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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Ali Mursid and Pandji Anoraga

The growing numbers of Muslims visiting halal destinations motivated this study to explore halal destination attributes and revisit intention. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing numbers of Muslims visiting halal destinations motivated this study to explore halal destination attributes and revisit intention. This study aims to investigate how halal destination attributes affect destination attractiveness. Hence, it identifies the influence of halal destination attributes on perceived value, including functional and emotional value. It also verifies the effect of destination attractiveness on both functional value and emotional value. Finally, this framework verifies the effect of functional value and emotional value on revisit intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects data from visitors who have visited a halal destination located in three cities of Central Java Province in the past two years (2019–2020) using purposive sampling methods. A total of 314 respondents participated in this study and the data are analyzed by using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The result showed that halal destination attributes positively and significantly impact destination attractiveness. Moreover, halal destination attributes positively and significantly affect both functional and emotional value. Destination attractiveness positively and significantly affects functional value, as well as emotional value. Concerning the effect of functional value and emotional value on revisit intention, only emotional value positively and significantly affects revisit intention while functional value does not.

Originality/value

This study contributes to city tourism by elucidating halal destination attributes based on the means-ends theory. The results of this study reported the importance of halal destination attributes and the role of halal destination attractiveness and emotional value in enhancing Muslim travelers’ revisit intention to halal destination.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the…

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Said Hallaq

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but…

Abstract

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but also to enrich his love of hereafter and for achieving (falah) or success by sacrificing part of his profit for the benefit of the Muslim society (according to the degree of faith he possesses). This study aims to answer the following question: How does care for the good of the society influence the Muslim firm decisions? The answer to that question has been answered by formulating an objective function of the Muslim firm and deriving the optimally necessary conditions for maximization.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Muhammad Khalilur Rahman, Md Sohel Rana, Mohd Nazari Ismail, Mohd Zulkifli Muhammad, Muhammad Nazmul Hoque and Md. Abdul Jalil

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study is to explore tourists’ perception of halal tourism and its impact on word-of-mouth towards halal tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was applied in this study. Data were collected via 375 survey questionnaires and were analysed using partial least square method. Data were collected from Malaysia’s capital city and tourist spots in Kuala Lumpur, the administrative capital city in Putrajaya, and several cities in Selangor, the richest state in the country.

Findings

The findings revealed that trip quality has a higher significant impact on satisfaction and trip value. The perception of a halal tourism destination is found to have a significant influence on satisfaction and trip value. Trip value is significantly related to satisfaction but not associated with word-of-mouth (WOM). Satisfaction of tourists has a significant impact on WOM towards travel destinations.

Research limitations/implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and its significant influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism. The results of this study provide useful insights for Malaysia’s tourism industry, particularly for the tourism marketing in Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya cities as tourist destinations.

Practical implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and the influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism.

Originality/value

This study examined the potential impact of non-Muslim tourists’ perception of halal tourism destinations and their WOM for halal tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Hilda Monoarfa, Agus Rahayu, Fitranty Adirestuty, Rizuwan Abu Karim, Azlin Zanariah Bahtar, Zamzuri Ahmad Nazari and Nurazree Mahmud

The purpose of this study is to find out the level of influence of Islamic attributes and pull motivation to the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find out the level of influence of Islamic attributes and pull motivation to the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia. Furthermore, this study may reveal where variables have a strong influence on the variable satisfaction of Muslim tourists. In addition, this study also wanted to know if Islamic attributes can influence the satisfaction of Muslim tourists with pull motivation as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative methods, this study analyzed the results of questionnaires that have been distributed to 200 Muslim tourist respondents who have visited Indonesia. To declare the hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed with structural equation modeling-partial least square using SmartPLS application version 3.2.7.

Findings

From this study, it was discovered that pull motivation has more effect on the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia. Other results showed that both Islamic attributes and pull motivation simultaneously affect the satisfaction of Muslim tourists. Furthermore, Islamic attributes can affect pull motivation and pull motivation can also become an intermediary variable in bridging the impact of Islamic attributes on the satisfaction of Muslim tourists.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include the relatively small sample used and not yet taking foreign tourists as respondents. Besides that, you can also add several variables to complement this research in the future either as an intervening variable or a mediator variable.

Practical implications

To increase the satisfaction of Muslim tourists traveling to Indonesia, policymakers in Indonesia must further improve the facilities of the pull motivation aspect such as the cleanliness of tourist attractions, exotic locations and hygienic shopping centers. In addition, aspects of Islamic attributes must also be updated, such as aspects of adequate worship facilities and tourist attractions that apply the concept of halal for Muslims.

Originality/value

The originality of this study on the pull motivation variable as an intervening variable and adding the Islamic attribute variable in the case of Muslim tourist satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Mohamed Fawzi Afifi, Asad Mohsin and Mustafa Farouk

The study investigates perceptions and debate that are linked to the relationship between religion, alcohol, tourism and hospitality within the context of an Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates perceptions and debate that are linked to the relationship between religion, alcohol, tourism and hospitality within the context of an Islamic tourist destination. An analytical approach involving a review of literature, assessment of conservationists’ attitude representing Islam and Christianity, and current trends using a student sample to determine intentions is used. The study findings suggest that alcohol and religiosity are not compatible, use, abuse and dependency are more common among non-believers than believers. A tense dispute continues in the Arab World around alcohol. The study contributes to the literature by highlighting economics, social practice, theoretical and managerial implications related to alcohol service in Egypt and suggests a way forward for global Muslim staff working in the hospitality, tourism, and travel industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an analytical approach involving a review of literature, assessment of conservationists’ attitude representing Islam and Christianity and current trends using a student sample to determine intentions.

