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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sarah P. Lonbay and Toby Brandon

The increased involvement of adults at risk in the safeguarding process has become a prominent issue within English safeguarding policy. However, there is evidence to suggest that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The increased involvement of adults at risk in the safeguarding process has become a prominent issue within English safeguarding policy. However, there is evidence to suggest that actual levels of involvement are still low. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a PhD study in relation to the benefits of advocacy in supporting this involvement in adult safeguarding for older people.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in the study included advocates and social workers who had experience of working with older people through the safeguarding process within two North East England local authorities. A critical realist approach through in-depth interviews was taken with all the participants.

Findings

The research findings in relation to the benefits of advocacy in supporting older people going through safeguarding processes are reported. The practical limitations and factors which help and hinder advocacy support within the process are also considered. The theoretical implications for power, empowerment, and advocacy are also explored.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation of this research is that it did not include older people who had been through safeguarding amongst the participants.

Practical implications

Key implications for practice and policy are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview and critique of empowerment in adult safeguarding and the role that advocates play in promoting this key principle.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Norman Anthony McClelland, Toby Brandon, Wendy Dyer, Kathryn Cassidy, Louise Ridley and Paul Biddle

There is clear evidence that prison can be detrimental to mental health and that wider society has tended to assume “out of sight, out of mind” for prisoners in mental distress…

Abstract

Purpose

There is clear evidence that prison can be detrimental to mental health and that wider society has tended to assume “out of sight, out of mind” for prisoners in mental distress. The lack of access to effective mental health care in prisons along with increasingly lower numbers of prison officers, or Operational Officers (OOs), has created a negative culture that requires the development of specialist services. With this comes a need to conduct evaluations, and investigations, into the roles of OOs and mental health-care staff. This study aims to report on a commissioned evaluation around the introduction and development of an HMP Mental Health Unit, named the integrated support unit (ISU), in the North of England. This study’s section of the wider evaluation focuses on the early team building, working practice and development of mental health registered nurses, other care staff and OOs within the ISU.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups incorporating two professional groups took place on the ISU. The first of six Mental Health Workers (MHW) including Registered Mental Health Nurses and support workers; the second of two sets of two ISU dedicated OOs. The areas addressed within each of the groups concerned why staff wanted to work in the ISU, as well as how they would measure its potential success, and the necessary skills competencies and training they thought were required to prepare them to work in the area.

Findings

Overall, the participants expressed an interest or enthusiasm for their work having actively chosen to work in the ISU. There was a strong sense of a wish for the unit to succeed; in fact, success was a motivating drive for all. Both OOs and MHW emphasised the importance of teamworking, autonomy and freedom as well as information sharing. Analysis also revealed many areas of practice that were challenging. The findings are optimistic for the development of such special units as evaluated here. The drivers for different professions along with their measures of success in the field are discussed in detail. The relationship, expectations, hopes and needs of both MHW and prison officers working in a multidisciplinary unit provide useful information to support both policy and practice in the field. The authors make recommendations around training regimes and how they can effectively coordinate the different symbiotic professional roles. The ISU is a new initiative in offender management within prisons and is reviewed as a model of mental health practice in prison settings.

Practical implications

The value in recruiting to the ISU dedicated OOs, with committed interests in mental health. A continued emphasis on the ongoing development of team working, focussing on issues of risk, trust and treatment. The development (by nurses) of a formal/mandatory period of training for new OO’s prior to taking up a role on the ISU. For mental health nurses to embrace team leadership/educator roles in the areas of mental health awareness, team building and conflict resolution. To capture and formulate and develop the specific range of mental health interventions offered within the ISU.

Originality/value

The presented research explores and evaluates the introduction of a new mental health wing (ISU) for 11 patients in a Northern UK prison. It does this through the consideration of group discussions with both MHW and OOs on this wing. This work is part of a larger study.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Victoria Armstrong and Toby Brandon

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from a detailed qualitative PhD study exploring experiences of stigma and discrimination in the lives of people in receipt of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from a detailed qualitative PhD study exploring experiences of stigma and discrimination in the lives of people in receipt of “mental health support” at two voluntary sector organisations in the North East of England.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical material was collected during two periods of three-month long ethnographic periods of fieldwork from July to December of 2013 at two organisations providing support to their members who experience or have experienced mental distress. Along with field notes taken during and after periods of participant observation, the empirical material also included 30 interviews with staff (n=10) and members (n=20) across both organisations, along with a series of three focus groups at each organisation.

Findings

Staff at the organisations did not demonstrate obvious stigmatising or discriminatory attitudes or behaviours. However, they did attribute “self-stigma” to particular attitudes and behaviours of some of the members they support, referring to how they “made excuses”, “did not try” and/or “avoided situations”.

Originality/value

This paper argues that these attributions resulted from the misrecognition of members’ reactions to experiences of discrimination. The empirical material also suggests that these attributions of self-stigma may be indicative of the material limitations of the support environment, the consequent frustrations of well-intentioned staff, and, overall, as symptoms of neoliberalism. Drawing upon a Mad Studies approach and focussing on self-stigma and its attribution in contemporary mental health support, this paper provides a new perspective, which considers how stigma is linked to discrimination by rethinking what is thought of as “self-stigma”.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Chris Gibbs, Toby Brandon, Christina Cooper and Mick Hill

Mental health is a sensitive topic to teach, as it’s difficult to judge anyone’s personal experiences of mental distress. Northumbria University has developed a programme…

Abstract

Mental health is a sensitive topic to teach, as it’s difficult to judge anyone’s personal experiences of mental distress. Northumbria University has developed a programme explicitly for people with experience of mental distress who have an interest in being involved in research. This chapter discusses how it is important to be sensitive to the different experiences that students have and to develop reciprocal trust. It goes on to discuss the importance of creating a safe space for students to learn about mental health and research and provide some tips for doing so. These tips include being clear about individual biases and limitations, using personal stories and examples to connect with students, emphasising the importance of resilience, connecting students to resources and being open and flexible to offering additional support in a sensitive way. The chapter also discusses the challenges that students experiencing mental distress may face in academia, such as low self-esteem, imposter syndrome, and difficulties in accessing resources. The chapter provides some suggestions as to how educators can address these challenges such as providing students with opportunities to share personal experiences and learning to turn those experiences into assets. In addition, this chapter highlights the potential for students to shift their identity from ‘patient’ to ‘student’ to ‘researcher’ as they engage in the learning process. This shift in identity can be empowering and can help students to feel more in control of both their mental health and their futures. Overall, the chapter provides valuable insights into how to teach about mental health in an inclusive and sensitive way. The tips and suggestions provided can help educators to create safe and trusting environments for students to learn and address challenges with mental health often faced in academia.

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Abstract

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Abstract

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

David Nichol, William McGovern and Ruth McGovern

Any topic can be sensitive, and every subject area will have sensitive issues and topics that academics in higher education and further education settings will be expected to…

Abstract

Any topic can be sensitive, and every subject area will have sensitive issues and topics that academics in higher education and further education settings will be expected to negotiate. Your ability to negotiate sensitive topics is important because the ways in which you engage and teach about sensitive topics will affect your ability to provide a positive learning experience and teaching alliance with students. In practice, you will face enormous pressure to ‘deliver’ on teaching, which will only be mirrored by similar freedoms in deciding on how and what needs to be done to get students to where they need to be. Negotiating, identifying, preparing for and delivering teaching on sensitive subjects and topics can be difficult in individual academics. This chapter, seeks to prepare you for developing a deeper understanding of some of the philosophical, theoretical, and practical-based concerns and issues related to teaching sensitive topics and subjects. This chapter begins with providing a rationale for what follows, and it explores some of the key themes, positionality, identity, transformational learning and lived experience, that are explored in greater depth in the collection. This chapter also contains a detailed breakdown of the structure and the content of this edited collection, and it concludes with some reflective comments about the implications of the collection for you as an individual and your career.

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Toby Brandon

139

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Rahida Mohammed

As a British Muslim woman who wears the hijab, the author’s identity/identities are often questioned and none more so than in boththe professional and educational settings they…

Abstract

As a British Muslim woman who wears the hijab, the author’s identity/identities are often questioned and none more so than in boththe professional and educational settings they occupy. This critical reflection hopes to highlight some assumptions around how the identity of the author of this chapter can be understood and challenged and foregrounds theways in which assumptions both liberate and instigate forms of oppression and opportunity. Identity theory has helped this author to understand how their identities are understood and has provided them with a lens from which to engage with others in challenging perceptions and building relationships.

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Lydia Lochhead

Individuals who are exploited and manipulated by criminal gangs are often wrongly labelled, stereotyped, and blamed (to varying levels) for the vulnerable positions that they find…

Abstract

Individuals who are exploited and manipulated by criminal gangs are often wrongly labelled, stereotyped, and blamed (to varying levels) for the vulnerable positions that they find themselves in. Individuals who perpetrate violence towards others have often also been victims of violence and crime themselves. Teaching about these groups and trying to represent their position and experiences is a difficult and sensitive area. Building on current research, experiences of teaching professionals and students about the exploitation of marginalised groups, serious violence, and crime during COVID-19, are reflected upon. In doing so, what is important for students to understand about marganilised groups is set out, and recommendations for improvements to teaching practice are discussed. Firstly, it is argued that where educators seek to help students learn about marginalised groups, there needs to be preparation to put the work in at the front end and reflect on their own assumptions, beliefs and learning needs. Secondly, they also need to think about the ‘active’ and ‘passive’ (Seddon, 2005) aspects of individual agency and to be as authentic as they can to the lived experiences of marginalised communities as community members engage in types of behaviours and access services. Finally, it is then important for them to open up opportunities for students to reflect on the more detailed aspects and wider social, economic, and structural factors that marginalised communities face as they endeavour to articulate their own needs in society.

Details

Developing and Implementing Teaching in Sensitive Subject and Topic Areas: A Comprehensive Guide for Professionals in FE and HE Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-126-4

Keywords

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