Factors affecting smart working: evidence from Australia

Ashish Malik (Central Coast Business School, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia)
Philip J. Rosenberger III (Central Coast Business School, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia)
Martin Fitzgerald (Central Coast Business School, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia)
Louise Houlcroft (Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia)

International Journal of Manpower

ISSN: 0143-7720

Publication date: 5 September 2016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse data from the New South Wales Government’s Pilot Programme of establishing Smart Work Hubs (SWHs) for enabling teleworking in two busy commuter corridors. The paper analyses the relationships between various firm, job and personal factors and the perceived value, attitudes and expected usage by users of the SWHs.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a cross-sectional survey design, the characteristics, values and attitudes of 117 SWH users were analysed using partial least squares (PLS) method of structural equation modelling (SEM). SEM-PLS approach is considered appropriate especially in prediction-based studies and to estimate an endogenous target construct.

Findings

Results revealed that perceived SWH value significantly influenced attitude towards the SWH, which then had a significant influence on SWH usage intentions, with personal, job and firm factors also playing a role. Further analysis revealed four variables that significantly influenced the perception of family-value benefits (age, income, hub commute distance, work commute distance), however, there were none that significantly influenced the perception of work benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limits statistical inferences and generalisations to be drawn. Further, this paper also discusses how the low and uneven uptake of teleworking at a SWH raises several managerial and policy implications needing attention.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study analysing the expected values, attitudes and usage intentions of teleworkers in a SWH context. This study adds to the emerging body of human resource management studies on an outward-looking approach. The novel context will provide a useful base for subsequent studies.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank and acknowledge the New South Wales Government for funding the Smart Work Hub Pilot Program's research (G140093).

Citation

Malik, A., Rosenberger, P.J., Fitzgerald, M. and Houlcroft, L. (2016), "Factors affecting smart working: evidence from Australia", International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 37 No. 6, pp. 1042-1066. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJM-12-2015-0225

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2016, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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