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Conflicts, battlefields, indigenous peoples and tourism: addressing dissonant heritage in warfare tourism in Australia and North America in the twenty‐first century

Raynald Harvey Lemelin (Based at the School of Outdoor Recreation, Parks & Tourism, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada)
Kyle Powys Whyte (Based at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Kelsey Johansen (Based at the School of Outdoor Recreation, Parks & Tourism, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada)
Freya Higgins Desbiolles (Based at the Department of Tourism and the School of Management, University of Otago of the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia)
Christopher Wilson (Based at Yunggorendi First Nations Centre for Higher Education and Research, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
Steve Hemming (Based at the Department of English, Creative Writing and Australian Studies, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research

ISSN: 1750-6182

Article publication date: 2 August 2013

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the omission of Indigenous narratives in battlefields and sites of conflicts while also highlighting how certain battlefields and sites of conflicts have attempted to address dissonant heritage by diversifying interpretation strategies and implementing elements of collaborative management approaches, thereby addressing Indigenous erasure.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a content analysis, field studies and case studies to examine dissonant heritage in warfare tourism sites involving Indigenous peoples in Australia and North America.

Findings

The content analysis reveals that aboriginal erasure is still prevalent within the literature on warfare and battlefield tourism. However, the case studies suggest that dissonant heritage in warfare tourism is being addressed through collaborative management strategies and culturally sensitive interpretation strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The content analysis is limited to tourism journals. The case studies highlight sites that are using adaptive management and integrating Indigenous peoples.

Practical implications

The study of dissonant heritage and warfare tourism, while relatively young, is beginning to address aboriginal erasure and cultural dissonance; this study is a contribution to this area of research.

Social implications

Addressing the impacts of aboriginal erasure and heritage dissonance in colonial settings heals the hurts of the past, while empowering communities. It also provides Indigenous communities with opportunities to diversify current tourism products.

Originality/value

This is a collaborative international paper involving Indigenous and non‐Indigenous scholars from Australia, Canada, and the USA.

Keywords

Citation

Harvey Lemelin, R., Powys Whyte, K., Johansen, K., Higgins Desbiolles, F., Wilson, C. and Hemming, S. (2013), "Conflicts, battlefields, indigenous peoples and tourism: addressing dissonant heritage in warfare tourism in Australia and North America in the twenty‐first century", International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Vol. 7 No. 3, pp. 257-271. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2012-0038

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited