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An alternative source of collagen for Muslim consumers: halal and environmental concerns

Jarita Duasa (Department of Economics, Kulliyyah of Economics and Management Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
Afifah Muhamad Husin (Department of Economics, Kulliyyah of Economics and Management Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
Mohamed Asmy Mohd Thas Thaker (Department of Economics, Kulliyyah of Economics and Management Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
Maya Puspa Rahman (Department of Economics, Kulliyyah of Economics and Management Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)

Journal of Islamic Marketing

ISSN: 1759-0833

Article publication date: 25 June 2021

Issue publication date: 30 November 2022

195

Abstract

Purpose

The sources of collagens and gelatins are recently being questioned because it sourced from porcine or non-halal slaughtered animals. There are also concerns regarding the transfer of diseases from animal sources of collagen to human users. This study aims to propose an alternative source of collagen using recombinant collagen-like protein (halal-based) and to analyze factors contribute to the probability of using this alternative source of collagen among consumers in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected are tested empirically using statistical tools and logistic regression.

Findings

This study finds two important inferences. First, the probability consumers opt for the alternative source of collagen is significantly determined by age of consumers and the level of their incomes. The likelihood of the consumers to opt for this alternative source of collagen is higher among elderly and lower income consumers. Second, the probability of using this alternative source of collagen with the purpose to protect the marine life is higher among young and lower income consumers. Thus, marketing variations of a product using this alternative source of collagen that is targeted to high age bracket and low income group of consumers often sees as a good strategy as compared with a more generalized marketing strategy. The younger consumers are also among potential consumers whose concern is more on health without endangering marine species or biodiversity.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of areas in this study is limited to Klang Valley (Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia). The respondents are those staying and working in these areas regardless of citizenship and ethnicity.

Originality/value

This study is proposing a new and promising way for mass production of collagen using recombinant collagen-like protein. Collagen-like protein was found in bacteria, and it may represent an alternative biosynthetic collagen material which is expected to be an alternative of the existing sources which are non-halal and endanger biodiversity and ecosystem.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

This study is extracted from a research project funded by the Trans-disciplinary Research Grant Scheme (TRGS), TRGS/1/2018/UIAM/01/1/2, Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. The authors would like to thank the Ministry for generously funding the research.

Citation

Duasa, J., Husin, A.M., Asmy Mohd Thas Thaker, M. and Rahman, M.P. (2022), "An alternative source of collagen for Muslim consumers: halal and environmental concerns", Journal of Islamic Marketing, Vol. 13 No. 11, pp. 2232-2253. https://doi.org/10.1108/JIMA-09-2020-0268

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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