Findings

The study findings suggest that alcohol and religiosity are not compatible, use, abuse and dependency are more common among non-believers than believers. A tense dispute continues in the Arab World around alcohol.

Research limitations/Implications

The study is assessing the relationship between religion, alcohol, hospitality and tourism within the context of Egypt, advances knowledge about halal tourism and hospitality by explicitly linking religious obligations and the implication on tourism. The findings should be used with caution considering the subjectivity of responses and the size of the sample.

Practical implications

The service/hospitality industry managers could be Muslims or non-Muslims representing major airlines, hotels and restaurants where alcohol is served by Muslim employees. These managers should consider avoiding the sale or serving of alcohol completely, and if not, they must not force their workers to serve alcohol if they chose not to.

Social implications

Faith-based (e.g. Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Mormons), ideological or ethically driven alternative services should be created for the staff concerned with alcohol service/consumption. Employment is to be provided to adherents of these faiths or ideologies as an alternative resort.

Details

Tourism Critiques: Practice and Theory, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-1225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Sasiwemon Sukhabot and Zulfiqar Ali Jumani

This study aims to discuss the influence of Islamic brand attitude, Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages over the consumption behaviour towards…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the influence of Islamic brand attitude, Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages over the consumption behaviour towards Islamic brands among non-Muslims and tests the subjective norm (Muslim friends and family members) moderating role.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested by adopting the PLS-SEM testing methodology after collecting data by using the convenient sampling technique. Total 497 responses were used for data analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the non-Muslims of Thailand are influenced by the Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages.

Research limitations/implications

This work examines the non-Muslims who are buying an Islamic brand, and they are the consumers and users of it.

Practical implications

These results guide future researchers and organisations to strategies accordingly to motivate non-Muslim consumers towards the Islamic brands.

Originality/value

The research presents the construction of a model for understanding Islamic brand attitudes plus its components and as well as the moderating role of subjective norm between Islamic brand attitudes and consumption behaviours of non-Muslims of Thailand towards Islamic brand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Siti Hasnah Hassan and Husna Ara

The desire to find a new look of expressing the Muslim identity in society has led to a renewal of Muslim women’s interest in fashion. This allows fashion players to make…

Abstract

Purpose

The desire to find a new look of expressing the Muslim identity in society has led to a renewal of Muslim women’s interest in fashion. This allows fashion players to make trendy clothing and expand their business to meet the rising needs of Muslim women. Thus, this study aims to explore the concept of hijab fashion from the perspective of Islamic clothing retailers in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected qualitatively using semi-structured interviews and analysed using a deductive thematic analysis.

Findings

This exploratory study describes hijab fashion as a representation of clothing for ideal contemporary Muslim women that enhances the beauty in Islamic outfits from the perspective of Islamic clothing retailers. Hijab fashion has emerged as a modern form of the modest dress code in accordance with Islamic guidelines representing the hijaber identity. It is not just a veil to cover the awrah but also represents the impression of fashionableness and modernity, reflecting the self-image, trendy style and personality representing the true ideal Muslim women, who are known as Muslimah.

Research limitations/implications

The sample and findings are based exclusively on the perception of retailers directly involved in Malaysia’s Islamic fashion business.

Practical implications

The findings from this study benefit the fashion retailers, Islamic fashion industry players and policymakers by highlighting the importance of providing appropriate products and services concerning the growth of Muslim consumer market and their spending behaviour.

Originality/value

The findings offer a new perspective on the nature of the phenomenon of hijaber fashion as a symbol of the modern Muslim woman from the viewpoint of Islamic fashion practitioners.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Huseyin Arasli, Mehmet Bahri Saydam, Tugrul Gunay and Kaveh Jafari

On a global scale, the Muslim-friendly hospitality business has intensified hotel competition. Given the paucity of research on the important service quality…

Abstract

Purpose

On a global scale, the Muslim-friendly hospitality business has intensified hotel competition. Given the paucity of research on the important service quality characteristics of Muslim-friendly hotels, this study aims to identify the major themes encountered by tourists at Muslim-friendly hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used content analyzes (qualitative) to examine 1,250 reviews using Leximancer software. Data were gathered from the online travel website booking.com. The top 10 Islamic hotels according to Crescent ranking were taken into a data set.

Findings

Qualitative (narratives) analysis showcased nine key themes, namely, “hotel,” “staff,” “food,” “room,” “location,” “pool,” “facilities,” “cleanliness” and “Wi-Fi.” Furthermore, the findings of this study contribute to filling research voids in the literature by distinguishing themes linked with halal hotel “satisfaction” from those associated with “dissatisfaction.”

Originality/value

The findings of this research offer valuable visions into halal-hotel travelers’ overall experiences based on user-generated content and facilitate the identification of the dominant themes linked with a different value for money ratings.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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