To read this content please select one of the options below:

Personality disorders as a predictor of counterproductive knowledge behavior: the application of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-IV

Alexander Serenko (Alexander Serenko is based at the Faculty of Business and IT, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada)

Journal of Knowledge Management

ISSN: 1367-3270

Article publication date: 18 January 2023

Issue publication date: 19 October 2023

462

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the role of personality disorders in the context of counterproductive knowledge behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey administered to 120 full-time employees recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Personality disorders were measured by means of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-IV.

Findings

Personality disorders play an important role in the context of counterproductive knowledge behavior: employees suffering from various personality disorders are likely to hide knowledge from their fellow coworkers and engage in knowledge sabotage. Of particular importance are dependent, narcissistic and sadistic personality disorders as well as schizophrenic and delusional severe clinical syndromes. There is a need for a paradigm shift in terms of how the research community should portray those who engage in counterproductive knowledge behavior, reconsidering the underlying assumption that all of them act deliberately, consciously and rationally. Unexpectedly, most personality disorders do not facilitate knowledge hoarding.

Practical implications

Organizations should provide insurance coverage for the treatment of personality disorders, assist those seeking treatment, inform employees about the existence of personality disorders in the workplace and their impact on interemployee relationships, facilitate a stress-free work environment, remove social stigma that may be associated with personality disorders and, as a last resort, reassign workers suffering from extreme forms of personality disorders to tasks that require less interemployee interaction (instead of terminating them).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this work represents one of the first attempts to empirically investigate the notion of personality disorders in the context of knowledge management.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The author is grateful to two anonymous JKM reviewers for their very critical, valuable feedback on the previous version of this paper. He also would like to thank the JKM Editor-in-Chief for seeing merit in this unique research topic.

Citation

Serenko, A. (2023), "Personality disorders as a predictor of counterproductive knowledge behavior: the application of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-IV", Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 27 No. 8, pp. 2249-2282. https://doi.org/10.1108/JKM-10-2021-0796

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Related articles