in addition to a team charter and conflict resolution strategies.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature on preparing individuals for success in teams through training and education using interactive games, while equipping them with tools to contribute to favorable team dynamics and outcomes. The results are applicable to business, organizations and training settings that incorporate team-based projects in online, hybrid and face-to-face settings.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance learning (DL) compared to traditional classroom (on-ground [OG]) delivery modes using experiential learning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period in a medium-sized private master’s level college is investigated. Variables included learning assurance measures from a competitive online simulation (GLO-BUS), gender, business degree major, capstone course grades and cumulative grade point averages. The analytic strategy included correlations, linear regressions, multiple regressions and multivariate analyses of variance.

Findings

Results reveal that there are significant differences in learning assurance report (LAR) scores, gender differences and differences between academic majors based on delivery mode (OG versus DL). Simulation performance was higher for DL students, although the relationship between simulation performance and final course grades was not significantly different for OG and DL cohorts.

Research limitations/implications

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, implications for courses, programs, curricula and learning assessment are considered. The strengths (actual performance measures) and potential limitations (e.g. possible deficiency of measures) of LAR scores are discussed.

Originality/value

This research compares OG and DL modes for strategic management course outcomes using direct assessments, including simulation learning assurance measures, student characteristics, capstone course grades and student grade point averages.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Mathieu Dumont, Catherine Briand, Ginette Aubin, Alexandre Dumais and Stéphane Potvin

This study aims to develop immersive scenarios (immersive videos) to foster generalization of learning while addressing social cognition, a factor associated to violence in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop immersive scenarios (immersive videos) to foster generalization of learning while addressing social cognition, a factor associated to violence in schizophrenia. The authors sought to develop immersive videos that generate a sense of presence; are socially realistic; and can be misinterpreted and, if so, lead to anger.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiphase mixed method was used to develop and validate the immersive scenarios. The development phase consisted of preliminary interviews and co-design workshops with patients (n = 7) and mental health practitioners (n = 7). The validation phase was conducted with patients (n = 7) and individuals without mental disorders (n = 7).

Findings

The development phase led to the creation of five scenarios (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5); they included social cues which could lead to self-referential and intentional biases. Results of the validation phase showed that all scenarios generated a sense of presence and were considered highly realistic. Three scenarios elicited biases and, consequently, moderate levels of anger (annoyance).

Practical implications

Immersive videos represent a relevant and accessible technological solution to address social-cognitive domains such as self-reference bias.

Originality/value

No intervention using immersive technologies had been developed or studied yet for individuals with schizophrenia at risk of violence in secure settings. This project demonstrated the feasibility of creating immersive videos which have relevant attributes to foster generalization of learning in the remediation of social-cognitive deficits.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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